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Strategic Environmental Assessment and Sustainability Appraisal - Proposed Submission Core Strategy and Policies DPD

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Appendix A

Review of Plans, Programmes and Environmental Protection Objectives

International Plans and Programmes

  • World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD), Johannesburg, September 2002

  • European Sustainable Development Strategy (2006)

  • EU Sixth Environmental Action Plan 2002 - 2012

  • European Spatial Development Perspective (ESDP) (May 1999)

  • Aarhus Convention (Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-Making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters) (1998)

  • UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (1992)

  • Kyoto Protocol to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (1997)

  • Second European Climate Change Programme (ECCP II) 2005

  • Directive to Promote Electricity from Renewable Energy (2001/77/EC) (as amended by 2001/77/EC, 2003/30/EC and 2009/28/EC)

  • European Transport Policy for 2010: A Time to Decide

  • EU Directive on Ambient Air Quality and Cleaner Air for Europe (2008/50/EC)

  • Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC)

  • Drinking Water Directive (98/83/EC)

  • Directive on the Assessment and Management of Flood Risks (2007/60/EC)

  • UN Convention on Biological Diversity (1992)

  • Bern Convention on the Conservation of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats (1979)

  • Bonn Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (1979)

  • EU Birds Directive (2009/147/EC)

  • Directive on the Conservation of Natural Habitats and of Wild Fauna and Flora (92/43/EEC)

  • Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, especially as waterfowl habitat (1971)

  • EU Biodiversity Strategy (1998)

  • European Landscape Convention (2000)

  • UNESCO Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage (1972)

  • Waste Framework Directive (2008/98/EC)

  • Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive (94/62/EC) (as amended by 2004/12/EC and 2005/20/EC)

  • Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive 91/271/EEC (as amended by 98/15/EC)

  • SEA Directive 2001/42/EC

  • IPCC Climate Change 2014 Synthesis Report (November 2014)

National Plans and Programmes

  • UK Sustainable Development Strategy: Securing the Future (2005) and the UK’s Shared Framework for Sustainable Development, One Future – Different Paths (2005)

  • Securing the Regions’ Futures – Strengthening the Delivery of Sustainable Development in the English Regions (2006)

  • Sustainable Communities: Building for the Future (2003)

  • Planning Act 2008

  • Environmental Quality in Spatial Planning (2005)

  • World Class Places: The Government’s Strategy for Improving Quality of Place (2009)

  • The Countryside in and Around Towns: A vision for connecting town and country in the pursuit of sustainable development (2005)

  • The Code for Sustainable Homes: Setting the Standard in Sustainability for New Homes (2008)

  • Sustainable Communities, Settled Homes, Changing Lives – A Strategy for Tackling Homelessness (ODPM) (2005)

  • Climate Change Act (2008)

  • Stern Review of the Economics of Climate Change (2006)

  • UK Carbon Plan (2011)

  • Climate change and biodiversity adaptation: the role of the spatial planning system – a Natural England commissioned report (2009)

  • Planning for Climate Change – Guidance and Model Policies for Local Authorities (2010)

  • Energy White Paper: Meeting the Energy Challenge (2007)

  • Energy Act 2013

  • Delivering a Sustainable Transport System (2008)

  • The Future of Transport White Paper – A Network for 2030 (2004)

  • Low Carbon Transport: A Greener Future - A Carbon Reduction Strategy for Transport (2009)

  • Wildlife and Countryside Act (1981) (as amended 1991)

  • The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations (2010) (as amended 2012)

  • The Countryside and Rights of Way (CRoW) Act (2000)

  • The Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act (2006)

  • Natural Environment White Paper (HM Government, 2011)

  • The Guidance for Local Authorities on Implementing the Biodiversity Duty (2007)

  • Conserving Biodiversity – The UK Approach (2007)

  • Biodiversity 2020: A strategy for England’s wildlife and ecosystem services (2011)

  • UK Biodiversity Action Plan (1994)

  • Biodiversity by Design: A Guide for Sustainable Communities (Town and Country Planning Association) (2004)

  • UK Post-2010 Biodiversity Framework 2012

  • Biodiversity Indicators in Your Pocket (2013) Defra

  • A Strategy for England’s Trees, Woodlands and Forests (2007)

  • Open Space Strategies: Best Practice Guidance (CABE and the Greater London Authority, 2009)

  • Heritage in Local Plans: How to create a sound plan under the NPPF (2012)

  • The Geological Conservation Review (GCR) (ongoing)

  • Safeguarding our Soils: A Strategy for England (Defra, 2009)

  • Natural England’s Green Infrastructure Guidance (2009)

  • Accessible Natural Green Space Standards in Towns and Cities: A Review and Toolkit for their Implementation (2003) and Nature Nearby: Accessible Green Space Guidance (2010)

  • Heritage White Paper: Heritage Protection for the 21st Century (2007) The Air Quality Strategy for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland (2007)

  • Water Resources Strategy for England and Wales (2009)

  • Future Water: The Government’s Water Strategy for England (2008)

  • Flood and Water Management Act (2010)

  • Making Space for Water: Taking Forward a New Government Strategy for Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management (2005)

  • Waste Strategy for England (2007)

  • The Egan Review – Skills for Sustainable Communities (2004)

  • Working for a Healthier Tomorrow – Dame Carol Black’s Review of the health of Britain’s working age population (2008)

  • Health Effects of Climate Change in the UK 2008 – An update of the Department of Health Report 2001/2002

  • Tackling Health Inequalities – A Programme for Action (2003, including the 2007 Status Report on the Programme for Action)

  • Water for People and the Environment: A Strategy for England and Wales (2009)

  • National Planning Policy Framework (2012)

  • Localism Act 2011

  • PPS10: Planning for Sustainable Waste Management (2005) and A Companion Guide to PPS10 (2006)

  • Building for Life 12 (2012)

  • Europe 2020: UK National Reform Programme 2013 (April 2013)

  • Local Air Quality Management: Consultation on options to improve air quality management in England (July 2013)

Regional and County Level Plans and Programmes

  • A Sustainable Development Framework For The East Of England (2001)

  • East of England Forecasting Model 2013

  • Transforming Suffolk’s Community Strategy 2008-2028 (2008 revision)

  • Transforming Suffolk Community Strategy: Suffolk Strategic Partnership (2008)

  • Inventing our Future: Collective Action for a Sustainable Economy. The Regional Economic Strategy for the East of England 2008 – 2031 (2008)

  • Suffolk Growth Strategy 2013

  • Minerals and Waste Development Framework: Waste Core Strategy (2011), Minerals Core Strategy 2008

  • Joint Municipal Waste Management Strategy for Suffolk 2003 – 2020 (2003)

  • Suffolk’s Climate Action Plan 2 (2012)

  • Suffolk’s Local Transport Plan 2011 - 2031

  • New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership ‘Towards a Growth Plan’ 2013

  • Expanding Suffolk’s Horizons: Economic Strategy – Taking Suffolk to 2013

  • East of England (LSC) Equality and Diversity Action Plan 2008

  • Suffolk Haven Gateway Employment Land Review 2009

  • East of England Plan for Sport (2004)

  • Biodiversity Action Plan for Suffolk (Various dates)

  • Water for Life and Livelihoods: River Basin Management Plan: Anglian River Basin District (2009)

  • In Step with Suffolk: Right of Way Improvement Plan (2006-16)

  • Leading the Way – Green Economy Pathfinder Manifesto 2012-15, New Anglia LEP

  • Wild Anglia Manifesto ,September 2013, Part 1 Aims and Objectives

  • Suffolk’s Nature Strategy (Wild Anglia, 2014)

  • Suffolk Growth Strategy March 2013

  • Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy for Suffolk (Suffolk Health and Wellbeing Board, 2013)

  • Suffolk Cycling Strategy (Suffolk County Council)

  • Anglian Water’s Water Resources Management Plan 2015

Local Plans and Programmes

  • One–Ipswich Community Strategy ‘Everybody Matters’ 2008 – 2010

  • Ipswich Borough Council Level 2 Strategic Flood Risk Assessment (Ipswich Borough Council, 2011)

  • The Ipswich Drainage and flood defence policy (2002 with minor updates in 2009)

  • Integrated Landscape Character Objectives (2010)

  • Countryside Character Volume 6: East of England (1998)

  • Ipswich Economic Development Strategy 2012 – 2026

  • Ipswich Borough Council Corporate Plan (2012)

  • Ipswich Cultural Strategy 2011-2014

  • Ipswich Environment Strategy 2010

  • The Ipswich Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2011 – 2016

  • Ipswich Housing Strategy 2010/11-15/16

  • Ipswich Town Centre Master Plan 2012

  • Tree Management Policy 2010

  • Allotment Strategy 2014-2020 (2005)

  • Ipswich Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment Draft Update Report (2013)

  • Ipswich Housing Market Area Strategic Housing Market Assessment 2012

  • Ipswich Transport Model Assessment, Aecom, 2010

  • Suffolk Coastal District Council Core Strategy and Development Management Policies adopted 5th July 2013

  • Mid Suffolk District Council Core Strategy Focused Review adopted December 2012

  • Babergh Core Strategy and Policies 2011-2031 (2014)

  • A Fairer Ipswich Equality Scheme 2012-15

  • Community Cohesion Policy 2009

  • Equality and Diversity policy 2010

  • Homelessness Strategy 2008-13

  • Ipswich Local Transport Plan (part of the Suffolk LTP, SCC 2011-2031)

  • Air Quality Management Strategy

  • Tourism Strategy (Ipswich Borough Council, 2004)

  • Ipswich Employment Land Availability Report 2012

  • Ipswich Development and Flood Risk SPD (Ipswich Borough Council, 2014)

  • Haven Gateway Green Infrastructure Study (Haven Gateway Partnership, 2008)

  • Open Space and Biodiversity Policy/Strategy 2013-2023 (Ipswich Borough Council, 2013)

  • The Vision for Ipswich

Summary of International Plans and Programmes

International Plans

Key Objectives Relevant to Plan and SA

Key Targets and Indicators Relevant to Plan and SA

Implications for Plan

Implications for SA

World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD), Johannesburg, September 2002

The World Summit reaffirmed the international commitment to sustainable development. The aims are to:

  • Accelerate the shift towards sustainable consumption and production with a 10-year framework of programmes of action

  • Reverse trend in loss of natural resources

  • Urgently and substantially increase the global share of renewable energy

  • Significantly reduce the rate of loss of biodiversity by 2010

No specific targets or indicators, however key actions include:

  • Greater resource efficiency

  • Support business innovation and take up of best practice in technology and management

  • Waste reduction and producer responsibility

  • Sustainable consumer consumption and procurement

  • Create a level playing field for renewable energy and energy efficiency

  • New technology development

  • Push on energy efficiency

  • Low-carbon programmes

  • Reduced impacts on biodiversity

The plan needs to include objectives that encourage resource efficiency. The plan should recognise the importance of renewable energy and the need to reduce energy consumption and improve energy efficiency. The plan needs to include policies that encourage and contribute to the protection and enhancement of biodiversity.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to renewable energy use, biodiversity protection and enhancement, and careful use of natural resources. The SA Framework should include objectives to cover the action areas. The SA Framework should include objectives, indicators and targets that address biodiversity.

European Sustainable Development Strategy (2006)

The Strategy sets out how the EU will effectively live up to its long-standing commitment to meet the challenges of sustainable development. It reaffirms the need for global solidarity and the importance of strengthening work with partners outside of the EU.

The Strategy sets objectives and actions for seven key priority challenges until 2010. The priorities are:

  • Climate change and clean energy

  • Sustainable transport

  • Sustainable consumption and production

  • Conservation and management of natural resources

  • Public Health

  • Social inclusion, demography and migration

Global poverty and sustainable development challenges

There are no specific indicators or targets of relevance.

The plan needs to take on board the key objectives, actions and priorities of the Strategy and contribute to the development of more sustainable communities by creating places where people want to live and work.

The SA Framework should include objectives that complement those of this Strategy.

A cross section of objectives are required that cover a number of themes.

EU Sixth Environmental Action Plan 2002 - 2012

The EAP reviews the significant environmental challenges and provides a framework for European environmental policy up to 2012.

The Programme aims at:

  • Emphasising climate change as an outstanding challenge of the next 10 years and beyond and contributing to the long term objective of stabilising greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. Thus a long term objective of a maximum global temperature increase of 2°C over pre-industrial levels and a CO2 concentration below 550 ppm shall guide the Programme. In the longer term this is likely to require a global reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases by 70 % as compared to 1990 as identified by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

  • Protecting, conserving, restoring and developing the functioning of natural systems, natural habitats, wild flora and fauna with the aim of halting desertification and the loss of biodiversity, including diversity of genetic resources, both in the EU and on a global scale

  • Contributing to a high level of quality of life and social well being for citizens by providing an environment where the level of pollution does not give rise to harmful effects on human health and the environment and by encouraging a sustainable urban development

Better resource efficiency and resource and waste management to bring about more sustainable production and consumption patterns, thereby decoupling the use of resources and the gen

eration of waste from the rate of economic growth and aiming to ensure that the consumption of renewable and non-renewable resources does not exceed the carrying capacity of the environment

The Plan sets objectives and priority areas for action on tackling climate change. The aims set out in the document are to be pursued by the following objectives (some of these are now out of date and are therefore not included):

  • Fulfilment of the Kyoto Protocol commitment of an 8 % reduction in emissions by 2008-12 compared to 1990 levels for the EU as a whole, in accordance with the commitment of each Member State set out in the Council Conclusions of 16 and 17 June 1998

Placing the Community in a credible position to advocate an international agreement on more stringent reduction targets for the second commitment period provided for by the Kyoto Protocol. This agreement should aim at cutting emissions significantly, taking full account, inter alia, of the findings of the IPCC 3rd Assessment Report, and take into account the necessity to move towards a global equitable distribution of greenhouse gas emissions

The plan needs to include policies that encompass the broad goals of the EU Plan e.g. recognising that local action needs to be taken with regard to climate change issues, protecting and enhancing biodiversity and encouraging waste reduction and recycling.

The SA should be mindful that documents prepared will need to conform to EU goals and aims, and should therefore include appropriate objectives, indicators and targets in the SA Framework.

European Spatial Development Perspective (ESDP) (January 1999)

The European Spatial Development Perspective is based on the EU aim of achieving balanced and sustainable development, in particular by strengthening environmentally sound economic development and social cohesion. This means, in particular, reconciling the social and economic claims for spatial development with an area’s ecological and cultural functions and, hence, contributing to a sustainable, and at larger scale, balanced territorial development.

This is reflected in the three following fundamental goals of European policy:

  • Economic and social cohesion

  • Conservation of natural resources and cultural heritage

More balanced competitiveness of the European territory

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance. Targets and measures for the most part deferred to Member States.

The plan needs to recognise the tensions between social, economic and environmental issues, and include policies that encourage sustainable development.

The SA should include objectives that complement the principles of the ESDP.

Care should be taken when preparing the SA to make sure it encompasses the philosophy of both national and international strategy documents.

Aarhus Convention (Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-Making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters) (1998)

In order to contribute to the protection of the right of every person of present and future generations to live in an environment adequate to his or her health and well-being, each Party subject to the convention shall guarantee the rights of access to information, public participation in decision-making, and access to justice in environmental matters in accordance with the provisions of this Convention.

As this is a high level EU policy document, responsibility for implementation has been deferred to the Member States:

Each Party shall take the necessary legislative, regulatory and other measures, including measures to achieve compatibility between the provisions implementing the information, public participation and access-to-justice provisions in this Convention, as well as proper enforcement measures, to establish and maintain a clear, transparent and consistent framework to implement the provisions of this Convention.

The development of the Local Plan should be a transparent process.

The SA should ensure that enough time is provided for consultation on the SA documents.

UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (1992)

The convention sets an overall framework for intergovernmental efforts to tackle the challenge posed by climate change. It acknowledges that the climatic system is affected by many factors and is a shared system. Under the Convention governments have to:

  • Gather and share information on greenhouse gas emissions

  • Launch national strategies for climate change

Co-operate in adapting to the impacts of climate change.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan should recognise local action needs to be taken with regards to climate change issues.

The SA Framework should include objectives, indicators and targets that relate to climate change, flooding and the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Kyoto Protocol to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (1997)

The Kyoto protocol, adopted in 1997, reinforced the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. It addressed the problem of anthropogenic climate change by requiring developed countries to set legally binding emission reduction targets for greenhouse gases.

Industrial nations agreed to reduce their collective emissions of greenhouse gases by 5.2% from 1990 levels by the period 2008 to 2012. Countries can achieve their Kyoto targets by:

  • Reducing greenhouse gas emissions in their own country

  • Implementing projects to reduce emissions in other countries

Trading in carbon. Countries that have achieved their Kyoto targets will be able to sell their excess carbon allowances to countries finding it more difficult or too expensive to meet their targets

The plan needs to include policies that encompass the broad goals of the Kyoto Protocol, e.g. recognising that local action needs to be taken with regards to climate change issues.

