ipswich.gov.uk

Sustainability Appraisal Scoping Report

Ended on the 30th October 2017
If you are having trouble using the system, please try our help guide.

Appendix I Index of scoped documents

NATIONAL CONTEXT

National Planning Policy For Waste, 2014

National Planning Policy Framework 2012

National Planning Practice Guidance, 2014

Planning Policy for Traveller Sites, 2015

Housing White Paper: Fixing our Broken Housing Market, 2017

Building our Industrial Strategy: Green Paper, 2017

Heritage in Local Plans: How to create a sound plan under the NPPF (2012)

Housing Act, 2004

Sustainable Energy Act, 2003

Sustainable Energy Act, 2006

Energy Act, 2013

Adapting to Climate Change: Ensuring Progress in Key Sectors, DEFRA 2013

UK Marine Policy Statement, 2013

Natural England Standing Advice for Protected Species, ongoing

Safeguarding our Soils, 2009

The Geological Conservation Review, ongoing

Water for People and the Environment: Water Resources Strategy Regional Action Plan Anglian Region, 2009

Planning Act, 2008

Climate Change Risk Assessment, 2012

Climate Change Act, 2008

Climate Change and Sustainable Energy Act, 2006

Making the Country Resilient to a Changing Climate, 2013

Localism Act 2011

Flood and Water Management Act 2010

Europe 2020: UK National Reform Programme 2013, April 2013

UK Renewable Energy Roadmap update, 2013

Sustainable Energy Report, 2010

The Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act, 2006

The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010

Neighbourhood Planning, DCLG 2012

Strategic Framework for Road Safety (DfT, May 2011)

Mainstream Sustainable Development: The Government's Vision and What this means in Practice, DEFRA 2011

Government Progress in Mainstreaming Sustainable Development, DEFRA, 2013

Lifetime homes, lifetime neighbourhoods – A national strategy for housing in an Ageing Society, 2008

Accessible Natural Green Space Standards in Towns and Cities: A Review and Toolkit for their Implementation (2003) and Nature Nearby: (2010)

UK Sustainable construction strategy, 2008

National Energy Policy Statement DECC, 2011

The Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000

Integrated Landscape Character Objectives, Landscape East 2010

England Coast Path: improving public access to the coast, 2014

Defra Securing the Future: Delivering the UK Sustainable Development Strategy 2011

Local Plan Experts Group Report to the Communities Secretary and to the Minister of Housing and Planning, 2016

Historic England Good Practice Advice in Planning, 2015

Historic England Corporate Plan, 2016-2019

Future Water – the governments water strategy for England 2011

Biodiversity duty: public authority to have regard to conserving biodiversity, 2014

Guidance on the planning for mineral extraction, 2014

DCLG Planning for schools, 2011

DCLC Written statement on SUDS 2014

Department of education, Home to school travel and transport guidance, 2014

DEFRA waste management plan for England, 2013

Water for life, White Paper, 2011

Water Act 2014

National Quality Mark Scheme for Land Contamination Management, January 2017

Guidance for NHS Commissioners on equality and health inequalities, 2015

Health inequalities, working together to reduce health inequalities 2014-15

REGIONAL AND LOCAL CONTEXT

New Anglia LEP Strategic Economic Plan, 2014

Leading the Way: Green Economy Pathfinder Manifesto 2012-15, New Anglia LEP

New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership Towards a Growth Plan, 2013

Schools Organisational Review, 2006

East Suffolk Growth Plan 2014-25

Suffolk Growth Strategy 2013

Greater Ipswich City Deal, 2013

Suffolk Coast Tourism Strategy 2013-2023

NHS Five Year Forward View, 2014

Ipswich Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2011-2016

Suffolk Joint Strategic Needs Assessment 2008-11

Ipswich and East Suffolk Clinical Commissioning Group Integrated Plan 2012/13-2014/15

Great Yarmouth and Waveney Joint Strategic Needs Assessment 2009/2010

Healthy Ambitions 2008-28, Nov 2008

Private Sector Housing Renewal Strategy 2007 with updates in 2009, 2010 and 2013

Lifetime homes, lifetime neighbourhoods – A national strategy for housing in an Ageing Society, 2008

Gypsy and Traveller Strategy 2009

Suffolk Coastal and Waveney Community Safety Partnership Plan 2015/16

Wild Anglia Manifesto, September 2013 Part One

Wild Anglia Manifesto, September 2013 Part Two

National Adaptation Programme, July 2013

Suffolk Climate Action Plan 2, 2012

National Air Quality Strategy for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland Vol 2 (2011)

The Air Quality Strategy for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland 2007

Water resources for the future: A Strategy for Anglian Region, 2001

Anglian Water: Water Resources Management Plan, 2014

Environment Agency Catchment Abstraction Management Strategies East Suffolk (CAMS), 2013

Environment Agency River Basin Management Plans Anglian River Basin District (RBMPs), 2015

Essex and Suffolk Water- Water Resources Management Plan, 2010-2035

Wildlife and Countryside Act (1981, as amended)

Butterfly Conservation – Regional Action Plan for Anglia (2000)

Suffolk Biodiversity Action Plan, 2012

State of Nature – Lowlands – future landscapes for wildlife (2004)

Suffolk Local Geodiversity Action Plan, 2006

In Step With Suffolk: Rights of Way Improvement Plan 2006-16

Suffolk Coast and Heaths AONB Management Strategy (June 2013-18)

Suffolk Coasts and Heaths Management Plan 2013-18

Keepers of Time – A Statement of Policy for England's Ancient & Native Woodlands: Action Plan 2005-7 (Forestry Commission)

East Suffolk Local Investment Plan 2010-2015, 2010

Touching the Tide Landscape Character Assessment August 2012 (Suffolk County Council Landscape Character Assessment)

Deben Estuary Plan, 2015

Alde and Ore Estuary Plan, 2016

Dementia-friendly Health and Social Care Environments, 2015

Hidden Needs in Suffolk, 2016 {Five years On (2011-2016)}

SUFFOLK COUNTY COUNCIL DOCUMENTS

NEIGHBOURING LOCAL AUTHORITY DOCUMENTS

Babergh District Council Local Plan Core Strategy and Policies 2011-2031, Feb 2014

Mid Suffolk District Council Core Strategy, 2008 (Focused Review 2012)

Babergh and Mid Suffolk Joint Local Plan Document, 2015

Ipswich Local Plan Core Strategy and Policies, 2017

Ipswich Local Plan Site Allocations and Policies, 2017

Waveney District Council, Issues and Options Document, 2016

Waveney and Suffolk Coastal Joint Environmental Policy, 2012

Mid Suffolk Strategic Flood risk assessment, March 2008

Suffolk Coastal and Waveney Strategic Flood risk assessment, Feb 2008

Babergh Strategic Flood Risk Assessment, March 2009

Ipswich Strategic Flood risk assessment, May 2011

Suffolk Local Flood Risk Management Strategy, February 2013

Ipswich Borough Council Air Quality Action Plan, 2008.

Ipswich Borough Council Cycling Strategy Supplementary Planning Document

Ipswich and Waveney Economic Areas - Employment Land Needs Assessment - Final Report, March 2016


Document title and reference points

Key objectives, targets and indicators relevant to plan and SA

Implications for the Local Plan

Implications for Sustainability Appraisal


NATIONAL CONTEXT


National Planning Policy for Waste, 2014


The National Planning Policy for Waste encourages a sustainable approach to waste management. It provides guidance about the identification of waste management sites and deciding planning applications for waste facilities. The policy also requires local authorities to monitor the use and take up of waste management facilities.


National Planning Policy Framework 2012



The NPPF sets out the Governments economic, environmental and social planning policies for England.  Taken together, these policies provide the Government's vision of sustainable development, which should be incorporated into local planning policies.  The Government aims to achieve sustainable development through:

  • Building a strong, competitive economy,
  • Ensuring the vitality of town centres,
  • Supporting a prosperous rural economy,
  • Promoting sustainable transport,
  • Supporting high quality communications,
  • Delivering a wide choice of high quality homes,
  • Requiring good design,
  • Promoting healthy communities,
  • Protecting green belt land,
  • Meeting the challenge of climate change, flooding and coastal change,
  • Conserving and enhancing the natural environment,

Facilitating the sustainable use of minerals.

Local Plans need to be produced in accordance with the NPPF and the Government's all encompassing approach to sustainable development.

The SA should include objectives which relate to all elements of the NPPF and the approach the Government is taking to achieving sustainable development.


National Planning Practice Guidance, 2014



The NPPG provides guidance on the interpretation and implementation of the NPPF.  The guidance also includes practical guidance on the planning system and the Community Infrastructure Levy. 

Local Plans need to be produced in accordance with the guidance outline in the NPPG.

The SA should be prepared in line with guidance on the NPPG. 


Planning Policy for Traveller Sites, 2015



The Government's aims in respect of traveller sites are:

  • That local planning authorities should make their own assessment of need for the purposes of planning.
  • To ensure that local planning authorities, working collaboratively, develop fair and effective strategies to meet need through the identification of land and sites.
  • Encourage local planning authorities to plan for sites over a reasonable timescale.
  • For plan making and decision taking to protect the Green Belt from inappropriate development.
  • Promote more private traveller sites while recognising that there will always be travellers who can not provide their own site.
  • To reduce the number of unauthorised developments and make enforcement more effective.
  • To increase the number of sites in appropriate locations with planning permission.
  • Reduce tensions between settled and traveller communities.
  • Enable provision of suitable accommodation from which travellers can access services and facilities.

Local Plans will need to develop policies that account for the requirements and ensure needs assessments are up to date.

The SA should include objectives that relate to social inclusion and housing provision.


Housing White Paper: Fixing our Broken Housing Market, 2017


Government White Paper outlining ways to fix the broken housing market by encouraging the construction of more homes.

Outlines a series of challenges, including:

  • Planning for the right homes in the right places.
  • Building homes faster.
  • Diversifying the market.
  • Helping people now.

Local Plans will need to take account of the changes proposed in the white paper.  Greater clarity required in respect of Objectively Assessed Housing Need, delivery rates, the process of plan making, generation of new communities.

The SA will need to consider objectives in respect of housing provision, community facilities and services.


Building our Industrial Strategy: Green Paper, 2017


The Government green paper sets out the approach to building an industrial strategy that addresses long term challenges to the UK economy by improving living standards and economic growth by increasing productivity and driving growth across the whole country.

The Industrial Strategy will be delivered by 10 pillars:

  1. Investing in science, research and innovation
  2. Developing skills
  3. Upgrading infrastructure
  4. Supporting businesses to start and grow
  5. Improving procurement
  6. Encouraging trade and inward investment
  7. Delivering affordable energy and clean growth
  8. Cultivating world leading sectors.
  9. Driving growth across the whole country
  10. Creating the right local institutions.

Local Plan policies will need to encourage economic growth across the whole plan area and take account of changing economic conditions and requirements to support businesses and enterprises.

The SA will need to consider objectives in relation to economic growth and development.


Heritage in Local Plans: How to create a sound plan under the NPPF (2012)


This document is a guide to local authorities from English Heritage on how to achieve the objectives of the NPPF for the historic environment and thereby pass the test for a sound local plan.

None.

Local plans should include polices relating the protection of built heritage.

Objectives on heritage protection and enhancement.


Housing Act, 2004


The purpose of this Act is to set standards for housing conditions and home information packs in connection with the sale of residential properties. The Act also covers the right to buy scheme and he accommodation needs of gypsies and travellers with particular regard to mobile homes.


Sustainable Energy Act, 2003


This Act places responsibilities on the Secretary of State to annually produce a sustainable energy report (beginning in 2004) on the progress made in regards to:

  • Cutting the United Kingdom's carbon emissions;
  • Maintaining the reliability of the United Kingdom's energy supplies
  • Promoting competitive energy markets in the United Kingdoms; and
  • Reducing the number of people living in fuel poverty in the United Kingdom. 

Sustainable Energy Act, 2006


This Act expands makes provision about the reduction of emissions of greenhouse gases, the alleviation of fuel poverty, the promotion of microgeneration and the use of heat produced from renewable sources.


Energy Act, 2013


The Act sets out new legislation to:

  • Reflect the availability of new technologies (such as CCS and emerging renewable technologies)
  • Correspond with our changing requirements for security of supply infrastructure (such as offshore gas storage)
  • Ensure adequate protection for the environment and the tax payer as our energy market changes.


None.

Local plans should encourage reductions in CO2 emissions and promote sustainable growth.

The SA should include objectives which encourage the reduction of CO2 emissions


Adapting to Climate Change: Ensuring Progress in Key Sectors, DEFRA 2013


This document sets out which organisations are involved in the second round of the Adaptive Reporting Power (ARP). It also details what information should be collected and how it should be reported. The ARP applies to all public organisations who might be affected by climate change or who may have to tackle the impacts of climate change in the future. The three aims of the ARP are to: ensure that climate change risk management is systematically undertaken; help ensure public service and infrastructure are resilient to climate change; monitor preparedness of key sectors to climate change. The first round of the ARP has already been completed and all organisations involved in that will also be involved in the second round.

Overarching objectives are to identify areas of risk to the public sector and assess the effectiveness of measures taken to combat risk. Planning authorities are not included in the scope of this exercise, which is unlikely to have any impact upon local plan document preparation. 


UK Marine Policy Statement, 2013


Provides the high level context within which national and subnational policies will be devised.

Simply marine planning regime and integrate it with terrestrial planning frameworks.  Objectives of marine planning include:

  • Environmental protection.
  • Extraction of supply of natural oil and gas.
  • Defence.
  • Shipping and ports.
  • Cabling.
  • Dredging and fishing.

Local planning authorities should ensure that Local Plan policies accord with the Marine Policy Statement and that the East Marine Inshore and Offshore Plans have been taken into account during preparation.

Local Plan Policies should promote development that safeguards and enhances the seas surrounding east Suffolk.

Ensuring economic development benefits and strengthens the marine economy.

Objective should consider the impact on the marine environment and economy. 


Natural England Standing Advice for Protected Species, ongoing


Natural England Standing Advice is standard advice for certain species, as well as ancient woodland and veteran trees, provided to local authorities when considering development applications. This includes how to ascertain whether a species may be present as well as any mitigation measures that may be necessary

Does development have a detrimental impact upon protected species and habitats?

Local plan documents that propose development for a particular place or area, such as site specific allocations and area action plans, should have regard to Natural England Standing Advice.

Objectives on biodiversity should be included in the SA.


Safeguarding our Soils, 2009



The Strategy highlights the areas for priority including:

  • Better protection for agricultural soils.
  • Protecting and enhancing stores of soil carbon.
  • Building resilience of soils to changing climate.
  • Preventing soil pollution.
  • Effective soil protection during construction and development.
  • Dealing with legacy of contaminated land.

The Local Plan should develop policies that promote brownfield / previously developed land sites for development.

The SA should include objectives that seek to protect greenfield sites.


The Geological Conservation Review, ongoing


The Geological Conservation Review is a review that identifies sites of geological value that are worthy of protection. As such this work is most relevant when considering planning applications or Local Plan allocations that may affect areas of geological value. Protected sites are now classified as Sites of Special Scientific Interest, which may contain more than one area of geological value.




This document should be taken into account when considering policies that may impact upon sites of geological value. 

Objectives on geodiveristy should be included in the SA.


Water for People and the Environment: Water Resources Strategy Regional Action Plan Anglian Region, 2009


This document describes how the Environment Agency will manage water resources up to 2050. This includes encouraging development that is more water efficient (both for homes and businesses) and encouraging agricultural users to develop ways of using water more efficiently, such as by constructing high flow reservoirs. Future water use scenarios are also tested and include the impact of more efficient use as well as population growth and economic expansion within the region. It is noted that the eastern region already experiences water stress and that this will increase over time due to the impact of climate change. Measures to increase resilience to more extreme weather events are also discussed.



Policies should encourage development that is water efficient and resilient to extreme weather events.

The local plan will need to specify the construction of increasingly water efficient buildings through regimes such as the code for sustainable homes. There is also the need to consider how to combat issues such as water stress in parts of the District and to deliver development that is not at risk of flooding from extreme weather events.

Ensure the SA has objectives to encourage the efficient use of water?

Ensure the SA has objectives to resilient in the face of extreme weather events caused by climate change?


Planning Act, 2008


The Act created two changes to the functioning of the planning system:

  • The establishment of an Infrastructure Planning Commission to make decisions on nationally significant infrastructure projects.
  • Creation of the Community Infrastructure Levy, a charge to be collected from developers by local authorities for the provision of local and sub-regional infrastructure.

Climate Change Risk Assessment, 2012


This is an extensive piece of research required by the Climate Change Act of 2008. As such it looks at the 11 key sectors and the positive and negative impacts upon each one. Sectors tested include buildings and transport infrastructure, business, health, agriculture and the natural environment. The CCRA also tests different possible responses to the threat of climate change and suggests future action points for central Government. This is an exercise that should be repeated every 5 years, with the next one being due in 2017.  


Climate Change Act, 2008


The Act commits the UK to action in mitigating the impacts of climate change.  It aims to improve carbon management and demonstrate UK leadership in moving to a low carbon economy.



  • Relevant commitments within the Act are:
  • The creation of a legally binding target of at least an 80% cut in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, to be achieved through action in the UK and abroad (against 1990 levels). Also a reduction in emissions of at least 34% by 2020.
  • A carbon budgeting system which caps emissions over five-year periods, to aid progress towards the 2050 target.
  • The creation of the Committee on Climate Change - a new independent, expert body to advise the Government on the level of carbon budgets and on where cost-effective savings can be made.
  • The inclusion of International aviation and shipping emissions in the Act or an explanation to Parliament why not - by 31 December 2012.
  • Further measures to reduce emissions, including: powers to introduce domestic emissions trading schemes more quickly and easily through secondary legislation; measures on biofuels; powers to introduce pilot financial incentive schemes in England for household waste; powers to require a minimum charge for single-use carrier bags (excluding Scotland).
  • New powers to support the creation of a Community Energy Savings Programme.

Local plan policies should promote sustainable economic growth and reduce carbon emissions.

Objective relating to reducing  greenhouse gas emissions and respective targets to be included in the SA.


Climate Change and Sustainable Energy Act, 2006


The principal purpose of this Act is to enhance the United Kingdom's contribution to combating climate change. This includes alleviating fuel poverty and securing a diverse and viable long-term energy supply. The first provisions will come into force after 21 August 2006.

A brief summary of the main provisions of the Climate Change and Sustainable Energy Act 2006 is as follows:

  • Microgeneration: The Act provides that the government must set and meet national targets for the number of installed microgeneration systems. In addition, the Act includes provisions to make energy companies pay a fair price for electricity from microgeneration. An effective way to address such targets could be through the incorporation of microgeneration provisions in public procurement contracts.
  • Reporting on greenhouse gas emissions: From 1 January 2007, the government will be required to report to Parliament on an annual basis on the level of greenhouse gas emissions in the UK and action being taken to reduce it.
  • Carbon emissions reduction obligation: This will replace the existing energy efficiency obligation, which encourages gas companies to promote efficient use of gas by consumers. The scope of the obligation will be broadened such that consumers will not only be encouraged to improve efficiency but also to use electricity / heat from microgeneration and low emissions sources.
  • Community energy and renewable heat: The government must promote community energy projects. This is likely to interact with the implementation of the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive, which sets out that district heating or cooling schemes should be considered before the construction of large new buildings. Local planning authorities may influence the success of community energy schemes through making planning permission for certain developments conditional on the use of such schemes.

Planning policies will need to promote the use of microgeneration systems where possible and that new development will be powered by renewable sources.

New development, particularly of larger buildings, should be encouraged to use community energy and heat sources. 

Planning policies will need to encourage development that is fuel efficient and minimises the use of gas.

The SA should include objectives which relate to climate change and the sustainable use of energy.


Making the Country Resilient to a Changing Climate, 2013



The report sets out visions for the following topic areas:

  • Built Environment.
  • Infrastructure.
  • Healthy and resilient communities.
  • Agriculture and Forestry.
  • Natural Environment.
  • Business
  • Local Government.

Local Plans should develop policies that account for resiliency aims that cross numerous topic areas.

SA objectives should seek better adaptation to climate change and increase the mitigation measures of climate change.


Localism Act 2011



The Localism Act contains a number of proposals to give local authorities new freedoms and flexibility shifting power from central government to local communities by:

  • New freedoms and flexibilities for local government,
  • Gives local authorities the formal legal ability and greater confidence to get on with the job of responding to what local people want,
  • Cuts red tape to enable councillors to play a full and active part in local life without legal challenge,
  • Encourages a new generation of powerful leavers with the potential to raise the profile of English cities,
  • Enable ministers to transfer functions to public authorities in cities in order to harness their potential for economic growth,
  • New rights and powers to local communities,
  • Makes it easier for local people to take over local amenities,
  • Ensures that local social enterprises get a change to change how things are done,
  • Enables local residents to call local authorities to account,
  • Reform to make the planning system clearer and more democratic,
  • Places significantly more influence into the hands of local people,
  • Provides appropriate support and recognition to communities who welcome more development,
  • Reform to ensure that decisions about housing are taken locally,
  • Enables local authorities to make their own decisions to adapt housing provision to meet local needs,

Gives local authorities more control over the funding of social housing.

Local Plan will need to take into account the new freedoms and greater flexibility afforded to local communities within the Localism Act.

The SA should include objectives relating to all aspects of Localism.


Flood and Water Management Act 2010



The Act will provide better, more comprehensive management of coastal erosion and flood risk for people, homes and businesses.  It also contains financial provisions related to the water industry.  The Act gives the Environment Agency an overview of all flood and coastal erosion risk management and the County Council the lead in managing the risk of floods.  It will also enable better management of water resources and quality, and will help to manage and respond to severe water events such as flood and drought.

Local Plans should take into account areas at risk from flooding and ensure that coastal erosion and flood management are incorporated as part of future growth and development proposals.

The SA should include objectives which relate to water management and protection of area at risk from flooding.


Europe 2020: UK National Reform Programme 2013, April 2013


This is a high level document that reports on the progress of central Government and the devolved administrations have made on the UK National Reform Programme. This includes economic reform and improving the Government's Fiscal Position. There are also measures to strengthen the housing market by increasing the financing available to first time buyers. Measures to promote economic growth include increasing youth employment, training opportunities and initiatives to reduce social exclusion. While there are sections on government policies about renewable energy and energy efficient development these tend to focus on reviewing actions at the national level rather than setting down a programme that has obvious implications for local authorities.   


UK Renewable Energy Roadmap update, 2013



Seek to provide 15% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Energy sources include onshore and offshore wind, marine energy, biomass electricity and heat, ground and air source heat pumps and renewable transport. This sets out actions at the level of central Government

Future policies in the Local Plan need to encourage sustainable forms of energy generation and production where possible.

SA should promote development that is energy efficient and increase the use of renewable energy.


Sustainable Energy Report, 2010


This report assesses progress in increasing energy efficiency in the UK household sector during 2009 and is produced under the Sustainable Energy Act, 2003.


The Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act, 2006


The act created Natural England and the Commission for Rural Communities and, amongst other measures, it extended the biodiversity duty set out in the Countryside and Rights of Way (CROW) Act to public bodies and statutory undertakers to ensure due regard to the conservation of biodiversity.

The Duty is set out in Section 40 of the Act, and states that every public authority must, in exercising its functions, have regard, so far as is consistent with the proper exercise of those functions, to the purpose of conserving biodiversity.

The aim of the biodiversity duty is to raise the profile of biodiversity in England and Wales, so that the conservation of biodiversity becomes properly embedded in all relevant policies and decisions made by public authorities.

The Duty applies to all local authorities, community, parish and town councils, police, fire and health authorities and utility companies.

The Government has produced guidance on implementing the Duty, contained in two publications, one for Local Authorities (and the other for other public bodies.

Section 41 of the NERC Act 2006, lists species and habitats of principal importance that local authorities must have regard for.



None.

Local plans should consider biodiversity protection.

The SA should include objectives relating to biodiversity


The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010


National Regulations which guide local authorities in respect of conservation of natural habitats and habitats of species


Neighbourhood Planning, DCLG 2012


Explanatory document on neighbourhood planning which will have to undergo individual SA processes.


Strategic Framework for Road Safety (DfT, May 2011)


This document highlights the high cost of road collisions, both economic and personal, much of which is avoidable. It includes various measures to tackle driving incidents and road safety generally. One of the themes is decentralisation of road safety control.

Fatalities to fall by 37% to 1,770 by 2020

Aim to reduce road safety risk to certain road users, such as cyclists. Road infrastructure should be considered when defining policy.

Transport modes have important link with sustainability and the SA should include objectives in relation to transport and sustainable modes of travel.


Mainstream Sustainable Development: The Government's Vision and What this means in Practice, DEFRA 2011



Coalition Government is committed to sustainable development and believes in going beyond the short term with eyes fixed firmly on the long term horizon shift in relation to our economy, our society and the environment.  The refreshed vision (2011) builds on the principles of the UK's Sustainable Development strategy published in 2005. 

Good progress has been made since the first UK Sustainable Strategy was published but Government recognises that Sustainable Development is a core strategic issue and needs to be embedded into policy and be transparent with independent scrutiny.

In order to further promote sustainable development, new measures to support this include:

  • Ministerial leadership and oversight,
  • Leading by example,
  • Embedding sustainable development in Government policy,

Transparency and independent scrutiny.

The Government's vision for mainstreaming sustainable development will be central to future Government policy and needs to be taken into account in all Local Plans.

The SA should include objectives which support and promote sustainable development.


Government Progress in Mainstreaming Sustainable Development, DEFRA, 2013



Government has developed a range of policies that are contributing towards a sustainable economy, thriving communities and am improved environment.  One of the key principles underlying the Government's approach to sustainable development is that growing the economy and improving the environment can be mutually supportive.  All departments of Government are required to include sustainable development commitments within their business plans and are asked to report on progress in Annual Reports and Accounts.

Government published first Annual Report on Greening Government Commitments in December 2012 – first year showed good progress has been made, but more work needs to be done to reduce environmental impacts by 2015.

The Government also published the NPPF in March 2012 which contains a presumption in favour of sustainable development and acts as a reference point for both plan production and decisions on individual planning applications.  The NPPF is clear that planning has an economic, social and environmental role in contributing to sustainable developments, and that it should pursue net gains across all three roles.

Document details the progress the Government has made with regards to mainstreaming sustainable development through partnership working on at the local, national and international levels.  But recognises that the delivery of sustainable development will always be a work in progress.

The progress report highlights that sustainable development is still at the heart of the plan making and decision making processes and is a key objective for the Government. 

Local authorities need to ensure that sustainable development is at the heart of all Local Plans.

The SA should include objectives to promote sustainable development across the district, in line with the Governments vision and the NPPF.


Lifetime homes, lifetime neighbourhoods – A national strategy for housing in an Ageing Society, 2008



Ageing society poses one of our greatest housing challenges as in the future; there will be a higher proportion of older age groups.  Today, most of our homes and communities are not designed to meet people's changing news as they grow older.  Older people's housing options are too often limited to care homes or sheltered housing.