The SA should ensure that the Local Plan conforms to the broad goals and aims of the Kyoto Protocol and include appropriate objectives, indicators and targets in the SA Framework.

Second European Climate Change Programme (ECCP II) 2005

Initiated in 2005, the programme builds on the First Climate Change Programme and seeks to continue to drive climate change mitigation across Europe, with the aim of limiting climate change and meeting Kyoto targets. It also seeks to promote adaptation to the effects of inevitable and predicted climate change.

Most initiatives in the programme refer to EU-wide elements of policy related, for example, to emissions trading, technological specifications and carbon capture and storage.

There are therefore no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan and allocations should take account of the need to understand and adapt to the potential impacts of climate change such as weather extremes and coastal flooding.

The SA Framework should include a target to contribute towards the mitigation and adaption of the effects of climate change.

IPCC Fifth Assessment Synthesis Report (November 2014)

The report demonstrates the need and strategic considerations for both adaptation and global-scale mitigation to manage risks from climate change. Building on these insights, the report presents near-term response options that could help achieve such strategic goals. Near-term adaptation and mitigation actions will differ across sectors and regions, reflecting development status, response capacities, and near- and long-term aspirations with regard to both climate and non-climate outcomes. Because adaptation and mitigation inevitably take place in the context of multiple objectives, particular attention is given to the ability to develop and implement integrated approaches that can build on co-benefits and manage trade-offs.

No specific targets or indicators are included. It’s been acknowledged that many adaptation and mitigation options can help address climate change, but no single option is sufficient by itself. Effective implementation depends on policies and cooperation at all scales, and can be enhanced through integrated responses that link mitigation and adaptation with other societal objectives.

The plan and allocations should take account of the need to understand and adapt to the potential impacts of climate change such as weather extremes and coastal flooding.

The SA Framework should include a target to contribute towards the mitigation and adaption of the effects of climate change.

Directive to Promote Electricity from Renewable Energy (2001/77/EC) (as amended by 2001/77/EC, 2003/30/EC and 2009/28/EC)

This Directive aims to promote an increase in the contribution of renewable energy sources to electricity production in the internal market for electricity and to create a basis for a future Community Framework.

Member States are obliged to take steps to increase the consumption of electricity produced from renewable energy sources, by setting national indicative targets, in terms of a percentage of electricity consumption by 2010.

Member States are obliged to take appropriate steps to encourage greater consumption of electricity produced from renewable energy sources in conformity with the national indicative targets.

Global indicative target: 12% of gross national energy consumption by 2010 and 22.1% indicative share of electricity produced from renewable energy sources in total Community electricity consumption by 2010.

UK target: renewables to account for 10% of UK consumption by 2010.

The plan should recognise the importance of renewable energy and the need to increase the consumption of electricity produced from renewable energy sources.

The SA Framework should include objectives to cover the action areas and encourage energy efficiency.

European Transport Policy for 2010: A Time to Decide

This policy outlines the need to improve the quality and effectiveness of transport in Europe. A strategy has been proposed which is designed to gradually break the link between transport growth and economic growth to reduce environmental impacts and congestion. The policy advocates measures that promote an environmentally friendly mix of transport services.

There are no specific indicators or targets of relevance.

The development of the plan should consider issues relating to transport and access.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to the need for a sustainable and efficient transport system.

EU Directive on Ambient Air Quality and Cleaner Air for Europe (2008/50/EC)

The Directive merges four previous directives and one Council decision into a single directive on air quality and may also incorporate Directive 2004/107/EC relating to arsenic, cadmium, mercury, nickel and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a later date. It sets binding standards and target dates for reducing concentrations of SO2, NO2/NOx, PM10/PM2.5, CO, benzene and lead which are required to be translated into UK legislation.

The Directive seeks to maintain ambient-air quality where it is good and improve it in other cases.

Thresholds for pollutants are included in the Directives.

The plan should consider the maintenance of good air quality and the measures that can be taken to improve it. For example, reducing the number of vehicle movements.

The SA Framework should include objectives that address the protection of air quality.

Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC)

The purpose of this Directive is to establish a framework for the protection of inland surface waters, transitional waters, coastal waters and groundwater which:

(a) prevents further deterioration and protects and enhances the status of aquatic ecosystems and, with regard to their water needs, terrestrial ecosystems and wetlands directly depending on the aquatic ecosystems

(b) promotes sustainable water use based on a long-term protection of available water resources

(c) aims at enhanced protection and improvement of the aquatic environment, inter alia, through specific measures for the progressive reduction of discharges, emissions and losses of priority substances and the cessation or phasing-out of discharges, emissions and losses of the priority hazardous substances

(d) ensures the progressive reduction of pollution of groundwater and prevents its further pollution

(e) contributes to mitigating the effects of floods and droughts

Objectives for surface waters:

  • Achievement of good ecological status and good surface water chemical status by 2015

  • Achievement of good ecological potential and good surface water chemical status for heavily modified water bodies and artificial water bodies

  • Prevention of deterioration from one status class to another

  • Achievement of water-related objectives and standards for protected areas

Objectives for groundwater:

  • Achievement of good groundwater quantitative and chemical status by 2015

  • Prevention of deterioration from one status class to another

  • Reversal of any significant and sustained upward trends in pollutant concentrations and prevent or limit input of pollutants to groundwater

Achievement of water related objectives and standards for protected areas

The plan should consider how the water environment can be protected and enhanced, and include policies that promote the sustainable use of water resources.

The SA Framework should include objectives that consider effects upon water quality and resource.

Drinking Water Directive (98/83/EC)

Sets standards for a range of drinking water quality parameters.

The Directive includes standards that constitute legal limits.

The plan should recognise the effects of development on drinking water quality, and provide development and operational controls to prevent non-conformance with values.

The SA Framework should include objectives, indicators and targets that address water quality.

Directive on the Assessment and Management of Flood Risks (2007/60/EC)

This Directive aims to reduce and manage the risks that floods pose to human health, the environment, cultural heritage and economic activity. It requires Member States to assess whether all water courses and coast lines are at risk from flooding, to map the flood extent and assets and humans at risk in these areas, and to take adequate and coordinated measures to reduce this flood risk.

The Directive shall be carried out in co-ordination with the Water Framework Directive, most notably through flood risk management plans and river basin management plans, and also through co-ordination of the public participation procedures in the preparation of these plans.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan and allocations should consider potential flood risk, and prevent development within floodplains.

The SA Framework should include objectives that promote the reduction and management of flood risk.

UN Convention on Biological Diversity (1992)

This was one of the main outcomes of the 1992 Rio Earth Summit. The key objectives of the Convention are:

  • The conservation of biological diversity

  • The sustainable use of its components

  • The fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from the use of genetic resources

The achievement of the objectives in the Convention relies heavily upon the implementation of action at the national level.

The Convention aims to halt the worldwide loss of animal and plant species and genetic resources and save and enhance biodiversity.

It is essential that the development of the plan should consider biodiversity protection.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to the protection of biodiversity.

Bern Convention on the Conservation of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats (1979)

The principle objectives of the Convention are to conserve wild flora and fauna and their natural habitats, especially those species and habitats whose conservation requires the co-operation of several States, and to promote such co-operation. Particular emphasis is given to endangered and vulnerable species, including migratory species.

In order to achieve this the Convention imposes legal obligations on contracting parties, protecting over 500 wild plant species and more than 1000 wild animal species.

Each Contracting Party is obliged to:

  • Promote national policies for the conservation of wild flora, wild fauna and natural habitats, with particular attention to endangered and vulnerable species, especially endemic ones, and endangered habitats, in accordance with the provisions of this Convention

  • Have regard to the conservation of wild flora and fauna in its planning and development policies and in its measures against pollution

  • Promote education and disseminate general information on the need to conserve species of wild flora and fauna and their habitats

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan must take into account the habitats and species that have been identified under the Convention, and should include provision for the preservation, protection and improvement of the quality of the environment as appropriate.

The SA Framework should take into account the conservation provisions of the Convention, including provision for the preservation and protection of the environment.

Bonn Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (1979)

The Convention is an intergovernmental treaty under the United Nations Environment Programme. The aim is for contracting parties to work together to conserve terrestrial, marine and avian migratory species and their habitats (on a global scale) by providing strict protection for endangered migratory species.

The overarching objectives set for the Parties are:

  • Promote, co-operate in and support research relating to migratory species

  • Endeavour to provide immediate protection for migratory species included in Appendix I

Endeavour to conclude Agreements covering the conservation and management of migratory species included in Appendix II

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan must take into account the habitats and species that have been identified under this directive, and should include provision for their protection, preservation and improvement.

The SA Framework should include objectives protecting biodiversity.

EU Birds Directive (2009/147/EC)

The directive recognises that habitat loss and degradation are the most serious threats to the conservation of wild birds. The Directive places great emphasis on the protection of habitats for endangered as well as migratory species (listed in Annex I), especially through the establishment of a coherent network of Special Protection Areas (SPAs) comprising all the most suitable territories for these species.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The development of the plan must consider the preservation / enhancement of biodiversity resources including the protection of bird species.

The SA Framework should include sustainability objectives, indicators and targets for the preservation /enhancement of biodiversity resources.

Directive on the Conservation of Natural Habitats and of Wild Fauna and Flora (92/43/EEC)

Directive seeks to conserve natural habitats, and wild fauna and flora within the EU.

Member States are required to take measures to maintain or restore at favourable conservation status, natural habitats and species of Community importance. This includes Special Areas of Conservation and Special Protection Areas and it is usually accepted as also including Ramsar sites (European Sites).

Plans that may adversely affect the integrity of European sites may be required to be subject to Appropriate Assessment under the Directive.

The plan must take into account the habitats and species that have been identified under this directive, and should include provision for the preservation, protection and improvement of the quality of the environment as appropriate.

The SA should include the conservation provisions of the Directive, and include objectives that address the protection of biodiversity.

When required, a Habitats Regulations Assessment Screening exercise should be undertaken.

Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, especially as waterfowl habitat (1971)

The Convention is an intergovernmental treaty whose stated mission is ‘the conservation and wise use of all wetlands through local, regional and national actions and international cooperation, as a contribution towards achieving sustainable development throughout the world’ (Ramsar COP8, 2002).

There are presently 150 Contracting Parties to the Convention, with 1556 wetland sites, totalling 129.6 million hectares, designated for inclusion in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance

The original emphasis was on the conservation and wise use of wetlands primarily to provide habitat for waterbirds, however over the years the Convention has broadened its scope to incorporate all aspects of wetland conservation and wise use, recognising wetlands as ecosystems that are extremely important for biodiversity conservation and for the well-being of human communities.

There are no specific targets. Although now out of date, the general objectives of the Ramsar Strategic Plan 2003-2008 are:

  • To ensure the wise use of wetlands

  • To achieve appropriate management of wetlands of international importance

  • To promote international co-operation

  • To ensure that the required implementation mechanisms, resources and capacity are in place

To progress towards the accession of all countries to the Convention.

The plan needs to include policies that seek to protect designated sites for nature conservation, including Ramsar sites.

The SA Framework must incorporate the overarching principals of the Convention.

EU Biodiversity Strategy (1998)

The Strategy aims to anticipate, prevent and attack the causes of significant reduction or loss of biodiversity at the source, which will help both to reverse present trends in biodiversity decline and to place species and ecosystems, including agro-ecosystems, at a satisfactory conservation status, both within and beyond the territory of the EU.

There are no specific indicators or targets of relevance.

It is essential that the development of the plan should consider biodiversity protection.

The SA Framework should include sustainability objectives, indicators and targets that address biodiversity.

European Landscape Convention (2000)

The aims are to promote European landscape protection, management and planning, and to organise European co-operation on landscape issues. The Convention is part of the Council of Europe’s work on natural and cultural heritage, spatial planning, environment and local self-government, and establishes the general legal principles which should serve as a basis for adopting national landscape policies and establishing international co-operation in such matters.

The UK is a signatory to this Convention and is committed to its principles.

There are no specific indicators or targets of relevance.

The plan needs to consider the preservation and enhancement of the landscape.

The SA Framework should include objectives that relate to landscape protection.

UNESCO Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage (1972)

The Convention requires that cultural and natural heritage is identified, protected, conserved, presented and transmitted to future generations. It also requires that effective and active measures are taken to protect and conserve cultural and natural heritage.

There are no specific indicators or targets of relevance.

The plan needs to consider preservation and enhancement of cultural and natural heritage.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to the protection of historic and natural resources.

Waste Framework Directive (2008/98/EC)

This replaces the old Waste Framework Directive (2006/12/EC). The aims of this Directive are:

  • To provide a comprehensive and consolidated approach to the definition and management of waste.

  • To shift from thinking of waste as an unwanted burden to a valued resource and make Europe a recycling society.

  • To ensure waste prevention is the first priority of waste management.

To provide environmental criteria for certain waste streams, to establish when a waste ceases to be a waste (rather than significantly amending the definition of waste).

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan should seek to promote the key objectives of prevention, recycling and processing of waste, conversion of waste to usable materials, and energy recovery.

The SA needs to incorporate objectives, indicators and targets that address waste issues, e.g. minimisation and re-use etc.

Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive (94/62/EC) (as amended by 2004/12/EC and 2005/20/EC)

This Directive covers all packaging placed on the market in the Community and all packaging waste, whether it is used or released at industrial, commercial, office, shop, service, household or any other level, regardless of the material used. The Directive provides that the Member States shall take measures to prevent the formation of packaging waste, which may include national programmes and may encourage the reuse of packaging.

The Directive states that Member States must introduce systems for the return and/or collection of used packaging to attain certain targets. However, all targets are now out of date and are therefore not included.

Although this Directive dictates national legislation, the plan should encourage better waste management.

The SA Framework should be consistent with the waste management principles of this policy.

Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive 91/271/EEC (as amended by 98/15/EC)

This Directive concerns the collection, treatment and discharge of urban waste water and the treatment and discharge of waste water from certain industrial sectors. Its aim is to protect the environment from any adverse effects caused by the discharge of such waters.

The Directive establishes a timetable, which Member States must adhere to, for the provision of collection and treatment systems for urban waste water in agglomerations corresponding to the categories laid down in the Directive. However, all deadlines have since passed and are therefore not included.

The plan should seek to promote the appropriate collection, treatment and discharge of urban wastewater to protect the environment.

The SA needs to incorporate objectives, indicators and targets that complement those of this strategy.

SEA Directive 2001/42/EC

The directive concerns the SEA procedure, which is as follows: an environmental report is prepared in which the likely significant effects on the environment and the reasonable alternatives of the proposed plan or programme are identified. The public and the environmental authorities are informed and consulted on the draft plan or programme and the environmental report prepared. As regards plans and programmes which are likely to have significant effects on the environment in another Member State, the Member State in whose territory the plan or programme is being prepared must consult the other Member State(s). On this issue the SEA Directive follows the general approach taken by the SEA Protocol to the UN ECE Convention on Environmental Impact Assessment in a Transboundary Context.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan is required to be subject to SEA under the SEA Directive.

An SEA will be undertaken on the plan.

Summary of National Plans and Programmes

National Plans

Key Objectives Relevant to Plan and SA

Key Targets and Indicators Relevant to Plan and SA

Implications for Plan

Implications for SA

UK Sustainable Development Strategy: Securing the Future (2005) and the UK’s Shared Framework for Sustainable Development, One Future – Different Paths (2005)

The strategy for sustainable development aims to enable all people throughout the world to satisfy their basic needs and enjoy a better quality of life without compromising the quality of life of future generations.

As a result of the 2004 consultation to develop new UK sustainable development strategy the following issues have been highlighted as the main priority areas for immediate action:

  • Sustainable consumption and production - working towards achieving more with less

  • Natural resource protection and environmental enhancement - protecting the natural resources on which we depend

  • From local to global: building sustainable communities creating places where people want to live and work, now and in the future

  • Climate change and energy - confronting the greatest threat

In addition to these four priorities changing behaviour also forms a large part of the Governments thinking on sustainable development.

Because the UK sustainable development strategy aims to direct and shape policies, it is difficult to list the objectives of the strategy within the confines of the table. The following principles will be used to achieve the sustainable development purpose, and have been agreed by the UK Government, Scottish Executive, Welsh Assembly Government, and the Northern Ireland Administration:

  • Living within environmental limits

  • Ensuring a strong, healthy, and just society

  • Achieving a sustainable economy

  • Promoting good governance

  • Using sound science responsibly

There are no specific targets within the Strategy, although it makes reference to targets set in related PSA and other relevant policy statements.

There are also 68 high level UK Government strategy indicators, which will be used to measure the success with which the above objectives are being met. The most relevant are:

  • Greenhouse gas emissions: Kyoto target and CO2 emissions

  • CO2 emissions by end user: industry, domestic, transport (excluding international aviation), other

  • Renewable electricity: renewable electricity generated as a % of total electricity

  • Energy supply: UK primary energy supply and gross inland energy consumption

  • Water resource use: total abstractions from non-tidal surface and ground water sources

  • Waste arisings by (a) sector (b) method of disposal

  • Bird populations: bird population indices (a) farmland birds (b) woodland birds (c) birds of coasts and estuaries (d) wintering wetland birds

  • Biodiversity conservation: (a) priority species status (b) priority habitat status

  • River quality: rivers of good (a) biological (b) chemical quality

  • Air quality and health: (a) annual levels of particles and ozone (b) days when air pollution is moderate or higher

The plan needs to take on board the key objectives of the strategy and contribute to the development of more sustainable communities by creating places where people want to live and work.