Strategy is to ensure that people are able to stay within their own homes as they get older.  Promote housing standards which meet life time homes so that they provide the flexibility required as the population gets older.  Also a need to improve the integrations between housing and health care

Local Plans need to provide a range of housing types and tenures to meet the needs of the ageing population through providing the appropriate housing options and housing standards.

The SA should include objectives relating to providing the housing needed across the district as well as ensuring that it meets the specific requirements of residents.


Accessible Natural Green Space Standards in Towns and Cities: A Review and Toolkit for their Implementation (2003) and Nature Nearby: Accessible Green Space Guidance (2010)


These publications by Natural England explain and give guidance on the concept of Accessible Natural Green Space Standards (ANGSt).  The 2010 report provides practical advice to planning authorities on meeting the standards within new and existing developments.

ANGSt recommends that everyone, wherever they live, should have an accessible natural greenspace:

  • of at least 2ha in size, no more than 300m (5 minutes walk) from home;
  • at least one accessible 20ha site within 2km of home;
  • one accessible 100ha site within 5km of home; and
  • one accessible 500ha site within 10km of home; plus

a minimum of 1ha of statutory Local Nature Reserves per thousand population.

Local plan policies should ensure that ANGSt standards are met.

The SA should include objectives relating to access to natural greenspace


UK Sustainable construction strategy, 2008



Construction industry makes an important contribution to the competitiveness and prosperity of the economy.  The design, construction and operation of the built environment have important economic effects.  The Strategy for Sustainable Construction helps to deliver the UKs Sustainable Development Strategy.  Strategy is aimed at providing clarity around existing policy framework and signally the future direction of Government policy.  Aims to realise the shared vision of sustainable construction by providing clarity to business on Government's position by bringing together diverse regulations and initiatives relating to sustainability.  By setting and committing to higher standards to help achieve sustainability and by making specific commitments by industry and Government to take the sustainable construction agenda forward.

Local Plans need to encourage the increased use of sustainable construction techniques such as reducing carbon emissions, promoting good design, reducing water consumption and reducing waste going to landfill.

The SA should include objectives relating to sustainable construction which along with other measures promotes sustainable development across the district.


National Energy Policy Statement DECC, 2011



Document sets out national Government policy on the delivery of major energy infrastructure.  It sets out the need for and role of various different types of renewable / low carbon energy.  Potential impacts of renewable energy are listed along with a summary of how the Infrastructure Planning Commission will make decisions.

Local Plans need to take into account the legally binding target to cut greenhouse gas emissions by at least 80% by 2050 compared to 1990 levels.

The SA should include objectives relating to energy supply and consumption across the district.


The Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 


DEFRA produced The Countryside and Rights of Way Act and it received Royal Assent on 30 November 2000.  However, with the provision that it come into force in incremental steps over subsequent years.  Where the rights of the individual may be affected by measures contained in the act, a public consultation process is required.  The Act introduces a major new right as a result of the Government's 1997 manifesto, to give people greater freedom to explore the countryside, a right for which people have campaigned for over a hundred years.

The Act contains 5 parts and 16 Schedules, and focus on the following:

  • Introducing measures to improve public access to the open countryside and registered common land while recognising the legitimate interest of those who own and manage land concerned;
  • Amends the law relating to public rights of way to improve conservation of sensitive environments;
  • Providing increased protection of Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and strengthens wildlife enforcement legislation.  It provides a basis for the conservation of biological diversity; and
  • Providing for better management of Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).

Issue: Access to the Countryside

  • Access to the Countryside

DEFRA and the Countryside Agency are issued the responsibility by the Act to deliver a new right of public access on foot without having to stay on footpaths, to areas of open land comprising mountain, moor, heath, down and registered common land.  It also contains provisions for extending the right to coastal land.  Safeguards are provided to take into account the needs of landowners and occupiers, and of other interests, including wildlife.

Local Plans can play a role in safeguarding wildlife and sensitive habitats from access to the public where necessary

Consider objectives and indicators indicating conflict between public access to land and sensitive environments and habitats.


Issue: Public Rights of Way and Road Traffic

  • Public Rights of Way and Road Traffic

Rights of way legislation are encouraged by the creation of new routes and clarifying uncertainties about existing rights in the Act.  Particularly important in terms of nature conservation, the Act introduces powers enabling the diversion of rights of way to protect SSSIs and enabling traffic regulation orders to be made for the purpose of conserving an area's natural beauty. 

Local Plans can play a role in identifying where environments and habitats including SSSIs is in conflict with existing or proposed rights of way

Consider objectives and indicators indicating conflict between traffic and sensitive environments and habitats.


Issue: Nature Conservation and wildlife projection

  • Nature Conservation and Wildlife Protection

A duty is placed on Government Departments by the Act to regard conservation of biodiversity as an important consideration.  It places a duty on the departments to maintain lists of species and habitats for which conservation steps should be taken and promoted, in accordance with the Convention on Biological Diversity.

Schedule 9 of the Act changes the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.  The schedule amends SSSI notification procedures and provides increased powers for the protection and management of SSSIs.  The provisions extend powers for entering into management agreements, and place a duty on public bodies to further the conservation and enhancement of SSSIs.  The Act introduces an increase in penalties on conviction where the provisions are breached, with a new offence whereby third parties can be convicted for damaging SSSIs.  To ensure compliance with the Human Rights Act 1998, appeal processes are introduced with regards to the notification, management and protection of SSSIs.

Schedule 12 of the Act amends the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, strengthening the legal protection for threatened species.  The provision make certain offences arrestable, create a new offence of reckless disturbance, confer greater powers to police and wildlife inspectors for entering premises and obtaining wildlife tissue samples for DNA analysis, and enable heavier penalties on conviction of wildlife offences.

Local Plans can play a role in identifying where the conservation of species and habitats, SSSIs and threatened species needs additional protection.

Consider objectives and indicators relating to threatened species, sensitive environments, SSSI and management of this. 


Issue: Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty

  • Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty

The Act clarifies the procedure and purpose of designating AONBs, and consolidates the provision of previous legislation.  It requires local authorities to produce management plans for each AONB, and enables the creation of Conservation Boards in order to assume responsibility for AONBs, particularly where the land designated crosses several local authority jurisdictions.  The Act also requires all relevant authorities to have regard to the purpose of conserving and enhancing the natural beauty of AONBs when performing their functions.

Local Plans can assist in the identification, designation, management and monitoring of AONBs.

Consider objectives and indicators regarding the state and the management of AONBs.


Issue: Miscellaneous and Supplementary

The Act makes provision for the establishment of local access forums and provide functions for forums in some cases.  It determines that decision-making authorities should have regard to forum's view in reaching decisions and that Management Agreements can be entered into regarding land for conservation.  

Local Plans can identify where forums and management agreements might be useful.  

Consider objectives and indicators to identify conservation areas where there would be a need for a management forum or an agreement.


Integrated Landscape Character Objectives, Landscape East 2010


This is an inventory of different landscape types found within the east of England. For each type of landscape there is information about the physical environment, vegetation, historic environment and visual qualities. There are also a set of management objectives for each type of landscape.

Policies should protect the environment, vegetation, historic environment and visual appearance of a particular landscape type.

Development should be sympathetic to the surrounding local landscape.

The local plan should seek to protect and enhance the character of the District. This is complicated by the fact that both Districts contain a considerable variety of different landscapes and these need protection and enhancement through the local plan.

Policies should protect the environment, vegetation, historic environment and visual appearance of a particular landscape type.

Development should be sympathetic to the surrounding local landscape.


England Coast Path: improving public access to the coast, 2014


The Government's aim is to create a new National Trail around England's entire coast.

For the first time people will have the right of access around all our open coast.  This includes – where appropriate – any land, other than the trail itself, which forms part of the coastal margin and which has public rights of access along the way.  Natural England expects to complete work on the England Coast Path in 2020.

Local Plan policies need to ensure that access to the England coast path is provided for the benefit of all.  Work on the district's coastline is estimated to start in 2017-2018.

The SA should include objectives in respect of the coast environment and access to the coastal areas.

Defra Securing the Future: Delivering the UK Sustainable Development Strategy 2011


The Government's main sustainable development strategy

Enable all people throughout the world to satisfy their basic needs and enjoy a better quality of life without compromising the quality of life for future generations.  Four shard priorities:

  • Sustainable consumption and production
  • Climate change and energy
  • Natural resource protection and environmental enhancement
  • Sustainable communities.

Develop policies that meet sustainable development aims and objectives.

Sustainability objectives that cover the priorities of sustainable development across multiple topic areas.


Local Plan Experts Group Report to the Communities Secretary and to the Minister of Housing and Planning, 2016


Report to consider how local plan making can be made more efficient and effective.

Identifies the multiple difficulties facing plan makers, into three principal headings:

  • Authorities are struggling to meet the requirements of a complex local plan process.
  • Housing needs are not being met; and
  • Communities are turned off by the length, slow pace and obscure nature of many local plans.

Future Local Plan policies should take into account the issues raised in the Experts Group report and other examples of best practice.

SA objectives should be clear and transparent to ensure greater understanding by all.


Historic England Good Practice Advice in Planning, 2015



This report is made up of three separate 'Good Practice Advice in Planning' notes. The purpose of these reports is to assist LPAs and others in implementing historic environment policy in the NPPF and PPG.

The documents emphasise that information needed in support of applications for planning and listed buildings consent should be no more than is necessary to reach informed decisions.

The Local Plan can acknowledge the need to preserve the historic environment; Managing change within the setting of heritage assets, including archaeological remains and historic buildings, sites, areas, and landscapes.

SA objectives should aim to minimise the risk to historic assets, and reduce the pressure put on them through the panning system.


Historic England Corporate Plan, 2016-2019



Document sets out Historic England aims over the three year period:

  1. Champion England historic environment.
  2. Identify and protect England's special historic buildings and places.
  3. Promote change that safeguards historic buildings and places.
  4. Help those who care for historic buildings and places, including owners, local authorities, communities and volunteers.
  5. Engage with the whole community to foster the widest possible sense of ownership of our national inheritance of buildings and places.
  6. Support the work of the English Heritage Trust in managing and safeguarding the National Heritage Collection of buildings and monuments and to achieve financial self sufficiency
  7. Work effectively, efficiently and transparently.

The Local Plan will need to develop policies that protect the historic environment and important heritage assets.

SA objectives that consider the contribution of historical assets to the built environment.


Future Water – the governments water strategy for England 2011


This document outlines how to manage water supply in order to become more efficient in all aspects.

Document identifies current status and issues regarding water use and outlines ways to ensure a sustainable delivery of water supplies and protected water environment. The following areas are discussed:

  • Water demand
  • Water supply
  • Water quality in the natural environment
  • Surface water drainage
  • River and coastal flooding
  • Greenhouse gas emissions
  • Charging for water
  • Regulatory framework, completion and innovation
  • Working together

The Local Plan will need to seriously consider the risk of flooding and drainage issues when planning future developments.

SA objectives should clearly be aimed at helping achieve the visions that are set out in this document.


Biodiversity duty: public authority to have regard to conserving biodiversity, 2014


This document underlines the responsibility of public authorities to include biodiversity in everything they do.

Understanding that as a public authority, we have a duty to have regard to conserving biodiversity as part pf a policy or decision.

The Local Plan will need to show our duty to have regard for biodiversity.

SA objectives should clearly show that regard for biodiversity has been carefully considered.


Guidance on the planning for mineral extraction, 2014


This document provides information about minerals and the way they are/can be extracted. The document can then be used to advise planners to ensure that new developments don't have any effect on mineral extraction.

Understanding that when planning new developments, mineral extraction is carefully considered. The following steps will help achieve this:

  • Consult with mineral industries, other LA and local communities
  • Add mineral safeguarding areas to policy maps

Other topics in the document include:

  • Minerals safeguarding
  • Planning for minerals extraction
  • Assessing environmental impacts from minerals extraction
  • Charging for site visits
  • Restoration and aftercare of minerals sites
  • Planning for aggregate minerals
  • Planning for industrial minerals
  • Planning for hydrocarbon extraction
  • Planning for coal extraction
  • Minerals planning orders

The Local Plan will need to consider both present and future mineral extraction.

SA objectives that consider mineral extraction.


DCLG Planning for schools, 2011


Policy statement to increase the number of state funded schools through the planning system.

Support the development of state funded schools and their delivery through the planning system.

Work together with all parties to help form strong planning applications for state funded schools.

Planning conditions should only be absolutely necessary to making the development acceptable in planning terms.

Future local plan policies will need to be in place to help ensure there are a sufficient number of state funded schools within the district.

SA objectives that consider requirements for schools.


DCLC Written statement on SUDS 2014


Written statement on sustainable drainage systems for proposals of more than 10 dwellings.

Developments of 10 dwellings or more should have a sustainable drainage system in place, unless demonstrated to be inappropriate.

Consult with lead local flood authorities on the management of surface water.


SA objectives that consider the role of SuDS.


Department of education, Home to school travel and transport guidance, 2014


This is statutory guidance from the Department of Education in relation to school travel and transport, and sustainable travel.

Regularly review travel policies, arrangements and contracts.

Promote use of sustainable travel

Ensure transport arrangements are in place for all eligible children

Assess the travel and transport needs of children and young people within the district.

Future local plan policies will need to be in place to ensure that travel arrangements are in place for every child eligible whilst achieving this in a sustainable way.

SA objectives that promote sustainable transport (and better air quality).


DEFRA waste management plan for England, 2013


Waste management plan for England which provides analysis of the current waste management situation. The plan does not introduce new policies or change the landscape of how waste is managed in England.

The plan was created on the bases of the following key objectives:

  • Protect material assets
  • Reduce Air Emissions contributing to global problems
  • Reduce Air Emissions of local relevance
  • Protect and enhance biodiversity
  • Conserve water resources and water quality
  • Conserve and improve soil quality
  • Protect and enhance landscape and historic environment

The local plan should look to promote and help achieve the objectives that the report is based on.