The SA Framework should include objectives, indicators and targets that complement those of this strategy.

Securing the Regions’ Futures – Strengthening the Delivery of Sustainable Development in the English Regions (2006)

This document sets out the Government’s approach to strengthening the delivery of sustainable development at the regional level, following the publication of ‘Securing the Future: The UK Sustainable Development Strategy’.

The five guiding principles and four priorities set out in the UK Sustainable Development Strategy provide the framework within which the English regions work to improve quality of life. This document sets out an additional 20 commitments (with clear guidance) in order to help regions make a step change in their contribution to delivering sustainable development. The key elements of this approach are:

  • Using the sustainable development priorities and principles to underpin the refreshed or updated high-level regional strategies

  • Creating a strengthened role for regional sustainable development roundtables as champion bodies

  • Maximising the contribution which city-regions, sub-regions and inter-regional strategies can make to delivering sustainable development through innovative ways of working at these levels

  • Embedding sustainable development within the work of Government Offices and across their organisations and operations so as to become exemplars in the regions

  • Supporting the role of Regional Assemblies in delivering sustainable development through all their functions

  • Working with Regional Development Agencies (RDAs) to help them deliver economic productivity, which delivers sustainable development at the same time - and to ensure that this contribution is fully reflected in RDA assessments

This document provides an enabling framework within which the regions themselves can devise their own sustainable solutions to meet their needs and which are in line with the wider UK goals on sustainable development. It helps demonstrate the Government’s commitment to empowering regions in order that they can secure a sustainable future for their own communities, and one which helps us meet our sustainable development goals in the UK as a whole.

There are no specific indicators or targets of relevance.

The plan needs to consider sustainable development through its detailed guidance.

This plan is primarily concerned with delivery of sustainable development at the regional level. While not all elements are of relevance to this study, ensuring sustainable development in the English regions is essential, and should be considered through the SA process.

Sustainable Communities: Building for the Future (2003)

This action programme marks a step change in the policies for delivering sustainable communities for all. The plan allies measures to tackle the housing provision mis-match between the South-East and parts of the North and the Midlands, with more imaginative design and the continuation of an agreeable and convenient environment.

It is part of the Government’s wider drive to raise the quality of life in our communities through increasing prosperity, reducing inequalities, increasing employment, better public services, better health and education, tackling crime and anti-social behaviour, and much more. It reflects our key principles for public service reform: raising standards, devolving and delegating decision-making, providing greater flexibility over use of resources and choice for customers. The main elements are:

  • Sustainable communities

  • Step change in housing supply

  • New growth areas

  • Decent homes

Countryside and local environment

There are no specific indicators or targets of relevance.

The plan should encourage housing to be addressed by local partnerships as part of a wider strategy of neighbourhood renewal and sustainable communities.

It should also encourage environmental enhancement to be central to regeneration solutions, including the use of green space networks as a basis for development and have due regard for landscape character and designations.

The SA should acknowledge local action to meet local needs.

It should recognise that housing should be provided for all sections of society.

It should recognise that environmental improvements can improve quality of life

The SA Framework should be reviewed against these objectives.

Planning Act 2008

The Act created amendments to the functioning of the planning system, following recommendations from the Barker Review first proposed in the 2007 White Paper: Planning for a Sustainable Future. The two principal changes are:

  • The establishment of an Infrastructure Planning Commission to make decisions on nationally significant infrastructure projects.

Creation of the Community Infrastructure Levy, a charge to be collected from developers by local authorities for the provision of local and sub-regional infrastructure.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The preparation of the plan should consider the recommended actions in this document.

The SA should consider the means by which the measures in the Act may enable the plan to contribute towards sustainable development

Environmental Quality in Spatial Planning 2005

This document was jointly published by The Countryside Agency, English Heritage, English Nature and the EA. It provides guidance to help in the preparation of Regional Spatial Strategies and Local Development Frameworks, by ensuring incorporation of the natural, built and historic environment, and rural issues in plans and strategies.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The preparation of the plan should consider the recommended actions in this document.

The SA should take into consideration the issues raised in this document and ensure that an appropriate suite of objectives is developed, covering relevant aspects of the built and natural environment.

World Class Places: The Government’s Strategy for Improving Quality of Place (2009)

The Strategy identifies the benefits of creating well-designed places, including elements of spatial planning, urban design, architecture, green infrastructure and community involvement. It seeks to promote the consideration of place at all levels of planning. An Action Plan accompanying the Strategy sets out the following seven broad objectives

1: Strengthen leadership on quality of place at the national and regional level

2: Encourage local civic leaders and local government to prioritise quality of place

3: Ensure relevant government policy, guidance and standards consistently promote quality of place and are user-friendly

4: Put the public and community at the centre of place-shaping

5: Ensure all development for which central government is directly responsible is built to high design and sustainability standards and promotes quality of place

6: Encourage higher standards of market-led development

7: Strengthen quality of place skills, knowledge and capacity

The majority of actions reflect how the Government will take forward the strategy and use it in the creation of new guidance and to direct its interactions with relevant agencies. However, of particular relevance are:

2.3: Working with local authorities to achieve high quality development

2.5: Establishing an award scheme for high quality places

4.1: Encouraging public involvement in shaping the vision for their area and the design of individual schemes

4.2: Ensuring the citizens and service users are engaged in the design and development of public buildings

4.3: Encouraging community involvement in ownership and managing the upkeep of the public realm and community facilities

4.4: Promoting public engagement in creating new homes and neighbourhoods

6.1: Encouraging local authorities to set clear quality of place ambitions in their local planning framework

7.1: Strengthening advisory support on design quality for local authorities, the wider public sector and developers

7.2: Encouraging local authorities to share planning, design, conservation and related expertise

The plan should seek to reinforce and promote a sense of place. High standards of design and public consultation should be encouraged.

The SA Framework should recognise the importance of developing a high quality built environment and promoting high levels of community involvement.

The Countryside in and Around Towns: A vision for connecting town and country in the pursuit of sustainable development (2005)

This document was jointly published by the Countryside Agency and Groundwork, in 2005.

The document presents a new vision for a very extensive and often overlooked resource – the countryside in and around England’s towns and cities. The vision at the heart of the challenge to reduce the pressures that urban life places on the local and global environment is, ‘the need to ensure a high quality of life for all while at the same time reducing our collective impact on the resources we share’.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan needs to complement the aims of the strategy and seek to develop sustainable communities.

The SA Framework should include objectives, indicators and targets that seek to promote sustainable communities.

The Code for Sustainable Homes: Setting the Standard in Sustainability for New Homes (2008)

This document sets out the assessment process and the performance standards required for the Code for Sustainable Homes. The Code is a voluntary standard designed to improve the overall sustainability of new homes by setting a single framework within which the home building industry can design and construct homes to higher environmental standards.

The Code measures the sustainability of new homes in 9 categories:

  • Energy and CO2 Emissions

  • Pollution

  • Water

  • Health and Wellbeing

  • Materials

  • Management

  • Surface Water Run-off

  • Ecology

Waste

The plan should consider the requirements of the Code.

SA Objectives should be developed to reflect the categories of the code.

Sustainable Communities, Settled Homes, Changing Lives – A Strategy for Tackling Homelessness (ODPM) (2005)

The strategy aims to halve the number of households living in insecure temporary accommodation by 2010. This will be achieved by:

  • Preventing homelessness

  • Providing support for vulnerable people

  • Tackling the wider causes and symptoms of homelessness

  • Helping more people move away from rough sleeping

  • Providing more settled homes

For each of the above points a series of actions are identified.

Key target:

Halve the number of households living in temporary accommodation by 2010

The plan should understand the causes of homelessness and seek to include guidance that includes homes to meet the needs of the local population.

The SA Framework should include objectives that address housing issues including homelessness.

Climate Change Act (2008)

The Act commits the UK to action in mitigating the impacts of climate change. It has two key aims:

  • To improve carbon management, helping the transition towards a low-carbon economy

To demonstrate UK leadership internationally, signalling a commitment to take our share of responsibility for reducing global emissions in the context of developing negotiations on a post-2012 global agreement at Copenhagen in December 2009 [and beyond].

Relevant commitments within the Act are:

  • The creation of a legally binding target of at least an 80% cut in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, to be achieved through action in the UK and abroad (against 1990 levels). Also a reduction in emissions of at least 34% by 2020.

  • A carbon budgeting system which caps emissions over five-year periods, to aid progress towards the 2050 target.

  • The creation of the Committee on Climate Change - a new independent, expert body to advise the Government on the level of carbon budgets and on where cost-effective savings can be made.

  • The inclusion of International aviation and shipping emissions in the Act or an explanation to Parliament why not - by 31 December 2012.

  • Further measures to reduce emissions, including: powers to introduce domestic emissions trading schemes more quickly and easily through secondary legislation; measures on biofuels; powers to introduce pilot financial incentive schemes in England for household waste; powers to require a minimum charge for single-use carrier bags (excluding Scotland).

  • New powers to support the creation of a Community Energy Savings Programme.

The plan should ensure that policies are in place to encourage the reduction in CO2 emissions whilst promoting sustainable economic growth.

The SA Framework should include objectives that address climate change issues including flooding and the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Stern Review of the Economics of Climate Change (2006)

The review examines the evidence on the economic impacts of climate change and explores the economics of stabilising greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The second part of the review considers the complex policy challenges involved in managing the transition to a low-carbon economy and in ensuring that societies are able to adapt to the consequences of climate change.

The document clearly identifies that adaptation is the only available response for impacts that will occur over the next few decades.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan should ensure that policies are in place to encourage the reduction in CO2 emissions whilst promoting sustainable economic growth.

The SA Framework should include an objective relating to the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

UK Carbon Plan (2011)

The Carbon Plan sets out the Government's plans for achieving the emissions reductions committed to in the first four carbon budgets, on a pathway consistent with meeting the UK’s 2050 target. The publication brings together the Government's strategy to curb greenhouse gas emissions and deliver climate change targets.

The Carbon Plain includes the following targets:

Commitment to reduce carbon emissions by at least 80% by 2050.

It should be ensured that reducing carbon emissions is a key theme throughout the plan.

The SA Framework should include objectives that complement the priorities of this Plan.

Climate change and biodiversity adaptation: the role of the spatial planning system – a Natural England commissioned report (2009)

The report examines ways in which the land use planning system can help biodiversity adapt to climate change. Strategies are identified that enable LDFs to deliver against the Department for Food, Environment and Rural Affairs’ (Defra) 12 core adaptation goals:

  1. Conserve existing biodiversity

1a Conserve protected areas and other high quality habitats

1b Conserve range and ecological variability of habitats and species

  1. Reduce sources of harm not linked to climate

  2. Develop ecologically resilient and varied landscapes

3a Conserve and enhance local variation within sites and habitats

3b Make space for the natural development of rivers and coasts

  1. Establish ecological networks through habitat protection, restoration and creation

  2. Make sound decisions based on analysis

5a Thoroughly analyse causes of change

5b Respond to changing conservation priorities

6 Integrate adaptation and mitigation measures into conservation management, planning and practice

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

Development of the plan should include recommendations from this report. Biodiversity assets should be protected from inappropriate development and i.e. use of buffer zones around sensitive sites.

The SA should refer to specific guidance in the document for using SA to improve the ability of biodiversity to adapt to climate change.

Planning for Climate Change – Guidance and Model Policies for Local Authorities (2010)

The document has been produced by the Planning and Climate Change Coalition, a group of organisations seeking to ensure that the planning system responds effectively to the climate challenge.

The guide is designed to provide clarity and guidance to local authorities and Local Enterprise Partnerships on how best to plan for climate change, both in terms of reducing CO2 emissions, and adapting to future climatic conditions.

Guidance is provided on developing both strategic and development control policies.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance, other than to support local authorities in mitigating and adapting to climate change.

The guidance should be followed when developing Local Plan in order to address climate change issues.

The SA should examine the likely effectiveness of the plan in mitigating and adapting to climate change. Such judgements should be made with reference to the guidance.

Energy White Paper: Meeting the Energy Challenge (2007)

This White Paper sets out a framework for action to address the following long-term energy challenges, and helps to manage the risks:

  • Tackling climate change by reducing CO2 emissions both within the UK and abroad

  • Ensuring secure, clean and affordable energy as we become increasingly dependent on imported fuel

As set out in ‘The Energy Challenge’ published in 2006, the context in which the Government is seeking to meet these challenges is evolving.

This paper sets out the Government’s international and domestic energy strategy (based upon existing policies) to address the long-term energy challenges and deliver the four energy policy goals [set out in the 2003 Energy White Paper]. It sets out how the Government is implementing the measures in the Energy Review Report in 2006 together with other measures announced since (e.g. in the 2007 Budget).

Targets are superseded by 2008 Climate Change Act. There is therefore none of relevance.

The plan should encourage the reduction in CO2 emissions whilst promoting sustainable economic growth.

The SA Framework should include an objective relating to the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

Energy Act 2013

The Act sets out new legislation to:

  • Reflect the availability of new technologies (such as CCS and emerging renewable technologies)

  • Correspond with our changing requirements for security of supply infrastructure (such as offshore gas storage)

  • Ensure adequate protection for the environment and the tax payer as our energy market changes.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan should ensure that policies are in place to encourage the reduction in CO2 emissions whilst promoting sustainable economic growth.

The SA Framework should include an objective relating to minimising greenhouse gas emissions.

Delivering a Sustainable Transport System (2008)

The document explains how the strategic aims set out in ‘Towards a Sustainable Transport System’ (2007) will be translated into policy and practical actions. It takes on recommendations contained in the Eddington transport study and the Stern Review. The 5 goals are:

  • To support national economic competitiveness and growth, by delivering reliable and efficient transport networks;

  • To reduce transport’s emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases, with the desired outcome of tackling climate change;

  • To contribute to better safety, security and health and longer life expectancy by reducing the risk of death, injury or illness arising from transport, and by promoting travel modes that are beneficial to health;

  • To promote greater equality of opportunity for all citizens, with the desired outcome of achieving a fairer society; and

To improve quality of life for transport users and non-transport users, and to promote a healthy natural environment.

The document does not contain specific targets or indicators, but rather sets out broad strategic priorities at a national level. Nonetheless, the goals provide a framework for local as well as national action.

The plan should recognise the importance of safe, reliable and efficient transport systems to economic and social wellbeing. The sustainability impacts of transport should also be fully understood.

The SA Framework should ensure inclusion of objectives that promote sustainable transport.

The Future of Transport White Paper – A Network for 2030 (2004)

This Paper builds on the progress that has already been made since the implementation of the 10 Year Plan for transport, and sets out the vision for transport for the next 30 years, until 2015, with a funding commitment. It is a long term strategy for a modern, efficient and sustainable transport system backed up by sustained high levels of investment.

The aim is for a transport network that can meet the challenges of a growing economy and the increasing demand for travel, but that can also achieve environmental objectives. This means coherent networks with:

  • The road network providing a more reliable and freer-flowing service for both personal travel and freight, with people able to make informed choices about how and when they travel

  • The rail network providing a fast, reliable and efficient service, particularly for interurban journeys and commuting into large urban areas

  • Reliable, flexible, convenient bus services tailored to local needs

  • Making walking and cycling a real alternative for local trips

  • Ports and airports providing improved international and domestic links

The strategy is built around three key themes:

  • Sustained investment over the long term

  • Improvements in transport management

  • Planning ahead sustained

Underlining these themes, and an important underlying objective of our strategy, is balancing the need to travel with the need to improve quality of life. This means seeking solutions that meet long term economic, social and environmental goals. Achieving this objective will contribute to the objectives of the UK Sustainable Development Strategy.

The document indicates a number of Public Service Agreement objectives. Those of relevance include;

  • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 12.5% below 1990 levels in line with our Kyoto commitment and move towards a 20% reduction in CO2 emissions below 1990 levels by 2010, through measures including energy efficiency and renewables.

Improve air quality by meeting the Air Quality Strategy targets for carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen dioxide, particles, sulphur dioxide, benzene and 1,3 butadiene.

The plan should recognise the need for an integrated and sustainable transport network.

The SA Framework should contain objectives that support an efficient and sustainable transport system, and also cover issues relating to the protection of air quality and greenhouse gas emissions.

Low Carbon Transport: A Greener Future - A Carbon Reduction Strategy for Transport (July 2009)

The Strategy sets out how the transport sector will meet its emissions reduction obligations and contribute to the Government’s overall policy on climate change as set out in the Climate Change Act 2008.

The Strategy does not contain its own targets; rather it sets out how those committed to elsewhere, notably in the Climate Change Act 2008, will be met by the transport sector and what actions the Government will take to see they are met.