SA objectives that are in accordance with the waste hierarchy.


Water for life, White Paper, 2011



This white paper is centred on the current water situation in the UK and shows the fact that action needs to be taken in making our water use more sustainable. The white paper takes forward the new "catchment-based approach"

Ofwat target to get water companies to reduce demand by 5 litres per property per day over 5 years.

Reduce leakage by 3% between 2009/10 - 2015


SA objectives that promote the sustainable use of water.


Water Act 2014



Informed and to implement some of the plans by/in White Paper and Water for life. Received assent 14/05/2014. The government wants to make sure that everyone can have a secure supply of water at a fair price, now and in the future. Cite  need to reform the way we regulate abstraction. The system needs to be more adaptable and allow more effective sharing of water resources and continue efforts to reduce water abstractions that could damage the environment. .  The Environment Agency's Restoring Sustainable Abstraction Programme is used to review and investigate those sites in England and Wales where the habitat or ecology dependent on the water is at risk as a result of unsustainable abstraction, use River Basin Management Plans to protect and improve the water environment.


SA objectives that promote the sustainable use of water.


National Quality Mark Scheme for Land Contamination Management, January 2017



The National Quality Mark Scheme for Land Contamination Management (NQMS) is a scheme that has been developed by the Land Forum to provide visible identification of documents that have been checked for quality by a Suitably Qualified and experienced Person (SQP). It will provide increased confidence and improved quality of submissions made under regulatory regimes, particularly planning applications, related to previously used land. The aim is to provide increased confidence and improved quality of submissions made under regulatory regimes, particularly planning applications, related to previously used land. The Land Forum has facilitated the development of a nationally recognised system for ensuring a satisfactory standard of work that, through endorsement by the Forum and through joint ownership by Land Forum members, can be considered to have support and acceptance across the community.The initiative is supported in principle by the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) and a positive response has also been received from individual devolved administrations.

Land contamination, or the possibility of it, is a material consideration for the purposes of town and country planning. This means that a planning authority has to consider the potential implications of contamination both when developing plans and when it is considering individual applications for planning permission. Although the NQMS can be applied to the management of land contamination under a range of different regulatory regimes its primary focus is to improve the quality of work done to manage land contamination under the Town and Country planning system.

The scheme has been designed to assist planning authorities in determining planning applications and discharging planning conditions. The aspiration being to speed up the overall planning process and limit the costs incurred by both public and private sector participants.

Within this context the NQMS should provide assurance to Developers (who retain the legal responsibility for adequately dealing with land contamination problems)3 and to Regulator(s)4 that the risks arising from land contamination have been adequately assessed and dealt with5.

SA objectives that promote the clean up of contaminated land.


Guidance for NHS Commissioners on equality and health inequalities, 2015



This guidance is to support Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) and NHS England in meeting their legal duties in respect of equality and health inequalities. CCGs and NHS England play key roles in addressing equality and health inequalities; as commissioners, as employers and as local and national system leaders, in creating high quality care for all.


Promotion of health and wellbeing for all through the SA objectives.


Health inequalities, working together to reduce health inequalities 2014-15



Not sure if relevant but The criteria cover:

  • governance, accountability and monitoring arrangements
  • being strategic and evidence-based
  • working collaboratively with partners
  • addressing health inequalities across main priorities such as reducing premature mortality
  • improving access and outcomes for vulnerable groups

Promotion of health and wellbeing for all through the SA objectives.


REGIONAL AND LOCAL CONTEXT


New Anglia LEP Strategic Economic Plan, 2014



Ambitious to transform the economy of Norfolk and Suffolk and establish the area as a centre of global business excellence by harnessing distinct sector strengths and natural assets to deliver more jobs, new businesses and housing.

Targets include:

  • 95,000 more jobs,
  • 10,000 new businesses,
  • Improved productivity
  • 117,000 new homes

New Anglia LEP plans to capitalise on global strengths in areas such as agri-tech and life sciences, energy, ICT and creative digital to accelerate growth in the economy.  Central focus is to drive growth in high impact sectors in order to create new high value jobs and to work with existing businesses to improve their productivity and competitiveness.

The Strategic Economic Plan lists commitments which should be taken into account in by local planning authorities.

The SA should include objectives that will support growth and the provision of jobs alongside future residential opportunities to improve the overall productivity of Norfolk and Suffolk.


Leading the Way: Green Economy Pathfinder Manifesto 2012-15, New Anglia LEP



The New Anglia LEP area is ideally suited to leading the UK's transition to a green economy across three focus areas: low carbon, natural capital and social capital.  As the driest, low lying area of the country, New Anglia is at the frontline of climate change and the LEP is determined that the green economy agenda should not be restricted by constraints.

Mission is for Norfolk and Suffolk to:

  • Grown sustainably and for the long term,
  • Use natural resources efficiently,
  • Be more resilient,

Build on current experience and exploit comparative advantages.

The Green Economy Manifesto encourages the transition to a green economy and raising the green agenda across Norfolk and Suffolk.  Measures to promote the green agenda can be incorporated into future Local Plan documents.

The SA should include objectives which support and promote the green economy across the IHMA.


New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership Towards a Growth Plan, 2013


A vision for New Anglia in 2025 which will have more jobs, businesses and prosperity.  To achieve the ambitious targets public sector, private business, voluntary sector and government all need to invest together to achieve them.

To achieve this growth, the LEP will need to:

  • Building on our strengths.
  • Growing Key Sectors.
  • The Green Economy.
  • Supporting Businesses.
  • Building our skilled workforce.
  • Enabling infrastructure for business.
  • Attracting inward investment

Local Plan Policies need to encourage economic growth through a variety of ways to ensure that the right skills are delivered alongside the right infrastructure and investment.

Economic Growth and prosperity is a key element of sustainability that the SA needs to consider.


Schools Organisational Review, 2006


This document reviews the school system of two and three tiers, largely about whether middle schools should be reduced in number. Pupil performance at different ages and within different school types is considered. The following recommendations are made: performance should be improved generally; the county move toward a two-tier system; village school should be retained; the optimum size of secondary schools is 1200; sixth forms should be no less than 200 in number.


East Suffolk Growth Plan 2014-25



The purpose of the East Suffolk Growth Plan is to add value and provide a more local focus for the growth ambitions on the Suffolk Growth Strategy and the East Suffolk Growth Plan.  The East Suffolk Growth Plan sets out growth ambitions through the development and enhancement of key sectors and strategic growth locations as outlined in the Local Plans for Suffolk Coastal and Waveney District Councils.  By 2025, East Suffolk will be more prosperous with more businesses, stronger businesses and more jobs – this will be done by protecting and enhancing natural coastal assets, strengthening world leading businesses and key sectors and by making the most of East Suffolk's unique location.

The plan sets a target for 10,000 new jobs between 2012 and 2025.  It aims to raise GVA per person to £21,500 in line with the New Anglia average.  Aims to facilitate the creation of 900 new enterprises by 2025. 

Local Plans will need to encourage the creation of over 10,000 jobs by 2025, as well as creating the right conditions to increase Gross Value Added per person in East Suffolk so that it is in excess of the national average.  Will facilitate the creation of at least 900 new enterprises by 2025.

The SA should include objectives relating to job creation and economic growth across the district.


Suffolk Growth Strategy 2013



The growth strategy provides a broad framework and vision on how to encourage business to be successful.  It provides opportunities for growth in different sectors of the economy as well as identifies a potential to create thousands of additional high value and highly skilled jobs in the county.  The strategy aims to address the barriers to growth and sets out objectives associated with inward investment, economic growth, improvement of skills and education and improvement of infrastructure.

Local Plans need to highlight the principal locations of growth as agreed by county and district councils.  Such as Ransomes Europark, Adastral Park Expansion and strategic improvements to the A12.

The SA needs to include objectives that relate to economic growth, improvement of educational attainment and employability as well as inward investment.


Greater Ipswich City Deal, 2013



Greater Ipswich City Deal will drive forward local growth by empowering Greater Ipswich, Suffolk and the wider New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership to make the most of their economic assets and opportunities.  Greater Ipswich has an unprecedented opportunity to grow in the coming decade as there is major development potential in key industrial sectors including energy, ICT, financial services, advanced manufacturing, logistics, biotechnology and agri-tech.  The City Deal will enable local partners to help develop the skills and business base necessary to ensure residents have the right skills at the right time to secure opportunities.

Local Plans will be required to assist and facilitate the economic growth and investment outlined within the City Deal which focuses on seeking economic opportunities as well as increasing the skill levels of young people through a youth guarantee.

The SA should include objectives relating to economic growth and appropriate access to education and training opportunities across the district.


Suffolk Coast Tourism Strategy 2013-2023


The purpose of the Suffolk Coast Tourism Strategy is to set the overall framework for developing and promoting sustainable tourism between 2013 and 2023. The strategy establishes the current strengths, challenges and opportunities for future tourism growth. This is advised by detailed assessments of the tourism character and profile of the Suffolk Coast as a destination; and the market characteristics of existing  and potential visitors.



Objectives to 2023

2.6 A full list of the objectives can be found in the following strategy, but the broad objectives

are outlined below.

• Develop a cycle network for each of the Tourism Character Areas

• Adopt an 'Attract and Disperse' approach to encourage wider use of the area where there is capacity for visitors.

• Emphasise the changing seasons to spread visitor footfall and generate overnight stays throughout the year.

• Integrate local food and highlight seasonal produce for the tourism experience.

• Develop unique packages for wildlife enthusiasts and encourage the use of trails through interpretation and stories.

• Promote sustainable transport and develop integrated travel networks e.g. to link walkers/cyclists to the rail network.

• Encourage visitor contributions to the AONB Community and Conservation (Visitor Giving) scheme.

• Develop a Destination Management Organisation for Suffolk Coast to involve business, community, local authorities.

• Encourage modest/appropriate/widely supported development of additional amenities e.g. family attractions.

Local Plan to promote tourism opportunities across the district.

SA Framework to include objectives relating to tourism, economic growth and inward investment.


NHS Five Year Forward View, 2014


This document sets the template for how the NHS will meet the challenges of the next five years. This includes greater integration between different services and departments, a more patient centric approach to care and a reorganisation of GP care. Crucially, the NHS has to continue to save money and operate more efficiently.


Ipswich Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2011-2016



The vision is to improve the health and wellbeing of the people of Ipswich and support them in adopting a healthy lifestyle.  Priorities include:

  • To develop and implement an action plan to meet the vision,
  • Reduce health inequalities,
  • Promote healthy lifestyles and healthy communities,

Collate local information on health and wellbeing issues and to address them.

Local Plans should explore the cross boundary opportunities available to promote healthy lifestyles, recreational facilities and access to open spaces.

The SA should include objectives which relate to improving health and access to services and facilities across the district.


Suffolk Joint Strategic Needs Assessment 2008-11


Completing a Joint Strategic Needs Assessment is a statutory requirement of local authorities.

The Suffolk JSNA identifies current and future health and well-being needs in the light of existing services, and informs future service planning, taking into account evidence of effectiveness.

Revisions to the Local Plan should use the most up to date information available on health and well being to ensure mechanisms are in place to tackle social deprivation within the County.

SA Framework to include objectives relating to improving the overall health of the population.


Ipswich and East Suffolk Clinical Commissioning Group Integrated Plan 2012/13-2014/15


This integrated plan sets out a high level strategy for ensuring delivery of operational, financial and improvement plans, for the period 2011/12 to 2014/15 by NHS Ipswich and East Suffolk Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG).


Local Policies that relate to social wellbeing and health should incorporate key targets set out within the Ipswich and East Suffolk Clinical Commissioning Group Integrated Plan.

SA Framework to include objectives relating to improving the overall health of the population.


Great Yarmouth and Waveney Joint Strategic Needs Assessment 2009/2010


This JSNA identifies current and future health and well-being needs in the light of existing services, and informs future service planning, taking into account evidence of effectiveness.

The JSNA identified several important issues facing neighbouring  authority areas, which should be addressed through key policies and appropriate land and service management.

Revisions to the Local Plan should use the most up to date information available on health and well being to ensure mechanisms are in place to tackle social deprivation within the District.

SA Framework to include objectives relating to improving the overall health of the population.


Healthy Ambitions 2008-28, Nov 2008


Healthy Ambitions is a not for profit independent charity working to promote healthy lifestyles within Suffolk. The charity works with a range of partners in the public, voluntary and business sectors to improve and encourage healthy living.


Private Sector Housing Renewal Strategy 2007 with updates in 2009, 2010 and 2013



Strategy sets out how the Council will address private sector housing issues in the district and link with wider sub regional strategies and statutory duties.  The four key priorities that the policy will address are:

• Decent homes for vulnerable people,

• Provision of affordable housing,

• Energy conservation,

• Helping the elderly to stay in their own homes.

Local Plans should take into account the housing needs of the wider community by promoting a range and choice of housing type and tenure.

The SA Objectives should include measures to ensure that housing opportunities for all sectors of the community are provided.


Lifetime homes, lifetime neighbourhoods – A national strategy for housing in an Ageing Society, 2008


This strategy sets out  a series of targets to address  the challenge of housing for and increasing aging population. It also outlines our plans for making sure that there is enough appropriate housing available in future to relieve the forecasted unsustainable pressures on homes, health and social care services.