The plan should promote low-carbon transport. This may require the use of new and emerging technology as well as promoting a modal shift in transport choices.

The SA should seek the promotion of low-carbon forms of transport.

Wildlife and Countryside Act (1981) (as amended)

The Act still forms the basis of conservation legislation in Great Britain, although it has been much modified.

Schedules 5 and 8 of the Act detail lists of legally protected wild animals and plants respectively. These are updated every five years.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan must ensure that the requirements of the Act are complied with and that species and habitats are protected.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to the protection and enhancement of biodiversity resources.

The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations (2010)

The purpose of the Act is to create a new statutory right of access on foot to certain types of open land, to modernise the public rights of way system, to strengthen nature conservation legislation, and to facilitate better management of Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONBs).

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

It is essential that the development of the plan should consider biodiversity protection.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to the protection and enhancement of biodiversity resources.

The Countryside and Rights of Way (CRoW) Act (2000)

The purpose of the Act is to create a new statutory right of access on foot to certain types of open land, to modernise the public rights of way system, to strengthen nature conservation legislation, and to facilitate better management of Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONBs).

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

It is essential that the development of the plan should consider biodiversity protection.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to the protection and enhancement of biodiversity resources.

The Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act (2006)

The act created Natural England and the Commission for Rural Communities and, amongst other measures, it extended the biodiversity duty set out in the Countryside and Rights of Way (CROW) Act to public bodies and statutory undertakers to ensure due regard to the conservation of biodiversity.

The Duty is set out in Section 40 of the Act, and states that every public authority must, in exercising its functions, have regard, so far as is consistent with the proper exercise of those functions, to the purpose of conserving biodiversity.

The aim of the biodiversity duty is to raise the profile of biodiversity in England and Wales, so that the conservation of biodiversity becomes properly embedded in all relevant policies and decisions made by public authorities.

The Duty applies to all local authorities, community, parish and town councils, police, fire and health authorities and utility companies.

The Government has produced guidance on implementing the Duty, contained in two publications, one for Local Authorities (and the other for other public bodies.

Section 41 of the NERC Act 2006, lists species and habitats of principal importance that local authorities must have regard for.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

It is essential that the development of the plan considers the provisions of the biodiversity duty.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to the protection and enhancement of biodiversity resources.

The Guidance for Local Authorities on Implementing the Biodiversity Duty (2007)

This guidance was issued by Defra and the Welsh Assembly to assist local authorities in fulfilling their Biodiversity Duty.

The guidance references a biodiversity indicator, which was developed as a result of a Defra commissioned research project in 2003/4. The indicator developed to measure local authority performance is:

‘Progress towards achieving a local authority’s potential for biodiversity’, which is based on four sub-indicators relating to:

  • The management of local authority landholdings (e.g. % of landholdings managed to a plan which seeks to maximise the sites’ biodiversity potential.

  • The condition of local authority managed SSSIs (e.g. % of SSSI in ‘favourable’ or ‘unfavourable recovering’ condition).

  • The provision of accessible greenspace.

  • The effect of development control decisions on designated sites (e.g. change in designated sites as a result of planning permissions).

It is essential that the development of the plan considers the provisions of the biodiversity duty.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to the protection and enhancement of biodiversity resources.

Conserving Biodiversity – The UK Approach (2007)

The purpose of the document is to set out the vision and approach to conserving biodiversity within the UK’s devolved framework. It sets out an approach to biodiversity conservation that is designed to meet the commitment to halt the loss of biodiversity by 2010 but also to guide action into the second decade of the 21st century.

The statement emphasises an ecosystem approach. There is a close relationship between ecosystems and human well-being and there is a need to take action to reverse ecosystem degradation by addressing the key drivers and valuing ecosystem services. There is a need to maintain, create and restore functional combinations of habitats.

The shared priorities for action are:

  • Protecting the best sites for wildlife

  • Targeting action on priority species and habitats

  • Embedding proper consideration of biodiversity and ecosystem services in all relevant sectors of policy and decision-making.

  • Engaging people and encouraging behaviour change

  • Developing and interpreting the evidence base

Ensuring that the UK plays a proactive role in influencing the development of Multilateral Environmental Agreements and contributes fully to their domestic delivery.

In June 2007 the UK Biodiversity Partnership published 18 indicators that can be used to monitor biodiversity progress across the UK. They will be used as part of a wider evidence base to determine whether the target to halt biodiversity loss is being achieved. Some of the relevant indicators include:

  • Trends in populations of selected species of birds and butterflies

  • UK BAP Priority Species & Habitats

  • Protected areas

  • Sustainable woodland management

  • Area of agri-environment land

  • Sustainable fisheries

  • Ecological impact of air pollution

  • Invasive species

  • Habitat connectivity

River quality

It is essential that the development of the plan should consider biodiversity protection.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to the protection of biodiversity resources.

Biodiversity 2020: A strategy for England’s wildlife and ecosystem services (2011)

This new, ambitious biodiversity strategy for England builds on the Natural Environment White Paper and provides a comprehensive picture of how we are implementing our international and EU commitments. It sets out the strategic direction for biodiversity policy for the next decade on land (including rivers and lakes)5 and at sea. It builds on the successful work that has gone before, but also seeks to deliver a real step change.

The mission for this strategy, for the next decade, is:

  • To halt overall biodiversity loss, support healthy well-functioning ecosystems and establish coherent ecological networks, with more and better places for nature for the benefit of wildlife and people.

The document sets out 5 strategic goals which include targets in which flexible framework is given to inform the establishment of national plans, taking into account national circumstances and priorities.

  • Strategic goal A: address the underlying causes of biodiversity loss by mainstreaming biodiversity cross government and society

  • Strategic goal B: reducing the direct pressures on biodiversity and promote sustainable use

  • Strategic goal C: improve the status of biodiversity by safeguarding ecosystems, species and genetic diversity

  • Strategic goal D: enhance the benefits to all from biodiversity and ecosystem services

  • Strategic goal E :enhance implementation through participatory planning, knowledge management and capacity building

It is essential that the development of the plan should consider biodiversity protection.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to the protection of biodiversity resources

UK Biodiversity Action Plan (1994)

This Plan has been prepared in response to Article 6 of the Biodiversity Convention, to develop national strategies for the conservation of biological diversity and the sustainable use of biological resources. The Action Plan is monitored, reviewed and updated when required.

The overall goal of the UKBAP is ‘To conserve and enhance biological diversity within the UK and to contribute to the conservation of global biodiversity through all appropriate mechanisms’.

Its underlying principles are:

  • Where biological resources are used, such use should be sustainable

  • Wise use should be ensured for non-renewable resources

  • The conservation of biodiversity requires the care and involvement of individuals and communities as well as Governmental processes

  • Conservation of biodiversity should be an integral part of Government programmes, policy and action

  • Conservation practice and policy should be based upon a sound knowledge base

  • The precautionary principle should guide decisions

The objectives for conserving biodiversity are:

  • To conserve and where practicable to enhance:

  1. the overall populations and natural ranges of native species and the quality and range of wildlife habitats and ecosystems

  2. internationally important and threatened species, habitats and ecosystems

  3. species, habitats and natural and managed ecosystems that are characteristic of local areas

  4. the biodiversity of natural and semi-natural habitats where this has been diminished over recent past decades

  • To increase public awareness of, and involvement in, conserving biodiversity.

To contribute to the conservation of biodiversity on a European and global scale.

The plan contains 1150 species and 65 habitats that have been listed as priorities for conservation action under the UK Biodiversity Action Plan (UK BAP).

Specific targets are established for each of these action plans which are considered too detailed for this PPP review.

It is essential that the development of the plan should consider biodiversity protection.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to the protection of biodiversity resources.

Biodiversity by Design: A Guide for Sustainable Communities (Town and Country Planning Association) (2004)

The aim of the guide is to provide guidance on how to maximise the opportunities for biodiversity in the planning and design of sustainable communities. The guidance is designed to apply at a variety of scales from whole sub-region growth points, to neighbourhood schemes.

This is a guidance document and therefore does not set targets or identify indicators.

The plan should recognise the multi-functional nature of open space. The plan should seek to protect and enhance biodiversity resources and open space.

The SA Framework should seek to protect European, national and locally designated sites along with areas of open space.

UK Post-2010 Biodiversity Framework 2012

This framework was produced to set out the common purpose and shared priorities of members to address biodiversity loss and decline in the UK.

The document sets out four key strategic targets:

  • Address the underlying causes of biodiversity loss by mainstreaming biodiversity across government and society. This goal includes targets for public awareness, integrating biodiversity

  • Reduce the direct pressures on biodiversity and promote sustainable use.

  • To improve the status of biodiversity by safeguarding ecosystems, species and genetic diversity.

Enhance the benefits to all from biodiversity and ecosystems.

The plan should recognise the importance of arresting biodiversity decline and aim to protect and enhance it.

The SA should contain objectives relating to arresting biodiversity loss/decline.

Biodiversity Indicators in Your Pocket (2010) Defra

These indicators show changes in aspects of biodiversity such as the population size of important species or the area of land managed for wildlife. They provide part of the evidence to assess whether the targets set out in the following column have been achieved.

The UK Government committed to two important international targets to protect biodiversity:

1. In 2001, European Union Heads of State or Government agreed that biodiversity decline should be halted, with the aim of reaching this objective by 2010.

2. In 2002, Heads of State at the United Nations World Summit on Sustainable Development committed themselves to achieve, by 2010, a significant reduction of the current rate of biodiversity loss at the global, regional and national level, as a contribution to poverty alleviation and to the benefit of all life on Earth.

There are eighteen UK biodiversity indicators grouped under six focal areas aligned to those used by the Convention on Biological Diversity:

1. Status and trends in components of biodiversity

2. Sustainable use

3. Threats to biodiversity

4. Ecosystem integrity and ecosystem goods and services

5. Status of resource transfers and use

6. Public awareness and participation

The plan should include indicators relating to biodiversity in order to monitor progress.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to biodiversity and the quality of the natural environment.

A Strategy for England’s Trees, Woodlands and Forests (2007)

The strategy has a 10 – 15 year timescale and strives to achieve sustainable forest management.

There are five aims identified for Government intervention in trees, woods and forests. The aims are:

  • To provide a resource of trees, woods and forests where they can contribute most in terms of environmental, economic and social benefits now and in the future.

  • To ensure that existing and newly-planted trees, woods and forests are resilient to the impacts of climate change and also contribute to the way in which biodiversity and natural resources adjust to climate change.

  • To protect and enhance the environmental resources of water, soil, air, biodiversity and landscapes and the cultural and amenity values of trees and woodland.

  • To increase the contribution that trees, woods and forests make to the quality of life for those living, working and visiting England.

To improve the competitiveness of woodland businesses and to promote new or improved markets for sustainable woodland products.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

It is essential that the development of the plan should consider biodiversity protection.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to the protection of biodiversity resources, which includes areas of woodland, particularly ancient woodland.

Open Space Strategies: Best Practice Guidance (CABE and the Greater London Authority, 2009)

This document offers clear, practical guidance to local authorities and their stakeholders on how to prepare an open space strategy.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan should recognise the multi-functional benefits of open space.

The SA should consider the potential for impacts on open spaces and opportunities for enhancements.

Heritage in Local Plans: How to create a sound plan under the NPPF (2012)

This document is a guide to local authorities from English Heritage on how to achieve the objectives of the NPPF for the historic environment and thereby pass the test for a sound local plan.

This is an advisory document and does not set targets or identify indicators.

The plan should accommodate the guidance of this document relating to heritage in local planning.

The SA framework should seek to take on the advice of this document in regards to heritage in local planning.

The Geological Conservation Review (GCR) (ongoing)

The GCR is designed to identify sites of national and international importance needed to show all the key scientific elements of the Earth heritage of Britain. They display sediments, rocks, fossils, and features of the landscape that make a special contribution to our understanding and appreciation of Earth science and the geological history of Britain

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan should recognise the status of GCR sites in the borough and aim to protect this and other geodiversity sites.

The SA should consider potential impacts on geodiversity.

Safeguarding our Soils: A Strategy for England (Defra, 2009)

Vision: By 2030, all England’s soils will be managed sustainably and degradation threats tackled successfully. This will improve the quality of England’s soils and safeguard their ability to provide essential services for future generations.

The Strategy sets out how Government intends to improve the management of soil to manage threats to its quality and integrity.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan should include measures to ensure that soils are protected in line with the Strategy’s aims. In addition the protection of valuable soil resources should be promoted within the plan.

The assessment should consider the extent to which soils may be impacted by proposals supported within the plan.

Natural England’s Green Infrastructure Guidance (2009)

The guidance outlines the benefits of developing multi-functional green infrastructure. It provides advice to local authorities on how to deliver green infrastructure improvements through the planning system, including reference to LDFs.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan should protect existing green infrastructure and promote new multi-functional green spaces. Guidance should be followed where possible.

The assessment should consider the impact of plan on the quality and quantity of green infrastructure and the extent to which the guidance has been followed.

Accessible Natural Green Space Standards in Towns and Cities: A Review and Toolkit for their Implementation (2003) and Nature Nearby: Accessible Green Space Guidance (2010)

These publications by Natural England explain and give guidance on the concept of Accessible Natural Green Space Standards (ANGSt). The 2010 report provides practical advice to planning authorities on meeting the standards within new and existing developments.

ANGSt recommends that everyone, wherever they live, should have an accessible natural greenspace:

  • of at least 2ha in size, no more than 300m (5 minutes walk) from home;

  • at least one accessible 20ha site within 2km of home;

  • one accessible 100ha site within 5km of home; and

  • one accessible 500ha site within 10km of home; plus

a minimum of 1ha of statutory Local Nature Reserves per thousand population.

The plan should attempt to ensure that the standards are met within the borough.

The SA Framework should contain an objective relating to the provision of green space.

Heritage White Paper: Heritage protection for the 21st century (2007)

This White Paper responds to the public call for change, and to this changing policy context. It sets out our vision for a new heritage protection system. Our proposals are based on a unified vision of the historic environment that enables a simpler and more efficient system. They are focussed on opening up heritage protection to greater public scrutiny and involvement. And they recognise that heritage protection needs to be an integral part of a planning system that can deliver sustainable communities.

The proposals in this White Paper reflect the importance of the heritage protection system in preserving our heritage for people to enjoy now and in the future. They are based around three core principles:

• Developing a unified approach to the historic environment;

• Maximising opportunities for inclusion and involvement; and

• Supporting sustainable communities by putting the historic environment at the heart of an effective planning system.

The plan will need to take on board the issues and themes that have been identified in the document.

The SA Framework should include objectives that relate to the protection and enhancement of the historic environment.

The Air Quality Strategy for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland (2007)

The Strategy sets out air quality objectives and policy options to further improve air quality in the UK to deliver environmental, health and social benefits.

It examines the costs and benefits of air quality improvement proposals, the impact of exceedances of the strategy’s air quality objectives, the effect on ecosystems and the qualitative impacts.

The Strategy sets objectives and targets for each air quality pollutant, e.g. to achieve and maintain 40?g/m-3 ofannual average nitrogen dioxide.

The plan should consider the maintenance of good air quality and the measures that can be taken to improve it. For example, promotion of Green Travel Plans.

The SA Framework should include objectives that address the protection of air quality.

Water Resources Strategy for England and Wales (2009)

This is a strategy produced by the Environment Agency (EA) and applies to both England and Wales. It forms the EA’s strategy for water resource management for the next 25 years.

The focus of the strategy is understanding the present state of water resources and planning for the management of water resources to prevent long-term environmental damage and degradation. The strategy highlights where water abstractions are unsustainable and where further water is needed. The issue of climate change and its impact upon our water resources is also considered.

30 action points are identified to deliver the strategy, which include developing leakage control, encouraging good practice when using water and promoting the value of water.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan needs to consider the protection and enhancement of water resources.

The SA Framework should include objectives that promote the protection of the water environment.

Future Water: The Government’s Water Strategy for England (2008)

Defra’s vision for the state of the water environment in 2030 is for:

  • an improved quality of the water environment and the ecology which it supports, and continued high levels of drinking water quality;

  • sustainably managed risks from flooding and coastal erosion, with greater understanding and more effective management of surface water;

  • sustainable use of water resources, and implemented fair, affordable and cost reflective water charges;

  • reduced greenhouse gas emissions; and

  • an embedded continuous adaptation to climate change and other pressures across the water industry and water users.

The Strategy contains few quantitative targets. It sets out broad ambitions for improvements in the areas of water demand, supply, quality, surface water drainage, flooding, greenhouse gas emissions, water charging and the regulatory framework.

One headline target is to reduce per capita consumption of water to an average of 130 litres per person per day by 2030, or possibly even 120 litres per person per day depending on new technological developments and innovation.

The plan should help to support the aims of this Strategy through requiring high levels of protection for the water environment.

The SA Framework should contain objectives related to water resources, flooding and climate change.

Flood and Water Management Act (2010)

The Act will provide better, more comprehensive management of coastal erosion and flood risk for people, homes and businesses. It also contains financial provisions related to the water industry.

The Act will give the EA an overview of all flood and coastal erosion risk management and unitary and county councils the lead in managing the risk of local floods. It will also enable better management of water resources and quality, and will help to manage and respond to severe weather events such as flood and drought.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan should consider flood risk issues. It should seek to avoid siting new development in floodplain and ensure the sustainable use of water resources.

The SA Framework should include objectives, targets and indicators that address flooding risk and the need to manage run-off effectively.

Making Space for Water: Taking Forward a New Government Strategy for Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management (2005)

This strategy has a 20 year time horizon and seeks to implement a more holistic strategy to flood and coastal erosion risks.

The aim is to manage risks by employing an integrated portfolio of approaches which reflect both national and local priorities to reduce the threat to people and their property and to deliver the greatest environmental, social and economic benefits

A whole catchment and whole shoreline approach will be adopted and adaptation to climate change will be an inherent part of flood and coastal erosion decisions.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan needs to ensure that development in floodplains is discouraged.

The SA Framework should include objectives, targets and indicators that address flooding risk and the need to manage runoff effectively.

Waste Strategy for England (2007)

The aim has to be to reduce waste by making products with fewer natural resources. The link between economic growth and waste growth must be broken. Most products should be re-used or their materials recycled. Energy should be recovered where possible. Land filling of residual waste, in small amounts, may be necessary.

The strategy highlights that significant progress has been made since the 2000 strategy. However, performance still lags behind other European countries.

The Government’s key objectives are:

  • To decouple waste growth from economic growth and put more emphasis upon waste prevention and re-use.

  • Meet and exceed the Landfill Directive diversion targets for biodegradable municipal waste in 2010, 2013 and 2020.

  • Increase diversion from landfill of non-municipal waste and secure better integration of treatment for municipal and non-municipal waste.

  • Secure the investment in infrastructure needed to divert waste from landfill and for the management of hazardous waste.

Get the most environmental benefit from investment through increased recycling of resources and recovery of energy from residual waste using a mix of technologies.

The strategy includes targets for reducing household waste production but these are not relevant to this PPP review.

The strategy expects a reduction of commercial and industrial waste going to landfill by at least 20% by 2010 compared to 2004.

A number of indicators are used in the strategy to characterise current waste management in England.

The plan should seek to ensure sustainable waste management.

The SA Framework should include objectives, indicators and targets that address sustainable waste management issues.

The Egan Review – Skills for Sustainable Communities (2004)

Sustainable communities meet the diverse needs of existing and future residents, their children and other users, contribute to a high quality of life and provide opportunity and choice. They achieve this in ways that make effective use of natural resources, enhance the environment, promote social cohesion and inclusion and strengthen economic prosperity.”

The key components of sustainable communities are:

  • Governance – effective and inclusive participation, representation and leadership.

  • Transport and connectivity – Good transport services and communications linking people to jobs, schools, health and other services.

  • Services – a full range of appropriate, accessible public, private community and voluntary services.

  • Environmental – providing places for people to live in an environmentally friendly way.

  • Economy – A flourishing and diverse local economy.

  • Housing and the Built Environment – a quality built and natural environment

Social and cultural – vibrant, harmonious and inclusive communities.

A series of indicators are defined for each of the key components to monitor progress. These include:

  • % of population who live in wards that rank within the most deprived 10% and 25% of wards in the country.

  • % of residents surveyed and satisfied with their neighbourhoods as a place to live.

  • % of respondents surveyed who feel they ‘belong’ to the neighbourhood (or community).

  • Domestic burglaries per 1000 households and % detected.

  • % of adults surveyed who feel they can influence decisions affecting their local area.

  • Household energy use (gas and electricity) per household.

  • % people satisfied with waste recycling facilities.

  • Average no. of days where air pollution is moderate or higher for NO2, SO2, O3, CO or PM10.

  • No. of unfit homes per 1,000 dwellings.

  • % of listed building of Grade I and II* at risk of decay.

  • % of residents surveyed finding it easy to access key local services.

  • % of people of working age in employment (with BME breakdown).

  • Average life expectancy.

No. of primary care professionals per 100,000 population.

The plan should include policies that support the principles of the Egan Review and seek to develop sustainable communities.

There are a number of objectives and indicators in the document that should be integrated into the SA Framework.

Working for a Healthier Tomorrow – Dame Carol Black’s Review of the health of Britain’s working age population (2008)

This Review sets out the first ever baseline for the health of Britain’s working age population, seeking to lay the foundations for urgent and comprehensive reform through a new vision for health and work in Britain. Three principles lie at the heart of this vision:

  • Prevention of illness and promotion of health and well-being

  • Early intervention for those who develop a health condition

  • An improvement in the health of those out of work so that everyone with the potential to work has the support they need to do so

The Review recognises the human, social and economic costs of impaired health and well-being in relation to working life in Britain. The aim of the Review is not to offer a utopian solution for improved health in working life, but more to identify the factors that stand in the way of good health and to elicit interventions (including services, changes in attitudes, behaviours and practices) that can help to overcome them.

Monitoring the baseline presented in this Review will be critical, together with a research programme to inform future action with a comprehensive evidence base and increased cross-governmental effort to ensure progress.

Although there are no relevant targets within the Review, it presents a number of indicators of working age health, which include:

  • Life expectancy

  • Mortality during working age

  • % of the working age population being in good, fairly good or poor health

  • Proportion of people out of work due to sickness or disability

  • Sickness absence per annum

  • Sickness notes issued per medical condition

  • % of working time lost due to sickness

  • Proportion of the working age population on incapacity benefits

  • Employment rate

  • Employment rate for disabled people

  • Income rates

  • Economic inactivity and reasons for inactivity, split into those inactive who would like to work and those seeking work

  • Proportion of deviation from perfect health by social class (Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY) health measure) and work status

  • Proportion of adult population who smoke

  • Work related illness by industry

  • Proportion of working age population with mental health conditions

  • Incapacity benefits claimants by primary medical condition

Costs of working age ill health

The plan should consider issues relating to human health.

The SA Framework should include objectives that seek to protect human health and reduce health inequalities.

Health Effects of Climate Change in the UK 2008 – An update of the Department of Health Report 2001/2002

The 2001/2 Report and its update seek to provide quantitative estimates of the possible impacts of climate change on health. It is recognised that there could be significant long-term health effects as a result of climate change.

Since the original report, the assessment of future climate change has been updated. A new generation of high-resolution climate models has allowed for improved estimates of future changes in the frequency, intensity and duration of extreme events in the UK. Some of the major areas of concern are:

  • Flooding

  • Vector-borne diseases

  • Food-borne diseases

  • The effects of climate change on drinking water supplies

  • The direct effects of high temperatures

  • The air pollution climate

Exposure to ultra-violet light

A number of indicators are presented in this Report. The key ones include:

  • Mean annual temperature

  • Number of days per year with daily mean exceeding 20oC

  • Number of days per year with daily mean below 0oC

  • Annual total rainfall

  • Seasonal rainfall

  • Maximum daily wind speed

  • Annual highest maximum daily wind speed

Annual cases of malaria

The plan should address the issues relating to climate change, and the need to encourage provision of high quality and flexible health services.

The SA Framework should include objectives that address climate change issues including flooding and the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It should also include an objective related to human health.

Local Air Quality Management – Consultation on options to improve air quality management in England (July 2013)

The consultation document was prepared by Defra and it aims to improve local air quality management. It recognises that local authorities have an important part to play in helping to improve air quality and in working towards EU standards. This includes coordinating local assessment and action; taking air quality into account when undertaking transport functions, ensuring the planning system is deployed to limit deterioration of air quality (or exposure) and where possible to improve air quality and promote the public health benefits of good air quality.

Local Air Quality Objectives are presented in Annex 1 of this consultation document:

  • Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) - 200 ?g/m3 (not to be exceeded more than 18 times a year – 1 hour mean

  • Particles (PM10) – 50 ?g/m3 not to be exceeded more than 35 times a year – 24 hour mean

  • Sulphur Dioxide – 350 ?g/m3 not to be exceeded more than 24 times a year – 1 hour mean

The plan should address the issues relating to air quality, and the need to encourage sustainable travel modes, e.g. walking, cycling, public transport.

The SA Framework should include objectives that address air quality issues. It should also include an objective related to human health.

Tackling Health Inequalities – A Programme for Action 2003 (Including the 2007 Status Report on the Programme for Action)

This Programme for Action was prepared by the Department of Health, setting out plans for the following three years to tackle health inequalities that are found across different geographical areas, between genders and different ethnic communities and also between different social and economic groups. It established the foundations required to achieve the challenging national target to reduce the gap in infant mortality across social groups, and raise life expectancy in the most disadvantaged areas faster than elsewhere, by 2010.

The programme was organised around four themes:

  • Supporting families, mothers and children – to ensure the best possible start in life and break the inter-generational cycle of health

  • Engaging communities and individuals – to ensure relevance, responsiveness and sustainability

  • Preventing illness and providing effective treatment and care – making certain that the NHS provides leadership and makes the contribution to reducing inequalities that is expected of it

  • Addressing the underlying determinants of health – dealing with the long-term underlying causes of health inequalities

These themes are underpinned by discrete principles to guide how health inequalities are tackled in practice.

The programme sets out an ambitious agenda including targets and milestones, in order to help to reduce inequalities by progressing against the 2010 national target and also tackling the underlying causes in the future.

The Programme for Action presents a number of national headline indicators that can be attributed to health inequality, including the following:

  • Number of primary care professionals per 100,000 population

  • Road accident casualties in disadvantaged communities

  • Proportion of children living in low-income households

  • Proportion of those aged 16 who get qualifications equivalent to 5 GCSEs at grades A* to C

  • Proportion of households living in non-decent housing

  • Prevalence of smoking among people in manual social groups, and among pregnant women

Age-standardised death rates per 100,000 population for the major killer diseases (cancer, circulatory diseases), ages under 75 (for the 20% of areas with the highest rates compared to the national average)

The plan should consider issues relating to human health.

The SA Framework should include objectives that seek to protect human health and reduce health inequalities.

Water for People and the Environment: A Strategy for England and Wales (2009)

This strategy sets out how the Environment Agency believe water resources should be managed throughout England and Wales to 2050 and beyond to ensure that there will be enough water for people and the environment.

This Strategy includes many targets from other plans and policies including:

The Housing Green Paper, 13 published in July 2007, set new long term housing targets for England – to provide two million homes by 2016 and three million homes by 2020.

  • The food industry has committed to reduce water consumption by 20 per cent by 2020.

  • The Carbon Reduction Commitment aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by four million tonnes per year by 2020, helping achieve reduction targets outlined in the Climate Change Act.

  • The UK has a green energy target of 15 per cent by 2020.

  • The Government in England has set a target for its own departments to achieve a 30 per cent reduction in their carbon emissions by 2020. The Environment Agency has set themselves a target to achieve this reduction by 2012.

The England and Wales annual target of saving water is 23 Ml/d.

The plan should consider how the water environment can be protected and enhanced, and include policies that promote the sustainable use of water resources.

The SA Framework should include objectives that consider effects upon water quality and resource.

National Planning Policy Framework March 2012

The National Planning Policy Framework sets out the Government’s economic, environmental and social planning policies for England. Taken together, these policies articulate the Government’s vision of sustainable development, which should be interpreted and applied locally to meet local aspirations.

The Government aims to achieve sustainable development through:

  • Building a strong, competitive economy

  • Ensuring the vitality of town centres

  • Supporting a prosperous rural economy

  • Promoting sustainable transport

  • Supporting high quality communications infrastructure

  • Delivering a wide choice of high quality homes

  • Requiring good design

  • Promoting healthy communities

  • Protecting green belt land

  • Meeting the challenge of climate change, flooding and coastal change

  • Conserving and enhancing the natural environment

  • Conserving and enhancing the historic environment

  • Facilitating the sustainable use of minerals

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan should adhere to the principles of the Planning Policy Framework ensuring that all aspects of the core land-use planning principles underpin the Local Plan.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to economic, environmental and social issues.

Localism Act 2011

The Localism Act contains a number of proposals to give local authorities new freedoms and flexibility shifting power from the central state. In summary the Act gives:

  • New freedoms and flexibilities for local government;

  • Gives local authorities everywhere the formal legal ability and greater confidence to get on with the job of responding to what local people want

  • Cuts red tape to enable councillors everywhere to play a full and active part in local life without fear of legal challenge

  • Encourages a new generation of powerful leaders with the potential to raise the profile of English cities, strengthen local democracy and boost economic growth

  • Enables ministers to transfer functions to public authorities in cities in order to harness their potential to drive growth and prosperity

  • New rights and powers for local communities

  • Makes it easier for local people to take over the amenities they love and keep them part of local life

  • Ensures that local social enterprises, volunteers and community groups with a bright idea for improving local services get a chance to change how things are done

  • Enables local residents to call local authorities to account for the careful management of taxpayers’ money

  • Reform to make the planning system clearer, more democratic and more effective

  • Places significantly more influence in the hands of local people over issues that make a big difference to their lives

  • Provides appropriate support and recognition to communities who welcome new development

  • Reduces red tape, making it easier for authorities to get on with the job of working with local people to draw up a vision for their area’s future

  • Reinforces the democratic nature of the planning system - passing power from bodies not directly answerable to the public, to democratically accountable ministers

  • Reform to ensure that decisions about housing are taken locally

  • Enables local authorities to make their own decisions to adapt housing provision to local needs, and make the system fairer and more effective

  • Gives local authorities more control over the funding of social housing, helping them to plan for the long term

  • Gives people who live in social housing new ways of holding their landlords to account, and make it easier for them to move

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The plan should be mindful of the key principles of this Act.

The SA Framework should be mindful of this Act as its principles will help to create vibrant, cohesive and empowered communities.

PPS10: Planning for Sustainable Waste Management (Revised March 2011)

Positive planning has an important role in delivering sustainable waste management through the development of appropriate strategies for growth, regeneration and the prudent use of resources, and by providing sufficient opportunities for new waste management facilities of the right type, in the right place and at the right time.

The PPS and the accompanying guidance sets out Government advice to local authorities on the role they should play in supporting national waste planning and policy and ensuring that greater local responsibility is taken for minimising waste and promoting sustainable waste management. The concerns of local groups should be considered when siting sensitive waste management facilities.

There are no specific targets or indicators of relevance.

The waste policy elements of the plan need to be developed in accordance with national policy.

The SA Framework should include objectives that promote sustainable waste management.

Building for Life 12 (2012)

This document provides the standard for well-designed homes and neighborhoods which local communities, local authorities and developers can utilise to stimulate conversations about creating good places to live. The document comprises 12 questions split over three categories to establish the quality of the project.

Although not strict targets, the aim is for buildings to gain as many ‘green lights’ to 12 questions in three key areas:

  • Integrating into the neighbourhood

  • Creating a place

  • Street and home

The plan should be mindful of recommendation in the document how to improve homes, neighbourhoods and communities.

The SA should include objectives around generating buildings, neighbourhoods and communities which flourish

Europe 2020: UK National Reform Programme 2013 (April 2013)

The Programme sets out actions that the government is taking to address the structural reform challenges facing the UK, in line with a set of Country Specific Recommendations agreed by Heads of State or government at the European Council in June 2012. The NRP summarises relevant new announcements and reports on the impact of policies already implemented. It documents reports on progress in broad policy areas covered by five headline EU-level targets under the Europe 2020 Strategy, relating to employment, education, poverty reduction, research and innovation, and energy and climate change.

The document provides a progress update and puts forward overarching aims for the UK going forward around five key areas:

  • Employment

  • Education

  • Poverty reduction

  • Research and innovation

  • Climate Change

The plan should be aware of the key strategies put forward by this document and endeavour to incorporate those relevant within it.

The SA should include objectives around improvement in the five key areas outlined in this document.

Summary of Regional, County and Local Plans and Programmes

Regional, County and Local Plans

Key Objectives Relevant to Plan and SA

Key Targets and Indicators Relevant to Plan and SA

Implications for Plan

Implications for SA

A Sustainable Development Framework For The East Of England (2001)

Sets out the vision for the East England, which aims to improve the quality of life for people in the region which is sustainable in the long term future.

To achieve sustainable levels of prosperity and economic growth.

To deliver more sustainable patterns of location of development, including employment and housing.

To protect and maintain most valuable regional assets such as designated habitats, landscapes of natural beauty, and our historic built heritage, and to improve the wider environment by means of adequate investment and management.

To reduce our consumption of fossil fuels.

To achieve a more equitable sharing of the benefits of prosperity across all sectors of society and fairer access to services, focusing on deprived areas in the region.

To use natural resources, both finite and renewable, as efficiently as possible, and re-use finite resources or recycled alternatives wherever possible.

To minimise the production of by-products or wastes, aiming for 'closed systems' where possible.

To avoid using the global environment to underwrite an unsustainable way of life (e.g. dependence on unsustainably produced and/or transported food imports or timber).

To revitalise town centres to promote a return to sustainable urban living.