Gypsy and Traveller Strategy 2009



Gypsy and Traveller Strategy will continue to support communities by providing a framework for:

Improving community cohesion by promoting good relations between Gypsies and Travellers and the settled community

  • Increasing awareness and understanding of Gypsy and Traveller needs, culture and lifestyle,
  • Managing unauthorised encampments in Suffolk and helping to ensure that accommodation needs and other welfare issues are addressed.
  • Further generating knowledge and understanding of hate crime and encourage Gypsy and Traveller communities to report it.
  • Working to reduce and eliminate harassment and discrimination towards Gypsy and Traveller communities.
  • Improving fire safety and personal welfare for Gypsies and Travellers in Suffolk.
  • Improving access to learning for pre-school, young people and adults on Gypsy and Traveller sites.
  • Improving health and health education amongst Gypsies and Travellers

The strategy sets out how agencies and authorities can work cohesively in order to address the key issues pertaining to Gypsy and Travellers.

The Core Strategy includes a strategic policy (SP4) in relation to Gypsies, Travellers and Travelling Show people and outlines that site specific provision will be made through a Gypsies, Travellers and Travelling Show people Site Specific Allocations Local Plan to be produced in the future.

The SA should include objectives relating to providing housing for all sectors of the community as well as increasing access to health facilities and education opportunities.


Suffolk Coastal and Waveney Community Safety Partnership Plan 2015/16


The Crime and Disorder Act 1998 created community Safety Partnerships under which local authorities and the police should work together to reduce crime and disorder. This includes drawing up a plan with a series of objectives, together with details about how these will be achieved. This includes nominating responsible organisations who will be responsible for achieving particular objectives. Other organisations involved include the NHS and the Suffolk Fire and Rescue Service.  


Wild Anglia Manifesto, September 2013 Part One


Wild Anglia is part of the New Anglia Local Economic Partnership. It is charged with promoting the protection of the environment and also looking at ways in which the natural environment can support economic growth and personal wellbeing. Part One of the Wild Anglia Manifesto is a high level document that sets out the organisation's objectives:

  1. Economic Growth: Nature will make a full contribution to the success of the economy.
  2. Exemplary 'green infrastructure': insisting on the best projects for people, nature and the economy.
  3. Strengthening nature: creating, improving and investing in the natural environment.
  4. Healthy, happy society: making the most of nature's capacity to improve lives.

The document goes on to talk about the structure of the organisation and the culture in which it operates, of encouraging debate and tackling difficult issues.


Wild Anglia Manifesto, September 2013 Part Two


This is a more detailed document that seeks to guide implementation of the 4 key objectives detailed in part one, as well as the Green Manifesto prepare by New Anglia LEP.


National Adaptation Programme, July 2013


The National Adaptation Programme was based on the findings of the Climate Change Risk Assessment, which was produced in response to the Climate Change Act, 2008. The NAP is organised around a series of objectives, together with guidance about how these will be achieved. 

Objective 1: To work with individuals, communities and organisations to reduce the threat of flooding and coastal erosion, including that resulting from climate change, by understanding the risks of flooding and coastal erosion, working together to put in place long-term plans to manage these risks and making sure that other plans take account of them.

Objective 2: To provide a clear local planning framework to enable all participants in the planning system to deliver sustainable development, including infrastructure that minimises vulnerability and provides resilience to the impacts of climate change.

The Local Plan should include policies which relate to Climate Change and adaptation to this.

The SA should include objectives in relation to climate change adaptation.


Suffolk Climate Action Plan 2, 2012


This document is produced by local authorities in tandem with the Environment Agency, Sustainability East, University College Suffolk and other organisations. It outlines the potential impact of climate change within Suffolk and sets goals for helping the County to adapt to climate change. The document lists objectives for businesses and private households (and these are listed below). It also sets out a road map about how these will be achieved, including more energy efficient buildings and a stronger emphasis on renewable energy.



The document does not have any binding targets but does aspire for businesses and households in Suffolk to achieve the following:

  • Reduce carbon emissions by 60% on 2004 levels by 2025
  • Support the development of a green economy, including reducing the CO2 produced in the production and delivery of products and services
  • Adapt to the impacts of climate change, including extreme weather and resource scarcity

Local plan policies should promote energy efficient design for business premises and private houses.

Local plan policies should encourage the development of renewable energy facilities, both as stand alone facilities and as part of wider developments.

The SA should objectives which encourage energy efficient design and construction


National Air Quality Strategy for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland Vol 2 (2011)


This document provides the scientific basis for the Air Quality Management Strategy for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, produced in 2007.


The Air Quality Strategy for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland 2007



The Strategy sets out air quality objectives and policy options to further improve air quality in the UK to deliver environmental, health and social benefits.  It examines the costs and benefits of air quality improvement proposals, the impact of exceedances of the strategy's air quality objectives, the effect on ecosystems and the qualitative impacts.

The national strategy sets objectives and targets for each air quality pollutant and Local Plans will need to take into account air quality as part of policy options

The SA should include objectives relating to the quality of air quality and improving the environment for all communities.


Water resources for the future: A Strategy for Anglian Region, 2001


Vision

Abstraction of water that is environmentally and economically sustainable, providing the right amount of water for people, agriculture, commerce and industry, and an improved water-related environment.


Framework needs to include the sustainable use of water.


Objectives

Strategy will help achieve the following objectives:

  • Illustrate the impact of different social and economic choices on future water use;
  • Manage water resources in a way that causes no long-term degradation of the environment;
  • Improve the state of existing degraded catchments;
  • Ensure that water is available to those who need it, and that it is used wisely by all;
  • Indicate the present state of water resources;
  • cater robustly for risks and uncertainties;
  • promote the value of water to society and the environment;
  • review feasible water management options, including innovative solutions where appropriate;
  • provide a framework for logical decisions to be taken at the right time;
  • identify actions and opportunities for the Environment Agency and others to work together to achieve the Vision.

Local Plan will need to consider.  The baseline can be used to inform policies.

SA Framework includes objectives to maintain and improve water quality where possible


Anglian Water: Water Resources Management Plan, 2014


This document provides a flexible plan that will enable Anglian Water to continue to supply customers in the region in the face of climate changing, reductions in water resources and an expanding population.

A flexible and adaptive plan that commits them to reducing leakage and consumption by at least 139Ml/d. It also increases the volume of water they trade and transfers resources from areas of surplus to areas of deficit. Ultimately, these measures may not be enough to meet AWs long-term future supply-demand needs. To prepare for this possibility AW are promoting the Water Resource East Anglia (WREA) project. This innovative water resource planning initiative will be completed in AMP6 and follows from work with the National Drought Management Group and projects completed with the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership


Environment Agency Catchment Abstraction Management Strategies East Suffolk (CAMS), 2013


The main aim of CAMS are:

  • To inform the public on water resources and licensing practice
  • To provide a consistent approach to local water resources management, recognising the reasonable needs of water users and the environment
  • To provide the opportunity for greater public involvement in managing the water resources of a catchment

Environment Agency River Basin Management Plans Anglian River Basin District (RBMPs), 2015


RBMPs are the means by which the sustainable development principles of the European Directive on Water Management will be implemented at the local scale by the Environment Agency. RBMPs will be produced for each River Basin District on a 6-year cycle, with first plans being published for consultation in 2008.


Aims of the Directive

  • to prevent deterioration of water quality and restore polluted bodies of water;
  • to establish a legal framework to protect surface and groundwaters;
  • to take into account economic and technical considerations so that schemes are good value for money and feasible.

Plan policies should assess how these aims and emerging RBMP policies can be reflected in planning policies for water management and quality.

Water quality and management should be considered in SA.


The RBMP process

Where risk assessments show water bodies are not meeting their environmental objectives, measures will be identified and put in place to achieve them.

Plan policies should assess how these aims and emerging RBMP policies can be reflected in planning policies for water management and quality.

Water quality and management should be considered in SA.


Essex and Suffolk Water- Water Resources Management Plan, 2010-2035


This strategy is very comprehensive and looks at the water resources available in the district.

Considers the impact of climate change and estimates of how available water resources will change over time. The strategy also looks at different types of demand and how the available water resources will continue to meet these in the future.

The local plan should take account of the water resources available and how future development will be met. It will be necessary to promote water efficient development and avoid development in areas that are experiencing water stress or have inadequate fresh water infrastructure.

SA Framework to include objectives relating to water management and flood risk.


Wildlife and Countryside Act (1981, as amended)



The Wildlife and Countryside Act implements the Wild Birds Directive (79/409/EEC).  It is one of the major pieces of legislation under which UK wildlife is protected.  The Act gives broad protection to all wild birds (with some exceptions) and also gives varying degrees of protection to other species of animals and plants.

Local Plan policies need to include policies to protect wildlife and protected species.

Framework needs to include biodiversity and protected species


Butterfly Conservation – Regional Action Plan for Anglia (2000)



This action plan identifies high, medium and low priority butterflies and moths in Cambridgeshire, Essex, Norfolk and Suffolk.  It identifies the key areas in Suffolk as the Suffolk Coast and Heaths and Brecklands.  Key sites in Suffolk are at:

Northfield Wood

Tangham (Nr Woodbridge)

Bradfield Woods (Nr Bury)

Other sites include Barking Tye (Nr Needham Market) and Wolves Wood (Nr Hadleigh)

Local Plan needs to be aware of the content of this Action Plan and the need to avoid damage to these sites.

SA needs to include biodiversity issues.


Suffolk Biodiversity Action Plan, 2012


Aim is to provide clarity for planners by collating all the information on the county's Biodiversity Action Plans (BAPs) in one place and rationalising all the relevant actions contained within previous BAPs.

Objectives:

  1. To ensure lawful compliance towards biodiversity in planning decisions.
  2. To promote best practice and provide support to planners on biodiversity issues.
  3. To ensure the planning system contributes to the Natural Environment White Paper 2011 objective of no net loss of biodiversity as part of sustainable development.

Action Plan Targets:

  1. Ensure development avoids adverse impacts on biodiversity.
  2. Where avoidance is not possible, mitigate residual impacts of developments.
  3. Where mitigation is not possible, compensate for losses incurred during development.
  4. Enhance developments for biodiversity.
  5. Ensure biodiversity is taken into consideration during, and after, the construction phase of development.

Local Plan policies need to consider biodiversity and ensure that no adverse impacts occur.

SA should include objectives in relation to biodiversity.


State of Nature – Lowlands – future landscapes for wildlife (2004)


This report describes the state of nature in lowland England, and examines how a variety of pressures impact upon habitats and species.  It identifies conservation successes achieved through positive action, and stresses the importance of working in partnership.  It demonstrates that a landscape-scale approach to nature conservation is essential, but can only be delivered by involving people more actively, through integrating policies more effectively, and through successful partnership at regional and local levels.  It illustrates how the approach described in the England Biodiversity Strategy of delivering wildlife gains through working in partnership across sectors, can be put into action.



The ten most critical actions required to deliver environmentally sustainable management in the English lowlands:

  1. Invest in better environmental management and wildlife recovery on farms
  2. Stimulate appropriate management of farmland and woodland
  3. Improve water management
  4. Restore wetland habitats
  5. Reduce the threats and impacts from non-native invasive species
  6. Reduce the cumulative impacts of development
  7. Reduce the adverse effects of transport
  8. Reduce atmospheric pollution
  9. Adapt to the impacts of climate change
  10. Improve management of the impacts of access and recreation

Local Plan needs to develop policies within this context of objectives.

SA Framework to include objectives relating to local landscapes, biodiversity and geodiversity as well as issues relating to climate change.


Suffolk Local Geodiversity Action Plan, 2006




The Suffolk Local Geodiversity Action Plan provides an audit of the different types of geology found throughout the County, together with its condition and any actions that are needed to preserve and improve it.  

The aims of the geodiversity action plan are as follows:

  1. Carry out a geodiversity audit for Suffolk
  2. Carry out geodiversity conservation and management
  3. Promote geodiversity in policy and practice
  4. Promote geodiversity awareness
  5. Sustain the local geodiversity action plan process

Local plan policies will need to take account of the findings of the Suffolk Local Geodiversity Action Plan

SA Framework to include objectives relating to geodiversity.


In Step With Suffolk: Rights of Way Improvement Plan 2006-16


This document provides and overview of the condition of rights of way in the County, together with a summary of the policy and legislative context within which they operate.

Action points are centred around the following key objectives:

  1. Provide a better signed, maintained and accessible network
  2. Provide and protect a more continuous network that provides for the needs of all users
  3. Develop a safer network
  4. Increase community involvement in improving and managing the network
  5. Provide an up to date and publicly available digitised definitive map for the whole of Suffolk
  6. Improve promotion, understanding  and use of the network.

Local Plan policies should consider public rights of way across the district.

SA Framework to include objectives in relation to public rights of way.


Suffolk Coast and Heaths AONB Management Strategy (June 2013-18)



This document provides an overview of the landscape and habitats of the AONB and provides a review of the implementation of the previous plan. It then sets out a series of objectives that relate to the protection, management and improvement of the AONB.

Investigate the need for policies for the AONB area to support the vision for each theme and how targets can be achieved through those policies.

SA Framework to include objectives relating to landscape and townscapes and enhancing the environment where possible.


Suffolk Coasts and Heaths Management Plan 2013-18


The Suffolk Coasts and Heaths Management Plan 2013-18 provides an overview of the Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, together with management aspirations. The document starts with detailed descriptions of different parts of the AONB, including the environmental and economic issues that they face. The document provides guidance about plan making and planning decisions in the area and emphasises the need to protect the character and landscape of the AONB. The latter part of the document presents a vision for how the AONB will look in 2033 together with management proposals for the AONB area. This is broken down into a list of objectives, together with an action plan detailing how these will be achieved.




The Local Plan needs to take account of the unique character and landscape of the AONB and to preserve the natural environment. In particular it needs to take account of the aims and objectives of the AONB management plan.

SA Framework to include objectives relating to landscape and townscapes and enhancing the environment where possible.