1) Adoption of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) and 'Green Accounting' by businesses

2)New homes built on previously developed land Number of vacant properties

cycle, bus, passenger rail, rail freight

Traffic congestion

Availability of affordable housing, attractive streets and buildings.

3) Populations of wild birds

Area of semi-natural habitat lost to development

Area of new semi-natural habitat created

Wildlife sites affected by water abstraction

Loss/damage to Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs)

Species at risk

Buildings of Grade I and II* at risk of decay

Changes in landscape features - woodland, hedges, stone walls and ponds

Area of ancient semi-natural woodland

4)Output of greenhouse gas and particularly CO2

Weather-related insurance claims

Regional energy consumption compared with population and GDP

Energy use per household

Proportion of electricity generated from renewable sources

Economic health and prospects of energy industry, including off-shore

Proportion of total travel which is by car

Transport's share of region's CO2 emissions

Freight transport: tonne/miles and empty lorry miles

Air quality improvements measured against related illnesses

Tourism by mode of transport

5) Proportion of housing unfit or lacking appropriate insulation, by area

Availability of public services - transport, shops, banks etc by area

6) Household water use and peak demand

Low flows in rivers

Margin between water supply and projected demand

% of water lost to leakage

Area under agri-environment schemes

Area converted to organic production

Concentration of organic matter in agricultural top-soils

Volumes of minerals produced in the region

Level of minerals and aggregate use replaced by recycled or substitute materials

Number of exhausted mineral sites returned to suitable use

Construction and demolition waste going to landfill

Imported mineral tonnage

Numbers of dwellings created by re-use of existing buildings

Number of buildings designed to sustainability principles

7) Levels of wastes and emissions (nutrients, pesticides, herbicides)

Household waste and recycling

Rivers of good or fair quality

Proportion of water needs met by local water recycling in urban and rural areas

Compliance with Bathing Water Directive

Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants

Air quality - number of days per year any parameter exceeds its National Standard

8) Percentage of food, timber, and raw materials used in the region which is imported from unsustainable

sources

Percentage of food consumed in the region that is produced locally

Number of farmers markets, and local trading schemes

9) Vacant land and properties and derelict land

Proportion of new retail in town centres versus out-of-town

Proportion of population living in town centres

Access to local green space

Quality of surroundings

Noise levels

Rates of fear of crime

% households stating their neighbourhood has 'community spirit'

The plan objectives and policies need to be broadly compatible with the priorities and long term goals of the plan.

The SA Framework should be compatible with this framework. Objectives should be consistent with the overarching RSDF objectives, and include issues covering growth, natural resources, social progress, protection of the environment etc.

East of England Forecasting Model 2012

The East of England Forecasting Model (EEFM) was developed by Oxford Economics to project economic, demographic and housing trends in a consistent fashion. It covers a wide range of variables, and is designed to be flexible so that alternative scenarios can be run.

The EEFM provides a set of ‘baseline’ forecasts for the East of England prepared by a leading independent forecasting house (Oxford Economics).

The East of England is expected to outperform the UK in the medium to long term, according to the Spring 2012 baseline forecasts, with 10.8% employment growth over 2011-21 compared with only 6.9% in the UK.

The baseline forecasts anticipate annual average GVA growth of 2.7% between 2010 and 2020.

Population growth over 2010-20 is estimated at 9.4%

Net in-migration will continue, but at a lower rate than during the past decade. By 2020, the region’s population will be 547,900 higher than in 2010. The baseline forecasts anticipate a strong recovery in employment, with the East of England returning to its 2008 employment peak by 2013, and an additional 327,000 jobs between 2010 and 2020.

The model lists key economic projections for the East of England which should be taken into account when developing housing targets.

The SA needs to include objectives that relate to economic growth and appropriate housing provision to meet the needs of an expanding population.

Transforming Suffolk’s Community Strategy 2008-2028 (2008 revision)

Aim is to improve quality of life in Suffolk for its people and communities.

Document focuses on the future looking forward to the next 20 years and is based around four themes.

A Prosperous and Vibrant Economy:

Learning and skills for the future:

Creating the Greenest County

Safe, Healthy, Inclusive Communities

To become the most innovative and diverse economy in the East of England:

Transport and infrastructure to support sustainable growth

Learning and skills levels in the top quartile in the country

County with greatest reduction in carbon emissions;

Reducing carbon footprint;

Adapting to climate change and geography;

Retain and maintain natural and historic environments

Pursue healthy lifestyles, safety, and sense of community belonging

A number of the key ambitions outlined in the document need to be considered when developing the plan.

The SA Framework should integrate the four core themes and principles.

Transforming Suffolk Community Strategy: Suffolk Strategic Partnership (2008)

Purpose of Suffolk LLA is to improve performance in an area. There is a close similarity between the outcomes in Suffolk Strategic Partnership’s community strategy and those agreed for Ipswich:

Local Strategic Partnerships for Ipswich:

Everyone should have a roof over their head

Everyone should enjoy good health

There should be work for all

The creation of a better environment

People should be kept safe

People should live in friendly and supportive communities.

Ipswich Priorities:

Working at neighbourhood level to tackle deprivation and address health, social and economic inequalities

Community cohesion and integration of new communities

Meeting the growing demand for affordable homes, social rented housing and a partnership approach to addressing deprivation, inequalities and environmental issues relating to housing

Tackling drug related crime

Environmental issues – making sure Ipswich grows in the right way

Supporting business to grow and create more jobs.

The actions, indicators and targets of the LLA should be considered in the development of the plan.

The SA Framework should incorporate indicators and targets that seek to protect community interests.

Inventing our Future: Collective Action for a Sustainable Economy. The Regional Economic Strategy for the East of England 2008 – 2031 (2008)

Vision: By 2031 East of England to be:

Internationally competitive with the global reputation for innovation and business growth

A region that harnesses and develops the talents and creativity of all

At the forefront of the low carbon and resource efficient economy

Also:

Emphasis on developing, attracting and retaining talent to drive the economy

Transforming to a low resource use and low carbon economy and success in adapting to climate change both for the environment and as an opportunity for business growth

Objectives:

Enterprise development

Innovation

Digital economy

Resource efficiency

Skills for productivity

Economic participation

Transport

Spatial Economy

Productivity and prosperity

Annual growth in real workplace based GVA over 2008 – 2031

2.3% per capita

21.% per worker

Employment

Rate by 2031

Working age population: 80%

16-74 population: 70%

Skills

Share of working age population with qualification by 2020 (age 19 to state pension age)

NVQ Level 2 or equivalent and above: 90%

NVQ Level 3 or equivalent and above: 68%

NVQ Level 4 or equivalent and above: 40%

Inequality

Earnings

Level of lower quartile to average income by 2031: 60%

Greenhouse Gasses

End user attributed CO2 Emissions by 2031

Reduction on baseline level: 60%

Water Resources

Household per capita consumption of water

Reduction on 2008 baseline levels by 2030: 20%

Per capita consumption in 2030: 120litres per head per day.

The plan should seek to support business growth and enterprise. In particular it should include objectives to reduce resource use and improve carbon efficiency.

The SA Framework should include objectives that encourage enterprise and business development. It should also include the goals that support the local economy, attract world class businesses, support and develop the local workforce, create stronger and more self-reliant communities with a shift towards a low carbon economy.

Suffolk Growth Strategy March 2013

The growth strategy provides a broad framework and vision on how to encourage business to be successful. It provides opportunities for growth in different sectors of the economy in Suffolk.as well as identifies a potential to create thousands of additional high value and highly skilled jobs in the county.

The strategy aims to address the barriers to growth and sets out objectives associated with inward investment, economic growth, improvement of skills and education and improvement of infrastructure.

Increase the number of apprenticeship starts (at all ages) by at least 33% by 2015/16, from 6,272 currently to 8,342; and to increase the number of 16-18 year olds in apprenticeships by 50% from 1,613 currently to 2,477.

The vision is for Superfast Broadband (both fixed andmobile), offering typical speeds of 100Mbps, to everyone (100% of homes and small business) in Suffolk by 2020. This investment will bring benefits including economic growth of up to 20% over 15 years, and the creation of up to 5,000 new full-time jobs.

The plan should take into consideration the key development sites within the Suffolk Growth Strategy in Ipswich: Ransomes Europark Expansion, Ravenswood, Futura Park, Former Sugar Beet Factory, Adastral Park Expansion. Along with strategic improvements of A12.

The SA Framework should include objectives that promote economic growth and encourage inward investment.

Minerals and Waste Development Framework: Waste Core Strategy (2011)

Vision:

Cease of landfilling of untreated municipal, commercial and industrial wastes by 2026

Recovering value from waste that cannot practically be recycled or composted

Waste management activities to be sensitively located and appropriately operated to high standards to reduce impact/harm on the environment, human health and local amenity and tranquility

Former temporary waste management activities (i.e. landfill sites) will be restored to a quality and a state conducive to appropriate after uses such as agriculture and improving habitat biodiversity

Aims (reflect national and regional water policy together with local considerations):

Manage volume of waste identified in the East of England plan as being apportioned to Suffolk

To promote and encourage sustainable practices in the transportation and management of waste

Contribute to social and economic well being

To protect against adverse impacts on human wellbeing and to ensure waste management facilities do not endanger human health

To protect and enhance the built, natural and historic environment

To assist in reducing the impacts of climate change upon the environment

Relevant targets:

Minimise waste as a priority and encourage communities to take responsibility for the waste they produce through better education through a public consultation

Have efficient transportation of waste throughout Suffolk

Increase access to Household Waste Recycling Centres

Minimise adverse impacts on air quality

Minimise adverse impacts on landscape quality and the built and historic environment

The plan should promote sustainable waste management and promote rates of recycling.

The SA Framework should encourage sustainable waste management.

Joint Municipal Waste Management Strategy for Suffolk 2003 – 2020

Enhance joint working between authorities to improve waste management services

Involve public community groups, waste management industry and governmental bodies in all aspects of waste management

Promotion of education programmes and awareness campaigns to increase knowledge of waste issues and participation in waste management initiatives

Promote and encourage waste reduction and make representation seeking changes to national taxation regulation regimes in order to encourage waste reduction

Promote and encourage waste re-use schemes:

Supporting communities re-use schemes with advice and funding where resource allow

Promote awareness of what people can do to re-use waste

Encourage the re-use of waste collected through recycling centres

Seek to maximise the proportion of waste that is recycled or composted, aiming to achieve at least 60% by 2015

Introduce “three stream” collection system from the curb side of at least 80% of households in Suffolk by 2010

Investigate the possibility of introducing the curb side collection of glass

Promote home composting in all areas through promotional and educational campaigns

Support community composting initiatives

Increase the number of bring sites for the collection of glass throughout the county

Optimise the number and location of household waste and recycling centres; increase the quantity and range of material recycled – aiming to recycling 55% of waste taken to sites by 2015

Introduce non landfill facilities for the treatment of residual waste

Minimise the amount of waste landfill by maximising reduction, re use, recycling and composting

Reduce costs by securing joint procurement and tendering and maximising funding from external sources

Work with Waste and Resource Action Programme, businesses and the community in order to develop markets for recycled waste and outlets.

National Recycling and Recovery targets:

Household waste recycling and composting

Recover 45% by 2015

Recover 50% by 2020

Municipal waste recovery:

Recover 67% by 2015

Recover 75% by 2020

Landfill Allowance Trading Scheme (LATS) Landfill allowances:

LATS

Landfill Allowance

2013

99,160

2020

69,385

Regional relevant targets:

Minimise the impacts of new developments, especially in the Key Centres of Development and Change, on regional waste management requirements

Minimise the environmental impact of waste management arising from movement of waste, and help secure the recovery and disposal of waste without endangering human health

Recognise particular locational needs of some types of waste management facilities in determining planning application and defining green belt boundaries

Targets to minimise waste and provide the basis for implementing the overall aim of recycling, compositing, and recovering value from waste:

Municipal waste – recovery of 70% by 2015

Commercial and industrial waste – recovery of 75% by 2015; and eliminate landfilling of untreated municipal and commercial waste in the region by 2021

Relevant Indicators:

Kilograms of household waste collected per head (BVPI 84) – Waste Disposal Authority (WDA) and seven Waste Collection Authority (WCA) figures combined;

Tonnage and percentage of household waste recycled and composted, including HWRC (BVPIs 82a and 82b);

Percentage of householders that have a separate kerbside collection of dry recyclable and compostable waste;

Number of home composters distributed via partnership scheme;

Recycling rate at HWRCs;

Tonnage of municipal waste landfilled

The plan should recognise the need to implement sustainable waste removal that does not impact on human health or the environment.

Any waste policy in the plan should be developed in accordance with the waste strategy with a clear commitment to the waste hierarchy.

The SA Framework should promote and encourage sustainable waste management particularly within new development.

Suffolk’s Climate Action Plan 2 (2012)

Develop a credible pathway to reduce carbon emission associated with energy use in Suffolk by 60% (on 2004 levels)

Support the development of a green economy

Adapt to future climate change and resource scarcity

Reduction of Suffolk’s annual CO2 emission by 760kt by the end of the decade

Foster resilience to climate change (i.e. winter flooding and summer heat wave events) and promote water saving and energy efficiency

The plan must ensure it is resilient to the future effects of climate change.

The SA Framework should echo the vision and objectives of the plan. It should include objectives that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to climate change.

Suffolk’s Local Transport Plan 2011 - 2031

Priorities:

Creating a prosperous and vibrant economy

Creating the greenest county

Safe, healthy and inclusive communities (Protect vulnerable people and reduce inequalities)

Learning and skills for the future (Transform learning and skills)

Transport aims to meet priorities:

1)

Improve connectivity and accessibility

Maintain core transport networks. Balance capacity and demand for travel, through increasing the use of sustainable transport and reducing need for travel

Improve access to jobs and commercial markets for residents and businesses based in the county

2)

Reduced emissions from transport, including road maintenance

Maintaining resilience of transport networks (e.g. coping with flooding, pot holes, winter damage)

Reduced air pollutant emissions

3)

Facilitating an increase in walking and cycling

Improving the physical accessibility of the transport system, improving information about travel options, improving access to services for those without access to cars

Supporting wider regeneration

Reducing the number of casualties on the transport network

Reducing impact of poor air quality on local communities

4)

Improving accessibility to schools, colleges, universities and other places of learning

Access to broadband for online learning

The plan should be aligned with Suffolk’s Transport Plan. It should also seek to reduce the dependence on the private car through maximising opportunities for people to use sustainable modes of transport.

The SA Framework should include objectives that encourage and promote the use of sustainable transport along with providing new infrastructure where required.

New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership ‘Towards a Growth Plan’ 2013

We have a simple Vision for New Anglia in 2025- more jobs, businesses and prosperity.

In 2025, Greater Norwich and Greater Ipswich will be two of the most competitive City regions in Europe for domestic and foreign investment. Suffolk and Norfolk will have as international reputation for our home produced food, the quality of our festivals and cultural events and the beauty and diversity of our coasts and countryside.

School attainment throughout New Anglia will match the best in Europe making it easy to attract skilled and talented professionals to drive our global companies.

Superfast broadband and 6g mobile phone services will be available everywhere in New Anglia.

The UK economy will grow by 0.6% during the rest of 2013 and by 1.8% and 2.3% in the next two years.

The plan should seek to promote sustainable economic growth within Ipswich that meets the needs of its residents with regards to jobs and new homes.

The SA Framework should include objectives that support sustainable economic growth and the provision of jobs.

Expanding Suffolk’s Horizons: Economic Strategy – Taking Suffolk to 2013

Aims to promote and develop what makes Suffolk a special and distinctive place in which to live and work but at the same time addressing one central target, raising Gross Value Added (GVA) per head.

Objectives:

Raising wage and skill levels more closely in line with regional average

Promoting innovation and entrepreneurship

Stimulating enterprise and ambition, particularly among young people

Developing Suffolk’s economy around centres of excellence of key growth areas

Ensuring growth is sustainable economically and environmentally

Increase GVA per head by 95% of UK Average

Increase net business formation rate by 1% per annum

Increase gross weekly pay for full time employees to 94% of regional median

Increase number of new jobs created/safeguard through inward investment by 10%

Increase the value of tourism by 2% per annum

Increase the levels of education and qualifications

Promote Ipswich in the Environmental Agency’s flood defence register with a further commitment to protect areas of significant commercial/agricultural value

The plan should seek to promote sustainable economic growth within Ipswich that meets the needs of its residents with regards to jobs and new homes.

The SA Framework should include objectives that support sustainable economic growth and the provision of jobs.

East of England Learning and Skills Council (LSC) Equality and Diversity Action Plan 2008

It lays out actions for the LSC East of England to meet its statutory duties as laid out in the LSC Single Equality Scheme

The action plan is broken into four areas:

Learning and skills

Performance of the system

Impact measures and impact assessment

Governance

Raise the quality and improve the choice of learning opportunities

Raise the skills of the region, giving employers and individuals the skills they need to improve productivity

Raise their contribution to economic development

Raise the performance of a world class system that is responsive, provides choice and is valued and recognised for its excellence

To provide measures that will enable overall progress to be judged

Make promoting equality and diversity an integral part of how the East of England LSC is led and governed

The plan should seek to reduce discrimination and promote equality and diversity within Ipswich.