Keepers of Time – A Statement of Policy for England's Ancient & Native Woodlands: Action Plan 2005-7 (Forestry Commission)


The aim is to achieve the outcomes below by 2020


Protection of the Resource

i) Existing area of ancient woodland maintained

ii) Net increase in area of other native woodland

iii) No significant or unnecessary losses of known veteran trees

Local Plans should seek to address these issues

Objectives and Indicators on conserving and protecting the landscapes through protection of ancient and protection/expansion of native woodlands should be included


Quality of Life

i) Increase in the number of people visiting woodlands for leisure purposes

ii) Increase in the proportion of the population with access to woodland near to where they live

Local Plans should seek to address these issues

Could be linked in with other indicators on health, recreation and access to green spaces


Ecological condition

i) All widespread and serious threats to ancient and native woodland being reduced

ii) The majority of ancient semi-natural woodland either in favourable condition or being improved

Local Plans should seek to address these issues

Objectives and Indicators on conserving and protecting the landscapes through protection of ancient and protection/expansion of native woodlands should be included


Cultural heritage

i) Local communities increasingly aware of the heritage and environmental value of ancient and native woodland

Not really an issue for Local Plans

Could be linked in with other indicators on health, recreation and access to green spaces


East Suffolk Local Investment Plan 2010-2015, 2010


The East Suffolk Local Investment Plan identifies the key themes and issues that relate to regeneration and housing in East Suffolk (Suffolk Coastal and Waveney districts). It provides a framework for deciding where financial resources should be deployed and where intervention from the Homes and Communities Agency might be needed. 


Touching the Tide Landscape Character Assessment August 2012 (Suffolk County Council Landscape Character Assessment)


This landscape character assessment for the Touching the Tide (TtT) Partnership was carried out during 2012. It covers an area defined by Suffolk Heritage Coast but extends inland along the Deben Estuary as far as Melton and south to the Landguard Peninsular at Felixstowe. It therefore includes coastal landscapes and three distinct estuaries - the Blyth, the Alde-Ore and the Deben and the majority of the area falls within the wider Suffolk Coast and Heaths Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).




The purpose of the landscape character assessment is to provide an understanding of the variety of landscape within the area and to record what is special and distinctive in order to inform and provide a framework for future Partnership work, as well as to inform wider AONB work including the review of the Management Plan.

SA Framework to include objectives relating to conserving and enhancing local landscapes and local distinctiveness.


Deben Estuary Plan, 2015


Estuary Plan prepared by the Deben Estuary Partnership to "safeguard the Deben Estuary from degredation….so that future generations may continue to benefit

The plan addresses the principle issue of flood risk management for the Deben Estuary but also takes a more inclusive stance, reflecting the preferred Local Plan Strategy for an integrated approach to the coastal zone.  The people who live in, work by or visit the Deben Estuary place great importance on:

  • The integrity of defence structures and flood risk management which lessens the risk of flooding and offers sustainable protection.
  • The distinctive quality of the estuary landscape, set apart from urban influence; the perceived tranquillity and inherent sense of peace.
  • The special qualities of the environment affording enriched and bio diverse land and saltwater habitats
  • The contribution the estuary area makes to the local economy through agriculture, tourism and marine business.
  • The opportunities for recreation supporting health and providing pleasure.

Local Plan policies need to be developed in accordance with the aims and objectives of the Deben Estuary Plan to ensure that a integrated policy approach to the river and coastal zone is developed.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to the natural environment and unique landscape of the River Deben.


Alde and Ore Estuary Plan, 2016


A partnership set up by the community for the community to protect homes, businesses and our environment from flooding.

The Alde and Ore Estuary Plan seeks to achieve:

  • Parishes affected by estuary flooding.
  • Manage the estuary and its river defences as a whole taking account of the changes affecting flood cells and changes from climate change and isostatic rebalancing.
  • Where defences require upgrading, upgrade these to withstand overtopping.  The approach would allow for overtopping from time to time but with very quick recovery.
  • Sets priorities for upgrading or changing defences over a ten year period.
  • Regular monitoring the state of the estuary.
  • Seeks to secure the necessary funds through enabling development where appropriate.

Local Plan policies need to be developed in accordance with the aims and objectives of the Alde and Ore Estuary Plan to ensure that a integrated policy approach to the river and coastal zone is developed.

The SA Framework should include objectives relating to the natural environment and unique landscape of the Rivers Alde and Ore.


Dementia-friendly Health and Social Care Environments, 2015


Supporting people who are living with dementia is one of the biggest challenges that the health and social care system will face in the 21st century.

Outlines the growing need to provide dementia friendly environments and care facilities.  Identifies a series of principals to help designs to be more supportive environments for people living with dementia through consideration of sensory, cognitive and physical impairments.

Local Plan policies should include the provision of dementia friendly environments using the principles to meet the predicated rising dementia prevalence through innovative solutions.

SA Framework should include objectives in relation to social care and high quality environments.


Haven Gateway Water Cycle Study, November 2009


Based primarily on data valid at the end of 2008

The conclusions of the report have adopted a precautionary principle in that they have been based on no future action, and therefore highlight that action is needed, irrespective of whether this action is already planned, or needs to be planned before development takes place.

The intention of the report is to encourage and focus dialogue between the development partners to ensure that the various components of the water cycle are considered by all. It is expected that some local authorities or individual developers may need to take the water cycle studies into additional detail and develop strategies for implementing any actions required prior to, during and after development to ensure the longer term security of the water cycle.

The Local Plan must acknowledge the importance of the water cycle and the impact development has on it.

The SA should include objectives that support all components of the water cycle in relation to development.


Hidden Needs in Suffolk, 2016 {Five years On (2011-2016)}


The new report incorporates data from the 2015 Index of Multiple Deprivation, the 2011 Census and a range of other data, including information from the new Social Mobility Index published in 2016.

Growth of Suffolk's population is slowing down compared to the rest of the East of England and the UK.

The population is also growing progressively older: The proportion of younger people is declining and the proportion of pensioners increasing.

This has long term implications: older people have greater demand of public services, and the relative proportion of people in employment to those in retirement will impact on Suffolk's overall economy.

As the first Hidden Needs reported, county and district level statistics can obscure levels of deprivation in rural areas.

Over

14 per cent of neighbourhoods in Ipswich and 12 per cent in Waveney are ranked among the most deprived 10 per cent in England.

In 2016, the government introduced a new Social Mobility Index designed to estimate how a disadvantaged background affects a person's life chances at school and thereafter in the

workplace.

The index suggests that there is marked inequality of opportunity for children and young people across Suffolk .

Ipswich, Waveney, Babergh and Forest Heath are placed in the least socially mobile 20 per cent of districts in England.

Mid Suffolk is placed among the most socially mobile 20 per cent.

The Local Plan must understand the key demographics of the districts and seek to implement the right strategies in dealing with the increasingly aging population and importantly make provision for the poorest in our society so they can change their economic and social situations.

The SA should include objectives that support the needs of the whole of our society, especially the most vulnerable groups.


Strategic Housing Market Assessment, 2017



The IHMA SHMA sets out the Objectively Assessed Need for the entire IHMA, and also splits the need for the individual districts. The report sets out the following objectives and outputs:

  • To test and confirm the housing market geography.
  • To produce conclusion on objectively assessed housing need.

The report comments on the affordable housing need, but not in great detail, as is not required to. It is useful to know that affordable need I Ipswich will be a greater proportion of their OAN than in Suffolk Coastal due to their respective demographics and social characteristics.

The Local Plan must aim to meet the OAN for housing while also meeting the need for affordable housing.

The SA should include objectives the support the need to meet the OAN and affordable housing need.


State of Children in Suffolk Report 2016



This report assesses the health band wellbeing of young people and children in Suffolk. Suffolk overall performance better than the National and regional averages, and performance and outcomes are generally improving.

However, things can always be better and there are areas that are of concern. For example Suffolk has seen a rise in overweight or obese children both in absolute terms and relative to the national benchmarks. This may be due to the low levels of physical activity experienced in children in Suffolk.

Concerning is the fact that children from deprived areas, in care, or in need, or with special educational needs perform much worse than other children. Worryingly, this trend gets worse as children progress through education.

The Local Plan must support children and young people, and seek to improve the problem areas of high obesity levels, low physical activity, and low levels of education especially in the most vulnerable children.

The SA objectives should support children in education, especially the most vulnerable children, as well as promote healthy lifestyles, (eating healthily and getting involved physical activity).


Rural deprivation in Suffolk May 2016



The report finds that in general the rural areas within Suffolk are less deprived than urban areas. The rural population is:

  • More likely to live longer.
  • Less likely to be income deprived.
  • Less Likely to be a child living in an income deprived household.
  • Less likely to be workless.
  • More likely to hold higher levels of qualifications.

The costs of providing services In rural areas is estimated to be considerably higher than in urban areas.

Suffolk's rural population is aging faster than its urban population. This along with limited transport connectivity in rural areas, may result in increasing the cost of living in rural areas compared to urban areas.

The Local Plan must seek to diminish where possible the inequalities between rural and urban areas.

The SA should include objectives that reduce rural-urban inequalities and seek to support the social, economic, and environmental needs of the rural population, and not at the expense of the urban population.


The East of England Climate Change Adaptation Network 2014


Local authorities need to assess their risk during extreme

weather events

Changes in Population growth

• Changes in demographics (increase in older people)

• Built environment (impacts on draining both in urban areas

and in rural areas, flood plains)

• Increase demand for travel both for business or domestic

reasons

• Increased expectations of immediate access to resources,

goods and services (e.g. reliance on a continuous provision of

energy).

The Local Plan must acknowledge the need to develop adaptations to deal with climate change.

The SA should include objectives that support the need to adapt to climate change, and mitigate any negative consequences of climate change.


East Suffolk Catchment Flood Management Plan (Dec 2009)



This report helps the Environment Agency to understand the scale and extent of flooding now and in the future, and set policies for managing flood risk within the catchment.

The report can be used by a number of key stakeholders to plan for future management of areas affected by future flooding.

The Local Plan must acknowledge the importance of flooding, especially so in this coastal setting. The Local Plan must also plan for extreme flooding events, emergency planning.

The SA should include objectives that promote flood management strategies, reducing the risk of flooding in vulnerable areas.


A summary of Climate Change Risks for the East of England (2012)



Key findings of this report show that action is required to prepare for the future impacts of climate change:

  • Increase in the frequency and severity of flooding.
  • Hotter summers, potentially leading to an increase in premature deaths.
  • Reductions in water availability could lead to water shortages.

The report suggests adaptation action will be needed to increase water efficiency across all sectors and decrease levels of water abstraction in the summer months.

The Local Plan will need to acknowledge the threat posed by climate change, particularly on water availability and the affects on older people in extreme temperatures.

The SA should include objectives that support the need for adaptation strategies in dealing with climate change, ore specifically water availability.


The Stour & Orwell Estuaries Scheme of Management 2010



The report seeks to promote the sustainable use of the Stour and Orwell estuaries through the management of human activity, in a way which is compatible with the conservation of the estuarine landscape and wildlife.

The hinterland grazing and salt marshes provide habitat for over-wintering geese, ducks, wading birds, and fish attracted y vast numbers of invertebrates living in the mudflats.

The estuaries have a very significant economic role as the location for nationally important ports which, together with marinas, fisheries and other industries, provide jobs to surrounding communities.

The estuaries are vulnerable to the potential impact of climate change, including possible sea level rise.

The Local Plan must acknowledge the importance of the Stour and Orwell estuaries for economic development while at the same time protecting the important natural environment.

The SA should include objectives that support the natural environment of the estuaries while also providing economic opportunities.


Essex and South Suffolk Shoreline Management Plan (Oct 2010) (Environment Agency)



The SMP sets a long term plan for the coastal section that the plan covers.

The SMP aims to identify the best ways to manage flood and erosion risk to people and to the developed, historic and natural environment. The SMP also identifies other opportunities where the management can work with others to make improvements.

The Local Plan should take into account the flood and erosional risks to the coastline and plan to reduce the risk of flooding and erosional processes upon the coast.

The SA should include objectives that reduce flooding, and erosion upon the coast, especially land most vulnerable to these processes.


Suffolk Heritage Strategy (2014)



This Suffolk wide heritage strategy developed with the help of many different stakeholders has the following key aims:

  • Identify and have an understanding of the nature of Suffolk's heritage assets.
  • Raise awareness of Suffolk's heritage and issues surrounding its management.
  • Promote positive action and support initiatives that secure the future and ensure the preservation and enhancement of Suffolk's heritage assets.
  • Actively promote the role and opportunities presented by conservation and heritage in terms of wider regeneration and economic development of the country and develop a framework for investment.
  • Promote best practice with regard to stewardship, advice, education, policy and project implementation at a local, regional and international level.

The Local Plan must acknowledge the importance of preserving and enhancing the heritage assets within Suffolk, while also promoting economic opportunities.

The SA should include objectives that support and promote the protection of the heritage assets within Suffolk.


Suffolk Nature Strategy (2015)



This report aims to promote and protect the beautiful Suffolk countryside, which offers many benefits to those that experience it. Over 36% of the county is either nationally or locally protected for its wildlife or landscape value.

It is important that Suffolk's natural environment is conserved and enhanced for future generations and continues to be seen as one of the county's key strengths.

The Local Plan must acknowledge the challenges and opportunities our natural environment faces, while also planning for the opportunities the natural environment provides for economic growth as well as the benefits in health and wellbeing.

The SA should include objectives that plan positively for the natural environment and make the most of the economic and social opportunities presented by the natural environment.


Haven Gateway – Ipswich A14 Corridor Study (July 2007)



This report aims highlight the current and future transport related issues in the region as well as suitable measures and interventions to address the transport related problems.