The SA Framework should include objectives that reduce discrimination and promote equality within Ipswich.

Suffolk Haven Gateway Employment Land Review 2009

The Employment Land Review and Strategic Sites Study for Suffolk Haven Gateway looks into providing the right mix of employment land to meet the future job growth target of 30,000 in the Suffolk Haven Gateway sub-region. There are evident opportunities through investment in infrastructure and allocation of employment land in the right locations (the A14 and the Ipswich Fringe) to provide a quality and choice that will support efforts to retain existing businesses and encourage new ones and thereby work to achieve the employment target.

No specific indicators or targets of relevance in this plan or programme.

The plan should reference this document when selecting new employment sites.

The SA Framework should include objectives that support economic growth.

East of England Plan for Sport (2004)

The aim is to change the culture of sport and physical activity in England in order to increase participation across all social groups leading to improvements in health and in other social and economic benefits; and providing the basis for progression into higher levels of performance.

Key targets:

Increasing participation in sport and active recreation

Improving levels of performance

Widening access

Improving health and well being

Creating stronger and safer communities

Improving education

Benefiting the economy

The plan policies should seek to increase participation in sport. This could include opportunities to improve access to existing facilities, to prevent the loss of existing facilities and to support the provision of new facilities.

The SA Framework should consider objectives to increase participation in sport through improved access and additional facilities.

Suitable objectives should also be developed in relation to protecting human health.

Biodiversity Action Plan for Suffolk (Various dates)

The plan comprises a series of action plans for habitats and species in Suffolk.

For each of the habitats and species information is provided about current national, regional and local status.

For each habitat type/species a series of objectives, actions and timescales for implementation are identified.

The plan should incorporate policies that support and promote the enhancement of biodiversity.

The SA Framework should seek to maximise benefits to biodiversity resources.

Water for Life and Livelihoods: River Basin Management Plan: Anglian River Basin District (2009)

This plan has been prepared under the Water Framework Directive, which requires all countries throughout the European Union to manage the water environment to consistent standards. Each country has to:

Prevent deterioration in the status of aquatic ecosystems, protect them and improve the ecological condition of waters;

Aim to achieve at least good status for all water bodies by 2015. Where this is not possible and subject to the criteria set out in the Directive, aim to achieve good status by 2021 or 2027;

Meet the requirements of Water Framework Directive Protected Areas;

Promote sustainable use of water as a natural resource;

Conserve habitats and species that depend directly on water;

Progressively reduce or phase out the release of individual pollutants or groups of pollutants that present a significant threat to the aquatic environment;

Progressively reduce the pollution of groundwater and prevent or limit the entry of pollutants;

Contribute to mitigating the effects of floods and droughts.

By 2015, 16 per cent of surface waters (rivers, lakes, estuaries and coastal waters) in this river basin district are going to improve for at least one biological, chemical or physical element, measured as part of an assessment of good status according to the Water Framework Directive. This includes an improvement of 1,700 km of the river network in relation to fish, phosphate, specific pollutants and other elements.

By 2015 19 per cent of surface waters will be at good ecological status/potential and 45 per cent of groundwater bodies will be at good status. In combination 20 per cent of all water bodies will be at good status by 2015. The Environment Agency wants to go further and achieve an additional two per cent improvement to surface waters across England and Wales by 2015.

The biological parts of how the water environment is assessed – the plant and animal communities – are key indicators. At least 30 per cent of assessed surface waters will be at good or better biological status by 2015.

The plan should seek to protect and enhance the water environment.

The SA Framework should include objectives that seek to protect and enhance water quality and water resources.

In Step with Suffolk: Right of Way Improvement Plan (2006-16)

Objectives:

Provide a better signed, maintained and accessible network

Provide and a protect a more continuous network that provides for the requirements of all users

Develop a safer network

Increase community involvement in improving and managing the network

Provide an up to date publically available digitised definitive map for the whole of Suffolk

Improve promotion, understanding and use of network

No relevant indicators

The plan should be consistent with the objectives of the Rights of Way Improvement Plan.

Baseline information, issues and opportunities identified within the plan should be considered when developing the SA Framework.

Leading the Way – Green Economy Pathfinder Manifesto 2012-15, New Anglia LEP

Looking at the potential for sustainable growth in the development of low-carbon and environmental goods and services; the potential for employment and skills development; innovative financing for businesses and entrepreneurs; business resource efficiency; energy; how best to value the areas natural resources; and community benefits to be enjoyed from a thriving green economy in the Anglia region.

Key targets:

To grow sustainably and for the long term

To use natural resources efficiently

To be more resilient

To build on current experience and exploit comparative advantages – to deliver innovative low-carbon solutions at scale.

The plan should include methods to promote sustainable growth, develop a low carbon economy and increase efficiency.

The SA Framework should include objectives that promote sustainable growth, seek to develop a low carbon economy and increase efficiency.

Wild Anglia Manifesto ,September 2013, Part 1 Aims and Objectives

Wild Anglia’s ambition to get sustainable development right in Norfolk and Suffolk. It focusses on the future of businesses, a better quality of life for a healthier population and a better place for our wildlife to thrive.

Key objectives:

Economic growth: nature will make a full contribution to the success of the economy.

Exemplary ‘green infrastructure’: insisting on the best projects for people, nature and economy.

Strengthening nature: creating, improving and

investing in the natural environment

Healthy, happy society: making the most of nature’s capacity to improve lives.

No specific targets and indicators

The plan should promote green infrastructure.

The SA Framework should include objectives to promote and developing green infrastructure in Ipswich.

Suffolk’s Nature Strategy (Wild Anglia, 2014)

A 2020 vision for Suffolk’s natural environment working together as individuals, communities, businesses and decision-makers, we will ensure Suffolk’s natural environment is conserved and enhanced for future generations and continues to be seen as one of the county’s key strengths. Its intrinsic value, as well as its importance to our economic growth, is increasingly understood, whilst the people of Suffolk and our visitors are able to gain better access to enhanced enjoyment and a deeper understanding of its unique qualities. We will continue to add to our knowledge of Suffolk’s wildlife and landscapes and to collect high-quality information.

Suffolk’s Nature Strategy describes the challenges and opportunities our natural environment faces. Its purpose is to articulate what we believe are the key natural environment priorities for the county and to convey to decision-makers how the wildlife and landscapes of Suffolk are important building blocks for our own economic growth and health and wellbeing. The recommendations and actions we propose within this document are both forward-looking and challenging. Their delivery will enhance the environment of Suffolk itself, as well as our ability to derive both economic and social benefits from it. Once you have read this document we hope that your understanding of the importance of the natural environment goes far beyond its beauty. It is aimed particularly at the leaders of public, private and voluntary sector organisations, but we hope it will also be of interest to anyone who cares about Suffolk’s natural environment and the role it plays in our prosperity and wellbeing. The messages are equally relevant to businesses, health professionals and community representatives. Whilst conservation of Suffolk’s environment is of particular interest to us, everyone has a responsibility to look after it, and of course, many already do.

The strategy is set out in three broad sections: natural environment, economic growth and health and wellbeing each containing a number of sub-sections for issues of particular importance to the delivery of our vision. Suffolk’s Nature Strategy is written in the context of Wild Anglia’s

manifesto2 (the Local Nature Partnership (LNP) across Norfolk & Suffolk).All the organisations involved in drafting this strategy are closely involved with the LNP and this strategy will contribute to Wild Anglia’s vision across Norfolk & Suffolk.

The plan should seek to protect and enhance the natural environment.

The SA Framework should include objectives that seek to protect and enhance nature and its resources.

Suffolk Cycling Strategy (Suffolk County Council)

With a growing population which will place increasing pressure on our road network, we have to consider how best to encourage people to take to their bikes. Clearly, we want to foster an environment where bike and car coexist, with an infrastructure that supports both and which encourages cycling, particularly for those two-thirds of car journeys which are fewer than five kilometres. We also know that many drivers would cycle more if the quality and provision was improved. So, the challenge is to promote the benefits of cycling as widely as possible, whilst at the same time we take on the more practical task of improving our cycling infrastructure. From local projects in our towns and villages, to better signage and a host of activities in between, we can succeed in encouraging more people in Suffolk to cycle than ever before if we work together. There are numerous thriving cycling groups and communities in Suffolk, from young people cycling to school to people commuting to work. We have a great foundation upon which to build.

  • To encourage cycling across all sectors of the community, supporting

  • Suffolk’s ‘Most Active County’ ambitions

  • To promote a transfer to cycling (and walking) for short distance trips,

  • supporting Suffolk’s ‘Creating the Greenest County’ ambitions To promote the benefits of cycling for health and for the subsequent

  • savings in the health budget

  • To foster enthusiasm for cycling in young people

  • To plan and design for the future with cycling in mind

  • To create a safe and cycle friendly environment

The plan should seek to help and support cycle networks.

The SA Framework should include objectives that seek to help and support cycle networks.

Anglian Water’s Water Resources Management Plan 2015

This is our 2015 Water Resource Management Plan (WRMP). It shows how we are going to maintain the balance between supply and demand over the next 25 years, as well as deal with the longer term challenge of population increase, climate change and growing environmental needs. We supply water to approximately 2 million households in East Anglia, the adjacent areas of the South East, Midlands, Yorkshire, Humberside and to households in Hartlepool. Rainfall in most of our supply area is significantly less than the national average. We are classed as an area of severe water stress and have many wetland and conservation sites of national and international importance. Safeguarding these vital assets and maintaining supplies to customers are the two objectives of this plan. Over the next 25 years, our supply-demand balance is at risk from growth, climate change and the reductions in deployable output that we will make to restore abstraction to sustainable levels. In the worst case combination, the impact could approach 567Ml/d, equivalent to approximately 50% of the water we put into supply in 2012/13. We also have to manage risks from drought, deteriorating raw water quality and the impact of cold, dry weather on our distribution system and customer supply pipes.

The key elements of our final plan are:

  • Supporting water efficiency, so that customers only use the water they need

  • Reducing the number of leaks from the network of pipes that transports water

  • Transferring water from where there is a surplus to areas of shortage

  • In the long-term, developing additional supplies.

The plan should seek to help and provide sustainability measures for water resources.

The SA Framework should include objectives that seek to help and support sustainable use of water resources.

One Ipswich Everybody Matters Strategy 2008-2010

We want Ipswich to be a vibrant, prosperous and thriving place. We will address deprivation and inequality in neighbourhoods and develop an economically dynamic and enterprising society so everyone in Ipswich can:

• be prosperous and have a place to live

• be healthy and stay well

• achieve their potential and enjoy life

• keep safe

• have a greater say and better choices

• live in friendly and supportive communities

We will:

Deliver a long-term investment in community development to respond to important local issues across the town. The One- Ipswich partnership has chosen a project focused approach to deliver our outcomes, and we will seek to exploit and replicate the learning of existing good practice. This will help all the LSP partners by:

1. Assisting in generating community intelligence.

2. Addressing health concerns.

3. Improving the environment.

4. Engaging with young people.

5. Improving access to drug and alcohol treatment, and signposting.

6. Generating community involvement

7. Integrating the voluntary sector

15,400 additional homes to be provided for (2001 - 2021).

An additional 4,710 additional homes to be provided for just outside Ipswich.

18,000 new jobs to be provided for (2001 - 2021).

Affordable housing to constitute at least 30% of housing supply with an aspiration of 40% of supply if Ipswich housing stress warrants higher provision.

Car traffic levels to stabilise at 1999 levels.

All major developments to provide at least 10% of their energy requirements via renewable power generation.

The plan should seek to reduce discrimination and promote equality and diversity within Ipswich.

The SA Framework should include objectives that reduce discrimination and promote equality within Ipswich along with promoting community involvement.

Ipswich Borough Council Level 2 Strategic Flood Risk Assessment (2011)

This Level 2 SFRA supersedes the draft level 1 SFRA dated November 2007 and accounts for the presence of recently improved flood defences within Ipswich, as well as for the planned flood defence barrier expected to be operational in 2014.

The SFRA also considers the potential effects of development on local flooding and minor watercourses and identifies mitigation measures including sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDS) and suggests a framework for safe development in flood zones 2 & 3.

No specific targets identified.

The plan should seek to avoid development within Flood Zone 3.

The SA Framework should include objectives that address flood risk within Ipswich.

The Ipswich Drainage and flood defence policy (2002 with minor updates in 2009)

Sets out the Council’s policy relating to flood protection and drainage

Objectives:

Control of development in areas at risk of flooding

The Inspection and maintenance of ordinary watercourses

Establishing flood warnings and emergency evacuation

Creating sustainable urban drainage systems (SuDS)

Includes: gardens, roads, pipework and manholes, private roofs, driveways and car parks; construction infiltration systems

No specific targets and indicators

Drainage and flood defence must me a key consideration during the preparation of the plan.

The plan should seek to avoid development within Flood Zone 3.

The SA Framework should include policies that seek to preserve water resources, protect water quality and reduce flood risk i.e. through ensuring new development provides SuDs measures.

Integrated Landscape Character Objectives (2010)

The aim was to develop a regional urban landscape typology for the East of England. It articulates the broad variety of towns and cities in the region and the characteristics of the urban landscape of each settlement.

Provides an overview of landscape character and settlements for informing future assessment such as green infrastructure strategies for extension to existing settlements and creation of new settlements.

Development must maintain a “sense of place” relevant to the area.

Landscape character should be considered when drafting the plan and siting new development.

The SA Framework should include an objective on protecting and enhancing landscape character and quality.

Countryside Character Volume 6: East of England (1998)

This document presents the results of Natural England’s survey of the countryside character and landscape of the East of England.

Many different elements combine to create the character of the countryside. Important to recognise influences on this character that combine to a sense of place, and set a tract of countryside apart from adjacent areas.

The document contains no targets or indicators.

The East of England’s landscape character should be considered when drafting the plan and siting new development.

The SA Framework should include an objective on protecting and enhancing landscape character and quality.

Ipswich Economic Development Strategy 2012 – 2026

The economic development strategy will focus on job creation and retention, as well as promoting and attracting investment to Ipswich, reflecting core aims in the Council’s Corporate Plan – ‘Building A Better Ipswich1’.

Vision statement

“Ipswich will be an inspiring and exciting town perceived as both an attractive location for investment in business and a centre of excellence for education. Creative people in partnership with dynamic businesses will drive a diverse and innovative urban economy. A sustainable and low carbon Ipswich will enable individuals to flourish, and inhabitants will be notable for their enterprise, ambition, creativity and pride in their town”

There are no specific targets and indicators.

The plan should seek to facilitate regeneration and economic growth across Ipswich.

The SA Framework should include objectives that support sustainable economic growth.

Ipswich Borough Council Corporate Plan (2012)

The new corporate plan for Ipswich consists of 6 themes and it reveals that the council’s priority is to attract new investment and jobs to Ipswich by helping to boost private sector jobs and by supporting the construction industry by building much-needed new affordable housing.

There are two underlying principles:

Underlying principle 1: A Fairer Ipswich:

Everything we do will be based on the principles of fairness and participation. We will work to eliminate discrimination, promote equality of opportunity, and foster good relations amongst all the people of Ipswich.

Underlying Principle 2: Value for Money:

We will constantly seek to improve the efficiency of the Council, with savings used to protect and improve services and to keep down council tax.

Themes:

1. A stronger Ipswich economy

2. A safer and healthier Ipswich

3. Keeping Ipswich moving

4. Quality housing for all

5. A greener Ipswich

6. A more enjoyable Ipswich

1. A stronger Ipswich Economy:

Develop an Economic Development Strategy with a focus on job retention and creation and to promote and attract investment into Ipswich;

Increase both the number and profile of apprenticeships within the business community of Ipswich;

Assist small and medium enterprises to deliver training and business support

Support skills development and promote educational, business and community engagement.

4. Quality housing for all

Continue investment to maintain the Decent Homes Standard and achieve the Ipswich Standard by 2014;

Increase the delivery of affordable housing by aiming for 35% of all new homes delivered to be affordable, and by keeping our affordable housing policies under review;

Work in partnership with Homes and Communities Agency to deliver affordable housing and employment;

Work to minimise the impact to local residents of the reduction in the County Council’s Supporting People funding to Ipswich Borough Council (e.g. to sheltered housing tenants and homeless people)

The Corporate Plan identifies priorities within Ipswich which should be taken into account when developing the pan.

The SA Framework should include objectives that support the economy and address housing issues.

Ipswich Cultural Strategy 2011-2014

This three year strategy sets out how Ipswich Borough Council will focus on six key objectives to further improve cultural assets while facilitating the development of others.

The strategy identifies major improvements, including a refurbishment of Crown Pools. It also highlights big ambitions for the future including a new Centre of Excellence for the arts focussed on the Ipswich Museum and Art School. The success of these will be dependent on winning support from local residents and stakeholders as well as achieving external funding.