The expected growth of the Haven sub region has led to modelled estimates that the A14 corridor at Ipswich will reach maximum capacity by 2012 and that air quality and public transport journey times will suffer.

The Local Plan must acknowledge the need for sustainable transport solution to capacity issues.

The SA should include objectives that promote sustainable travel and support infrastructure improvements that alleviate congestion and hence air pollution levels.


Update of the Haven Gateway Green Infrastructure Strategy for the Ipswich Policy Area; Babergh District Council, Ipswich Borough Council, Mid-Suffolk District Council and Suffolk Coastal District Council; August 2015



This report identifies the provision and deficiencies of accessible natural greenspace across Suffolk. The report provides an up to date framework for implementing the local plan policies of the four authorities and for mitigating the effects of new development on protected habitats.

The Local Plan must acknowledge the importance of natural greenspace in providing social, environmental, and economic benefits to residents.

The SA should include objectives that support the need for natural greenspace that is accessible for all.


New Anglia Skills Manifesto



The overall aims of the programme is to provide local people with high quality locally produced food and help small businesses grow, offering them the chance to build the skills, experience and confidence needed to operate in a busy and competitive marketplace.

The Local Plan must acknowledge the need to aid small businesses to develop their service to remain active and reduce business deaths.

The SA should include objectives that support businesses, and especially small businesses to develop.


Building our Industrial Strategy Green Paper 2017



This report aims to improve living standards and economic growth by increasing productivity and driving growth across the whole country.

This report draws on lessons learnt by other countries and identifies some of the key approaches that have enabled stronger activity and more balanced growth in other economies.

The report presents 10 pillars for industrial growth:

  • Investing in science, research and innovation.
  • Developing skills.
  • Upgrading infrastructure.
  • Supporting businesses to start and grow.
  • Improving procurement.
  • Encouraging trade and inward investment.
  • Delivering affordable energy and clean growth.
  • Cultivating world-leading sectors.
  • Driving growth across the whole country.
  • Creating the right institutions to bring together sectors and places.

The Local Plan must acknowledge the importance of creating the right environment for different industries to thrive across the whole plan area.

The SA should include objectives that support economic growth across a rang of sectors and locations.


UK Digital Strategy 2017



The report sets out the need to fully embrace the digital economy, in order to seek the benefits. The report sets out 7 key pillars:

  • Connectivity – building world class digital infrastructure for the UK.
  • Digital skills and inclusion – giving everyone access to the digital skills they need.
  • The digital sectors – making the UK the best place to start and grow a digital business.
  • The wider economy – helping every British business become a digital business.
  • A safe and secure cyberspace – making the UK the safest place in the world to live and work online.
  • Digital government – maintaining the UK government as a world leader in serving its citizens online.
  • Data – unlocking the power of data in the UK economy and improving public confidence in its use.

The Local Plan must acknowledge the importance of the digital economy and its clear future importance, and plan for a future where the digital economy is at the forefront.

The SA should include objectives that promote the need for greater support for the digital economy.







SUFFOLK COUNTY COUNCIL DOCUMENTS


Suffolk Bus Strategy, 2006


Ensuring accessibility

The county council will ensure a minimum level of accessibility is provided across the county to ensure social mobility and encourage travel by sustainable transport. The rural network will comprise inter-urban services (high and low frequency), feeder services and market day services, together with 'dial-a-ride' operations. Minimum service levels for settlements of less than 5,000 are related to population size (these are listed in Appendix A).

Local Plans need to take account of service levels when looking at future development strategies, and allocation of housing and employment land in villages.

SA should include objectives in relation to public transport.


Suffolk's Local Transport Plan, 2011-2031


The plan is in two parts. The first part is a 20-year strategy that highlights the county council's long-term ambitions for the transport network, while the second part is a shorter-term, four year, implementation plan.

The plan envisages the implementation of the following strategic transport projects:

• dualling of the A11 between Barton Mills and Thetford

• the Ipswich major scheme, 'Ipswich- Transport fit for the 21st Century'

• the Beccles rail loop allowing increased frequency of trains between Ipswich and Lowestoft

• the Beccles southern relief road

• the Lowestoft northern spine road to help remove through traffic from the town

• Ipswich rail chord to improve freight connections from Felixstowe

• Copdock A14/A12 junction improvements.

The strategy differs for urban and rural areas.

Urban:

1. reducing the demand for car travel

2. more efficient use and better management of the transport network

3. where affordable - infrastructure improvements, particularly for sustainable transport.

Rural:

1 Better accessibility to employment, education and services.

2 Encouraging planning policies to reduce the need to travel

3 Maintaining the transport network and improving its connectivity, resilience and reliability

4 Reducing the impact of transport on communities

5 Support the county council's ambition of improving broadband access throughout Suffolk.

Local plan policies should be broadly in line with the local transport plan.

Transport is an important element of site sustainability. The local plan should help inform site selection as this will have a knock-on effect on the environmental, social and economic factors. 


Suffolk Cycle Strategy, 2014


Vision is to increase the number of people cycling in Suffolk, firmly establishing it as a normal form of transport for everyone. 

Aims include the following:  to encourage cycling across all sectors of the community, supporting Suffolk's 'Most Active County' ambitions; to promote a transfer to cycling (and walking) for short distance trips, supporting Suffolk's 'Creating the Greenest County' ambitions; to promote the benefits of cycling for health and for subsequent savings in the health budget; to foster enthusiasm for cycling in young people; to plan and design for the future with cycling in mind; to create a safe and cycle friendly environment.

Indicators

More regular cyclists in Suffolk across all members of population;  more use of integrated sustainable transport; Achieve community wide support for cycling across Suffolk; More cycle journeys made especially for short distances; reduced car travel in towns; reduced congestion; improved air quality; improved healthy lifestyles across the community; improved physical/mental health; reduced levels of obesity; reduce number of people living with preventable health issues; reduce the costs to the public health budget; more children cycling; reduced post 16 years of age drop off in cycling; reduced street clutter; provision of cycling crossing points; provision of cycle paths; creation of local facilities within cycle range; removal of perceived and actual fears related to cycling; improved usability of cycle routes; improved relationship between all modes of travel on the highway.

Sustainable development is a fundamental part of the local plan, therefore the integration of cycling into the local plan should be considered.

Cycling is an important element of site sustainability. This should be taken into account in the SA framework.


Suffolk's Nature Strategy, 2015


Suffolk's Nature Strategy seeks to protect and enhance the County's natural environment. It also provides a series of recommendations and actions to help protect the environment, including that local plans protect and enhance areas of high environmental and wildlife value.

Key recommendations include encouraging biodiversity offsetting, ensuring that neighbourhood and parish plans take into account areas of biodiversity and wildlife value, as well as biodiversity offsetting to ensure that any biodiversity value lost to development is replaced.

Local Plan policies should take into account the natural environment and ensure it is conserved and enhanced for future generations and continues to be seen as one of the county's strengths.

SA Framework includes objectives relating to landscape, biodiversity and geodiversity.


Suffolk Walking Strategy 2015-2020


Strategy to promote walking and encourage more people to walk more and see the health benefits of being more physically active.

Aims of the Strategy:

  • Walking is seen as beneficial, easy, inclusive, accessible, pleasant and safe;
  • Walking is the "default" choice for journeys of 20 minutes walking time or less.

More people walking more often will improve the physical and mental health of the people of Suffolk and make a significant contribution towards Suffolk's ambition of being the most active county in England.

Local Plans need to provide locations and places which encourage walking in an easy, inclusive, accessible, pleasant and safe environment.  Essential that planning policies are informed by Public Health organisations which can promote walking to all.

SA Framework to include objectives in respect of walking and increasing physical activity to develop healthy communities.


Suffolk Poverty Strategy: Working together to tackle poverty 2015-2020


Strategy sims to build on what is already in place to address poverty so that it is embedded in the planning and delivery of all services for the most vulnerable groups.  Strategy also aims to raise awareness of poverty in the county and the great work that is already taking place.

Identifies five strategic aims:

  1. Extend financial inclusion and improve people's financial skills,
  2. Reduce levels of food and fuel poverty,
  3. Reduce levels of child poverty,
  4. Improve people's skills and employment prospects,
  5. Reduce health inequalities.

Local Plan policies should seek to create communities which are inclusive and accessible to all through range of housing type and tenures, range of employment opportunities and mix of appropriate community facilities and infrastructure to support the most vulnerable groups.

SA Framework to consider objectives relating to social inclusion, employment opportunities and appropriate housing options.


Transforming Suffolk Community Strategy 2008-2028 (2008 revision)


Aim is to improve quality of life in Suffolk for its people and communities.

Document focuses on the future looking forward to the next 20 years and is based around four themes.

A Prosperous and Vibrant Economy:

Learning and skills for the future:

Creating the Greenest County

Safe, Healthy, Inclusive Communities

To become the most innovative and diverse economy in the East of England:

Transport and infrastructure to support sustainable growth

Learning and skills levels in the top quartile in the country

County with greatest reduction in carbon emissions;

Reducing carbon footprint;

Adapting to climate change and geography;

Retain and maintain natural and historic environments

Pursue healthy lifestyles, safety, and sense of community belonging

The four key themes should be considered when preparing planning policies.

SA Framework to consider objectives in relation to the objectives of the Suffolk Community Strategy.


Suffolk Health and Wellbeing Strategy Refreshed for 2016 to 2019


Suffolk's joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy sets the long term strategy for improving health and wellbeing in Suffolk to 2022. 

Vision is for "People in Suffolk to live healthier, happier lives."  Health and wellbeing covers everything about someone's life and includes physical, mental and social wellbeing.  The Strategy seeks to address health inequalities and improves healthy life expectancy.  The Strategy refresh has identified new themes:

  • Stronger communities,
  • Embedding prevention,
  • Addressing inequalities,
  • Health and Care integration.

Local Plan policies should seek to deliver sustainable and health communities which support individuals physical, mental and social wellbeing.

The SA should include objectives relating to health and wellbeing.


Joint Municipal Waste Management Strategy for Suffolk – Oct 2003 (updated 2008)


1.4.3

Suffolk's Local authorities will work together and in partnership with others to develop a Municipal Waste Management Strategy. The Strategy will seek to minimise levels of waste generated and to manage waste in ways that are environmentally, economically and socially sustainable.  The Strategy will seek to influence the wider waste stream, providing waste minimisation and recycling in industry and contribute towards the preparation of a Waste Local Plan for Suffolk. In delivering the strategy, LAs will embrace the principles outlined in the National Waste Strategy and aim to recycle or compost at least 60% of municipal waste.

Need to be aware of objectives and targets and facilitate them through Local Plan policies.

Ensure that key policies on waste management are reflected in the SA framework.


1.7.4. Targets

Final statutory performance standards for the percentage of household waste recycled and composted, for 2005/06 are:

BDC:  21%

FHDC:  40%

IBC:  18%

MSDC:  24%

SEBC:  40%

SCDC:  36%

WDC:  18%

SCC:  36%

Need to be aware of objectives and targets and facilitate them through Local Plan policies.

SA to include objectives in relation to increasing recycling.


1.7.9. Targets

National Waste Strategy targets for limiting landfill (not automatically adopted locally) are to reduce the amount of biodegradable municipal waste going to landfill to 75% of biodegradable municipal waste produced in 1995 by July 2010 (reducing to 50% by 2013, and 35% by 2020)

Need to be aware of objectives and targets and facilitate them through Local Plan policies.

SA to include objectives in relation to waste management.


2.2. Waste reduction and re-use

Policy 4 - We will promote and encourage waste reduction wherever possible to minimise the amount of waste that is produced.

Policy 5 - We will promote and encourage waste re-use wherever possible, by supporting community schemes and promoting awareness, and encouraging the re-use of waste collected through the Household Waste and Recycling Centres and bulky waste collections.

Need to be aware of objectives and targets and facilitate them through Local Plan policies.

Ensure that key policies on waste management are reflected in the SA framework.


2.3. Recycling and composting

Policy 6 - We will seek to maximise the proportion of waste that is recycled or composted, aiming to achieve at least 60% by 2010.

Policy 7 - We will seek to introduce 'three-stream' collection systems from the kerbside of at least 80% of households in Suffolk by 2010.

Systems will vary across the county to take account of circumstances and views. Different approaches to kerbside recycling and waste collection will be developed in remote rural areas and densely populated urban areas.

Policy 8 - We will investigate the possibility of introducing kerbside collection of glass.

Policy 11 - We will increase the number of bring sites for the collection of glass throughout the county. The number of bring sites and range of materials they collect will be increased in areas where it is not planned to introduce separate kerbside collection of dry recyclables.

Policy 12 - We will work to optimise the number and location of Household Waste and Recycling Centres, and enhance quality of service provision. We will increase the quantity and range of materials recycled, aiming to recycle 55% of waste taken to the sites by 2004/05. 

Need to be aware of objectives and targets and facilitate them through Local Plan policies.

Ensure that key policies on waste management are reflected in the SA framework.


2.4. Disposal

Policy 14 - We will seek to minimise the amount of waste landfilled by maximising reduction, re-use, recycling and composting, and in the longer term by introducing non-landfill residual waste treatment facilities. Where waste is landfilled we will seek to minimise environmental impacts by requiring best practise at sites, landfilling waste near to where it is generated and maximising recovery of energy from landfilled waste. We will aim to landfill less then the level of our landfill allowances each year until at least 2012.

Need to be aware of objectives and targets and facilitate them through Local Plan policies.

Ensure that key policies on waste management are reflected in the SA framework.


Suffolk Rights of Way Improvement Plan 2006-2016


This document provides an assessment of the condition of public rights of way throughout the county, the types of use they receive and improvements and repairs that area likely to be needed.

The rights of way assessment identified 6 objectives for future action.