The new strategy has six themes with key actions to provide a focus for investment and decision-making over the next 3 years:

1. Responding to the national pressure on public spend

2. Developing the Cultural Economy

3. Improving and sustaining what we have

4. Increasing participation in cultural activity

5. 2012 Olympic Legacy

6. Ambitions for the future

Focus activity on key local assets and aim to reduce duplication and improve efficiency through better co-ordination and management of linked services. We will make better use of partnerships and voluntary provision, maximise income and seek external funding where available.

Promote the town’s cultural facilities and develop its cultural economy to attract more visitors (especially those who stay more than one day) and boost the local economy.

Seek to improve our facilities where we can and ensure they are well maintained and run by qualified customer focussed staff.

Encourage communities to become involved in the management and maintenance of their local facilities.

The Council will work with partners, including the County Council, Nations and Regions East, private providers and the third sector to provide opportunities and a lasting legacy linked to 2012.

Secure £10m investment in a new Centre of Excellence for Arts & Culture, combining the existing Ipswich Museum with adjacent buildings: Ipswich Art School; Wolsey Studio and; High Street Exhibition Gallery, to create a truly world class facility and tourist attraction, providing a source of pride and inspiration for the community.;

Establish a new sports village focussed on Gainsborough Sports Centre with more sporting facilities including improved football/all weather pitches, cycling facilities etc.;

The strategy identifies the benefit of improving and developing cultural assets – the plan should seek to protect and enhance heritage assets across the borough. .

The SA Framework should include objectives conserve and enhance heritage assets within Ipswich.

Ipswich Environment Strategy 2010

This overarching Strategy explains how we deliver environmental performance through different areas of the Council’s activities and its policies and strategies. This Strategy is not subordinate to other strategies. This Strategy will enable Ipswich Borough Council to improve its environmental performance by identifying and addressing environmental issues that are not covered by other policies and strategies; and by referencing and monitoring environmental actions that are addressed elsewhere.

This document is driven by the Council’s corporate strategy and its community strategy we set our strategic objectives.

‘Transforming Ipswich’ identifies 6 key themes to develop performance:

Clean & Green Ipswich

Expanding Ipswich

Safe Ipswich

Strengthening Communities in Ipswich

Travel Ipswich

Vibrant Ipswich

The primary theme for this strategy is Clean and Green Ipswich:

‘We will work with the community to make Ipswich a model urban clean and green place’

Seek to continually improve the cleanliness of Ipswich and seek to enhance the town through effective urban design

Reduce waste by supporting initiatives that reduce, re-use and recycle

Ensure that residents and businesses value the environment and take action to reduce environmental impact through education, campaigning and enforcement

Ensure adequate open spaces and amenity areas are available

Protect and enhance biodiversity, by managing, developing and interpreting our valuable natural habitats and sensitive wildlife sites

Monitor air, land, water and noise pollution within the Borough and take measures to minimise local pollution consistent with sustainable development principles

Reduce carbon emissions by encouraging and supporting initiatives that promote renewable energy and energy efficiency

The plan should seek to maximise environmental benefits across the borough as part of new development. .

The SA Framework should include objectives that maximise benefits to the environment.

The Ipswich Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2011 – 2016

The vision is to improve the health and wellbeing of the people of Ipswich and support them in adopting a healthy lifestyle

Priorities:

To develop and implement an action plan to meet the vision

Reduce health inequalities

Promote healthy lifestyles and healthy communities

Collate local information on health and wellbeing issues and to address them

No indicators.

The plan should promote healthy lifestyles, e.g. providing new recreational facilities, areas of open space, footpaths, cycle routes etc.

The SA Framework should include objectives promoting healthy lifestyles and improved health.

Ipswich Housing Strategy 2010/11-15/16

Vision:

Everyone in Ipswich should have the opportunity to rent or buy a decent home at the price they can afford, in a sustainable community where they want to live and work

Priorities:

Improve housing supply and improving neighbourhoods through a mix of high quality, environmentally sustainable homes for sale or rent

Improving housing quality and environmental sustainability

Supporting and including vulnerable adults, hard to reach groups and all communities

Doing the basics better for less

Priority 1

Improving strategic links

Affordable housing targets:

To be provided on sites of 0.5hectares or more, or 15 units or more

The amount to be provided is 35% and a minimum of 65% of this must be provided as social rented housing

Continued supply of new affordable homes

Balanced, sustainable communities

Balance of large and small affordable homes

Target for at least 65% of new affordable homes to rent

Meeting gypsy and traveller pitch needs

New housing that meets the needs of all communities

Right mix of new market, affordable and specialist housing for older people

New homes for people with care and support needs, and adapted homes

New homes for students in balanced communities

Environmental sustainability

Improved housing supply through the best use of existing stock

Priority 3:

Effective housing and neighbourhood management through partnership working

Priority 4:

All housing services to represent good value for money

Tenants and residents are involved in decision making

The plan should ensure that new housing meets an identified need across Ipswich, taking into consideration, quality, housing type, density, affordability, location etc.

The SA Framework should include objectives, indicators and targets that support new homes e.g. providing an appropriate balance of housing types.

Ipswich Town Centre Master Plan 2012

The Town Centre Master Plan provides a view of what Ipswich Borough Council and stakeholders agree is the way forward to achieve an enhanced town centre in Ipswich. The 15-year plan has an end date of 2027. It complements the adopted Core Strategy and Policies Development Plan Document and other relevant policy documents.

The aim is to enhance, remodel and develop the town centre, delivering a programme of regeneration and renewal which builds on the aspirations to be a regional centre for shopping and culture.

The document contains no targets or indicators.

The plan should be consistent with the approach identified within this master plan.

The SA Framework should include objectives that seek to facilitate regeneration not only within Ipswich town centre but borough wide.

Ipswich Open Space and Biodiversity Policy/Strategy 2013-2023

This policy establishes guiding principles for the provision and management of green space within Ipswich Borough, and recommends a strategy for its protection and enhancement so that it can be enjoyed by future generations.

Vision statement:

‘To safeguard, protect and enhance biodiversity and the environment and improve everyone’s quality of life by working in partnership with others to ensure that our parks and open spaces are well designed, well managed, safe and freely accessible, encouraging use and benefiting the whole community’

Ensure the provision and management of public open space meets customer needs, now and over the next 10 years.

Ensure the natural environment, trees and wildlife is afforded appropriate protection.

Ensure the Council operates within the law and where possible adheres to best practice.

To raise awareness of the benefits and value of good quality, accessible, biodiversity rich public open space.

Identify priorities for future investment and thus ensure best use of available resources.

Provide appropriate guidance through the planning process to ensure new public open space is appropriately located, of a high quality and meets local needs.

Plan for and mitigate the effects of climate change.

Improve the quality of the public realm, natural environment and local heritage.

Build social cohesion and encourage healthy lifestyles through a well planned and managed ‘green space’ infrastructure.

Create a delivery plan for green infrastructure provision,

Ensure any cross boundary provision is properly coordinated and managed and

Ensure heritage parks and heritage features within our parks are afforded appropriate protection.

The strategy identifies principles for the provision and management of green space which should be taken into consideration in the plan.

The SA Framework should include objectives that seek to protect and enhance local biodiversity.

Tree Management Policy 2010

The Tree Management Policy will allow the council:

To continually develop an integrated approach to tree management that embraces all aspects of the council’s tree related activities in a coherent and co-ordinated tree programme.

To promote awareness of the value of trees in our environment.

To interpret the policy framework.

To give direction and guidance to local initiatives both public and private.

No relevant indicators.

The plan should promote effective tree management within Ipswich.

The SA Framework should consider the importance of tree management.

Allotment Strategy 2014-2020 (2005)

A successful strategy will bring allotments into public focus advertising the benefits for all, resulting in increased lettings and improved standards.

This will be done by developing a service in which people can expect good security and facility provision. Increased promotion as an activity for all should encourage people of all backgrounds to develop their skills as new gardeners.

The aims of the allotment strategy are:

to raise the awareness of others to the benefits of allotments for all leading to an increase in the number of plot holders

to set a standard for the provision of allotments in Ipswich

to improve the standard of service provision

to investigate ways to improve the financial position of the service

consider the demand for allotments both now and in the future

review and propose changes if required to the provision and distribution of allotment land in Ipswich.

No relevant indicators.

The plan should identify new allotment space within Ipswich if there is a proven need.

The SA Framework should seek to provide new areas of open space for communities to come together and enjoy.

Ipswich Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment Draft Update Report (2013)

The Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) is a key component of the evidence base underpinning the Council’s Local Plan, by identifying a list of sites which may be suitable and available for housing development.

The study identifies sites with potential for housing development but the study does not make any decisions about site allocations.

No specific targets of relevance in this plan or programme.

The SHLAA identifies potentially suitable housing sites in the Borough – the plan should ensure allocations brought forward within this document are considered in the plan.

The SA Framework should include objectives that relate to the choice, quality and diversity of housing and also ensuring that such housing is available to all communities and sectors of society.

Ipswich Housing Market Area Strategic Housing Market Assessment 2012

This document updates the 2008 Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA) for the Ipswich Housing Market Area, which comprises: the districts of Babergh, Mid Suffolk and Suffolk Coastal, and the Borough of Ipswich. This update is a hybrid between a straight- forward review of the data and an entirely new assessment.

Currently, there is a backlog of over 4,000 households in need of a suitable and affordable home in the Ipswich HMA.

The supply of new affordable homes and the reuse of existing stock are not sufficient.

In order to address this shortfall, 70% of all new homes in the Ipswich HMA currently being planned would need to be affordable.

The needs are greatest in Ipswich with an annual need for at least 584 more homes to be affordable. Need within Suffolk Coastal is the next greatest at 355, in Mid Suffolk 229 are required and 134 more affordable homes are needed each year in Babergh.

The plan should include seek to maximise affordable housing to meet current and future needs of residents.

The SA Framework needs to include objectives that relate to the choice, quality, diversity and affordability of housing.

Ipswich Transport Model Assessment, Aecom, 2010

The Assessment was carried out to gain an understanding of the most appropriate transport solutions to cater for the overall scale of growth in Ipswich.

The target of this assessment was to evaluate the impact on Ipswich’s transport network of future growth under a number of different scenarios (5):

Do minimum

Do minimum with development

2021 with development and sustainable travel investment

2021 with development, sustainable travel investment and with Northern bypass

2021 with development, sustainable travel investment and wet deck crossing

The plan should seek to encourage people to leave their cars at home and promote sustainable modes of transport.

The SA Framework needs to include objectives that seek to improve opportunities to use sustainable modes of transport.

Mid Suffolk District Council Core Strategy Focused Review adopted December 2012

This document was produced as a focused review of the adopted Core Strategy (2008) to update certain sections with recent information.

To update certain sections of the 2008 Core Strategy.

The plan should seek to complement the vision, objectives and strategy within the Core Strategy – particularly as a residual number of homes required by residents in Ipswich would be constructed in neighbouring authorities.

The SA Framework should be mindful of the vision, objectives and strategy.

Babergh Core Strategy and Policies 2011-2031 (2014)

The Core Strategy & Policies provides a high-level strategic plan for Babergh for 20 years from 2011-2031. The policies are intended to be broad and general, overarching policies outlining the strategy for growth and steering growth to sustainable locations.

No specific indicators or targets of relevance in this plan or programme.

The plan should seek to complement the vision, objectives and strategy within the Core Strategy – particularly as a residual number of homes required by residents in Ipswich would be constructed in neighbouring authorities.

The SA Framework should be mindful of the vision, objectives and strategy.

Community Cohesion Policy 2009

This policy provides Ipswich Borough Council’s position in respect of achieving community cohesion in Ipswich. It identifies the development of community cohesion as a result of engagement and empowerment in Ipswich.

Objectives:

Identify issues which undermine relations within and between community members.

Select and initiate responses that address these issues in a proportionate and prioritised way.

Ensure equality of opportunity.

Integrate new arrivals into the community and build a sense of belonging.

Promote understanding and acceptance between different community members.

No specific indicators or targets of relevance in this plan or programme.

The plan should include measures to promote community.

The SA Framework should include objectives that relate to promoting community cohesion.

Equality and Diversity policy 2010

The policy sets out the Council’s commitment to taking effective action to eliminate discrimination and to promote equality of opportunity and diversity in all that it does as an employer, a service provider and as a community leader.

No specific indicators or targets of relevance in this plan or programme.

The plan should seek to reduce discrimination and promote equality and diversity within Ipswich.

The SA Framework should include objectives that reduce discrimination and promote equality within Ipswich.

A Fairer Ipswich Equality Scheme 2012-15

The purpose of this scheme is to set out a corporate equality and diversity strategy for the next 3 years and how Ipswich council intend to meet their Equality Duty under the Equality Act 2010.

Staff are to undertake equality and diversity training to ensure they achieve the necessary competencies appropriate to their job roles in delivering the Council's Equality Duty.

Set out clearly to our staff and customers why we are collecting information, how it will be used and more importantly to assure them of confidentiality and data security. Staff will receive training on obtaining information from customers in an appropriate and sensitive manner.

Undertake equality analysis to help services identify any negative adverse impacts and to consider appropriate measures to mitigate the risks of disadvantage and discrimination.

The plan should promote equality and reduce discrimination in the region.

The SA Framework should include objectives that relate to equality and discrimination.

Homelessness Strategy 2008-13

The Homelessness Strategy re-affirms the Council’s commitment to responding to the challenges set by central government by continuously improving services and working with partner agencies and stakeholders in order to prevent and alleviate homelessness and to help people maintain accommodation.

The key targets of this strategy are:

Encourage homeless prevention

Support vulnerable people

Tackle the wider causes of homelessness

Help people move away from rough sleeping

Provide more settled homes

The plan should seek to reduce homelessness in Ipswich.

The SA Framework should include objectives that seek to reduce rough sleeping and homelessness in the area.

Ipswich Local Transport Plan (part of the Suffolk LTP, SCC 2011-2031)

This plan outlines how transport will play its part in supporting and facilitating future sustainable economic growth by:

• Maintaining (and in the future improving) our transport networks

• Tackling congestion

• Improving access to jobs and markets

• Encouraging a shift to more sustainable travel patterns.

The targets for this plan are:

Maintain and, over time, improve Suffolk’s transport networks

Improve access to jobs and markets

Reduce congestion

The plan should promote initiatives that reduce congestion and improve transport infrastructure.

The SA Framework should include objectives that seek to reduce congestion, provide new infrastructure (where required) and promote the use of sustainable modes of transport.

Ipswich Employment Land Availability Report 2012

Extensive surveys are carried out annually for main employment areas, as identified through saved policies of the 1997 adopted Local Plan and the Proposals Map. Sites with current planning permissions for employment use are also monitored annually and updated in the report.

No specific indicators or targets of relevance in this plan or programme.

The plan should base the selection of new employment sites on this report.

The SA Framework should include objectives that support economic growth.

Ipswich Development and Flood Risk SPD 2014

Guidance to facilitate the planning permission process is provided in SPD particularly with regards to flood risk vulnerability and flood zone ‘compatibility’. Flood resilient measures are also included as part of the guidance.

No specific indicators or targets of relevance in this plan or programme.

The plan should seek to avoid development in Flood Zone 3.

The SA should include an objective directly related to managing flood risk.

Haven Gateway Green Infrastructure Study 2008

The strategy appraises and identifies standards for delivering enhancements to the existing ANG network. The criteria for defining Accessible Natural Greenspace (ANG) were developed. The existing ANG provision was appraised to identify deficiencies in provision based on four accessible natural greenspace standards (as developed by English Nature [now Natural England] in 2003, adapted by the Town and Country Planning Association and agreed by the Steering Group).

The following set of standards (based on those promoted by the Town and Country Planning Association) has been used.

People should have access to:

• 2ha+ of ANG within 300m of home – this has been termed the Neighbourhood Level

• 20ha+ of ANG within 1.2km of home – the District Level

• 60ha+ of ANG within 3.2km of home – the Sub-regional Level

• 500ha+ of ANG within 10km of home – the Regional Level

The plan should ensure that sufficient land is allocated for greenspace / open space and where necessary improve access.

The SA should take into consideration the proximity of new development to open space and green infrastructure and seek improve access further.

Open Space and Biodiversity Policy / Strategy 2013 - 2023

The Open Space and Biodiversity Policy examines the provision of open space in terms of its quantity, quality, accessibility and management, identifying opportunities to increase supply, improve standards and satisfy demand. The Open Space and Biodiversity Policy underlines the importance of this land asset in meeting social and environmental needs, providing a very cost effective way of delivering a variety of benefits across all sections of the community and serving as a ‘quality of life’ indicator.

In terms of the provision of shading and greening, Ipswich Borough currently has approximately 12% tree canopy cover. Currently Ipswich does not have a time related tree canopy cover goals. A realistic standard to aim for in Ipswich is 22% by 2050.

The plan should ensure that sufficient land is allocated for greenspace / open space and where necessary improve access.

The SA should take into consideration the potential loss of open space and canopy cover due to new development and provide suggestions to mitigate this.

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