Objective A: Provide a better signed, maintained and

accessible network

Objective B: Provide and protect a more continuous network that

provides for the requirements of all users

Objective C: Develop a safer network

Objective D: Increase community involvement in improving

and managing the network

Objective E: Provide an up to date and publicly available digitised

Definitive Map for the whole of Suffolk

Objective F: Improve promotion, understanding and use

of the network.

The Local Plan will need to protect public rights of way.

SA Framework to include objectives relating to landscape and townscapes and enhancing the environment where possible.


Suffolk Joint Municipal Waste Strategy 2003-2020 2013 Addendum


The revisions listed below to the Joint Municipal Waste Strategy ensure that it remains compliant with relevant Government guidance.


Policy Statements (p1)

The document contains a number of policy statements on how the authority will manage its waste stream in pursuance of the above.

Local Plan policies to consider waste management.

SA to include objectives in relation to waste management.


Suffolk Minerals Core Strategy, 2008


The Minerals Core Strategy establishes the framework for all other Mineral Local Plans (Local Plans), which must conform to its principles. It is intended to cover up to the end of 2021. It should be read in conjunction with the Suffolk Minerals Site Specific Allocations document.



The core strategy aims to meet the supply of aggregates in a sustainable manner, ensuring appropriately located sand and gravel quarries are identified within a broad belt which follows the A14 from the east of Ipswich to the western extremity of the county. Restored sites will contribute towards the enhancement of Suffolk's biodiversity action plan species and habitats and landscape character.

Any sites identified with the local plan area should also be shown on the local plan policies map.

SA Framework should include objectives relating to biodiversity.


Suffolk Waste Core Strategy, 2011


This document contains the waste planning policy for Suffolk. Proposals are made for sites suitable for the development of Strategic Residual Waste Treatment Facilities and Non Hazardous Landfill.



Planning applications for other types of waste development are intended to be determined in accordance with the policies contained within this document and that of other relevant documents. The strategy aims by 2027 to eliminate the landfilling of untreated municipal, commercial and industrial wastes and have fully operational residual waste management processes, recovering value from wastes that cannot practically be recycled or composted.

Any sites identified with the local plan area should also be shown on the local plan policies map.

SA Framework to include objectives relating to reduction of waste


Suffolk Minerals Site Specific Allocations, 2009


The Minerals Specific Site Allocation Local Plan identifies on maps twelve sites for sand and gravel extraction and will meet the identified need for sand and gravel until 2021.In line with the Minerals Core Strategy ten of the sites are extensions to existing quarries. The two new sites previously appeared in Suffolk Minerals Local Plan 1999 which the Site Allocations document replaces. The sites identified are: Waldringfield (two areas); Coddenham; Layham; Barham; Chilton (new site);  Timworth (new site); Homersfield/Flixton (two areas); Worlington/Red Lodge (two areas); and Cavenham. Three sites, shown as M1, W6 and W7 on the proposals maps are located within Suffolk Coastal and a further two sites, P5 and P6 are located within Waveney.




Any sites identified with the local plan area should also be shown on the local plan policies map.

The SA should include objectives in relation to minerals and waste policies.


Suffolk Waste Site Specific Allocations, 2011


This document contains the waste planning policy for Suffolk. Proposals are made for sites suitable for the development of Strategic Residual Waste Treatment Facilities and Non Hazardous Landfill. Planning applications for other types of waste development are intended to be determined in accordance with the policies contained within this document and that of other relevant documents.



The strategy aims by 2027 to eliminate the landfilling of untreated municipal, commercial and industrial wastes and have fully operational residual waste management processes, recovering value from wastes that cannot practically be recycled or composted.

Any sites identified with the local plan area should also be shown on the local plan policies map.

The SA should include objectives in relation to minerals and waste policies.


Suffolk Minerals and Waste Local Plan, Issues and Options Consultation Document, 2016


Suffolk County Council are producing a single document to cover both minerals and waste policy

Consultation seeks views on proposed policies for the development of minerals and waste.  Includes proposed aims and objectives and detailed policies for minerals and waste development in the county, and draft criteria for new minerals and waste sites.  Next stage of consultation expected summer 2017, with further consultation and submission to the Planning Inspectorate for examination and adoption in 2018.

Local Plan documents need to take account of minerals and waste policies and ensure that there is no conflict between land use planning and the minerals and waste planning functions.

The SA should include objectives in relation to minerals and waste policies.


Suffolk's Local Economic Assessment 2011



Suffolk's Community Strategy (2008) identified the economy as one of four key priorities for improvement in Suffolk.  Learning and skills were also identified as a high proportion of people with poor literacy and numeracy skills were a significant issue.  In order for Suffolk to have a prosperous and vibrant economy, skills for both young people and the working age population have to be addressed.

Eight key economic sectors for Suffolk have been identified for detailed research to be undertaken, these are:

• Advanced Manufacturing,

• Biotechnology,

• Creative Industries,

• Energy,

• Food, drink and agriculture,

• Information and communication technology,

• Ports and logistics

• Tourism.

Local Plans should include objectives and policies to facilitate successful economic growth across the district.

The SA should include objectives relating to sustainable levels of prosperity and economic growth.


Suffolk Historic Landscape Characterisation Map 2008



The Map characterised the historic landscape of Suffolk through the identification and mapping of a range of defined Historic Landscape Types, each based on current land use and an assessment of its historical origin.

Development Pan Documents should be sympathetic to the historic environment and landscapes across the district.

The SA should include objectives relating to the conservation and enhancement of historic and archaeological areas and landscapes.


Suffolk Local Authorities – Air Quality Management and New Development 2011



Guidance helps to ensure a consistent approach to planning and dealing with air quality across Suffolk.  Air quality is a material planning consideration with the potential to affect and influence planning processes for both proposed developments within designated Air Quality Management Areas. Aims of the guidance are:

  • Maintain and where possible improve air quality,
  • Ensure a consistent approach to local air quality by:
    • Identifying circumstances where an air quality assessment would be required to accompany an application,
    • Providing guidance on the requirements of the air quality assessment,

Providing guidance on mitigation and offsetting of impacts.

Local Plans should take into account Air Quality issues as well as the impact the traffic has on the environment.  Where appropriate the production of Air Quality Assessments should be provided as part of future planning applications.

The SA should include objectives relating to the quality of air quality and improving the environment for all communities.


Education and Learning Infrastructure Plan - Suffolk County Council



Suffolk Coastal is not predicted to grow through natural population at the same levels as the rest of Suffolk. However, planned developments on the periphery of the large towns will create a need for additional primary places in areas where the schools are at capacity. Smaller rural developments will also require expansion of some of our rural primary schools.

Ipswich continues to be the district in Suffolk with the largest population due to a large number of births over deaths and substantial moves from elsewhere in the country. Ipswich has the highest basic need growth in the county and a large scale development planned in the north of the town.

The Local Plan must plan for the future educational needs of the district, allowing for increased capacity where necessary and building new schools also.

The SA should include objectives that support the growth in the educational sector especially in schools that are at or close to capacity.


Suffolk County Council's 'Better Broadband for Suffolk'



This is a programme designed to bring better broadband to all of Suffolk. The programme is building a brand new superfast broadband network. This will have the potential to transform the life, work and play of each and every one of the half a million people living and working in Suffolk.

Superfast broadband will boost the economy of Suffolk, enabling businesses to work more effectively in new ways and potentially reach out to new customers worldwide.

The Local Plan must acknowledge the need for fast broadband for business and social life, especially in the rural areas of the county.

The SA should include objectives that support the need for fast broadband in enabling the rural economy, as well as in urban areas.


NEIGHBOURING LOCAL AUTHORITY DOCUMENTS


Babergh District Council Local Plan Core Strategy and Policies 2011-2031, Feb 2014


This document provides a strategic plan for Babergh for 2011-2031. It outlines the strategy steering growth. The main environmental, economic and social issues that the plan needs to address are identified.

Growth is to be jobs-led, rather than homes-led. The plan aims to create 9,700 new jobs through protecting and allocating sites and premises, promoting a mix of retail and leisure growth in the town centres, planning for the strategic sites and broad location of growth identified to include employment land, and encouraging growth in new and locally important job sectors such as renewable energy and tourism. Port related growth, particularly at Felixstowe, will also be a very important sector. The level of new homes to plan for is 300 per year.

Economic recovery is to be promoted, some of which is needed for Ipswich Borough (which is tightly constrained by its boundaries). To ensure that growth there is balanced and sustainable, it needs to fall within its larger neighbouring districts including Babergh and Suffolk Coastal districts. This reflects the duty upon these local authorities to co-operate in planning ahead for the future.

A total of 2,500 additional new homes are planned in Babergh for the 20 year period, to be distributed as follows:

• 850 dwellings at Sudbury / Great Cornard, (split between an extra 350 in the vicinity of the already allocated Chilton Woods development and a further 500 to be brought forward to the immediate east of the town, at a new location and phased later on)

• 250 dwellings at Hadleigh (to the town's east)

• 350 dwellings in the Babergh Ipswich Fringe (to the west of the existing urban area in

Sproughton parish) and

• 1,050 dwellings to allow for appropriate levels of growth in the Core and Hinterland Villages

• The Brantham Regeneration Project is likely to result in some new homes coming forward (toward the end of the plan period), but as this complex project is at a very early stage the total of new homes planned for Babergh does not rely on an allocation of housing numbers at Brantham.

The Local Plan will need to take into account the strategic vision and policies for Babergh to accord with the Duty to Co-operate.

SA to include objectives which consider cross boundary issues and relationships.


Mid Suffolk District Council Core Strategy, 2008 (Focused Review 2012)


This document is Mid Suffolk District Council key strategic planning document.

It defines a spatial vision for Mid Suffolk District to 2025; sets out a number of objectives to achieve the vision; sets out a spatial development strategy to meet these objectives; sets out strategic  policies to guide and control the overall scale, type and location of new development; sets out the broad location of new housing and employment land necessary; and sets out a monitoring and implementation framework. A focussed review was undertaken in 2012, which made various amendments to the core strategy.

The Local Plan will need to take into account the strategic vision and policies for Mid Suffolk to accord with the Duty to Co-operate.

SA to include objectives which consider cross boundary issues and relationships.


Babergh and Mid Suffolk Joint Local Plan Document, 2015


An initial Issues and Options consultation document covering Core Strategy, Development Management Policies and Strategic Sites

A new document that will in due course replace the 2006 Babergh Local Plan and the 1998 Mid Suffolk Local Plan.  It will set out a policy framework and where appropriate identify strategic sites for housing, employment and infrastructure, as well as detailing Development Management Policies to assist in the management and delivery of development proposals.  The timetable for production of the Joint Local Plan for Babergh and Mid Suffolk is currently being reviewed.

The Local Plan will need to take into account the strategic vision and policies for Babergh Mid Suffolk to accord with the Duty to Co-operate

SA to include objectives which consider cross boundary issues and relationships.


Ipswich Local Plan Core Strategy and Policies, 2017



This document sets out a strategic vision and objectives to guide the development of the town, promotes the spatial strategy for the development of the town until 2031 through strategic policies and provides a suite of policies to control, manage and guide development across the Borough.

The Local Plan will need to take into account the strategic vision and policies for Ipswich to accord with the Duty to Co-operate.

SA to include objectives which consider cross boundary issues and relationships.


Ipswich Local Plan Site Allocations and Policies, 2017



This document identifies a wide range of sites across the whole Borough, which should be allocated for development or afforded a degree of protection from development.  It also sets policies for town centre uses and also provides guidelines for six development areas within IP-One.

The Local Plan will need to take into account the strategic vision and policies for Ipswich to accord with the Duty to Co-operate.

SA to include objectives which consider cross boundary issues and relationships.


Waveney District Council, Issues and Options Document, 2016


Issues and Options Consultation document aimed at getting view on the levels of growth needed across Waveney up to 2036.

Document covers a variety of key planning issues across the district in respect of social, economic and environmental aspects.

Local Plan policies will need to take account of policies emerging in neighbouring local authorities.

The SA will need to ensure the objectives are broadly in accordance with those being considered in neighbouring authorities.


Waveney and Suffolk Coastal Joint Environmental Policy, 2012


The Joint Environmental Policy sets down how the two Councils will tackle the challenges of climate change, environmental protection and population increases through the management of their property estates. This includes council offices, council housing and other council-owned property.



Where the Councils have the authority to do so, they will require that new development with a value of greater than £1 million will be required to meet BREEAM excellent standards. If this is not possible a very good standard will be required provided this has been agreed by the relevant cabinet member.

Local plan policies that relate to Council owned land or property should have regard to the requirements of the joint environmental policy.

SA to include objectives which consider cross boundary issues and relationships.


Mid Suffolk Strategic Flood risk assessment, March 2008


The Mid Suffolk Strategic Flood Risk Assessment provides an overview of rivers, lakes and water bodies within the District and looks at the flood risk posed by each of these. Implications for future development and planning are assessed, and the study provides recommendations to help tackle flood risk in the future. While it is unlikely that any of these findings will pertain directly to Waveney or Suffolk Coastal some of the rivers that are mentioned, such as the Deben, also flow through Suffolk Coastal. Therefore plan making within Suffolk Coastal and to a lesser extent Waveney (which borders Mid Suffolk to the northwest) should take account of this study.  


Suffolk Coastal and Waveney Strategic Flood risk assessment, Feb 2008


The Suffolk Coastal and Waveney SFRA provides a detailed description of flood risk in the two districts

This includes a description of sources of fluvial flooding, as well as the different mechanisms for controlling and preventing flooding that are employed in the two districts. There is also an assessment of the different mechanisms for flooding in the two districts, as well as identifying parts of the districts that are most vulnerable to flooding.

Planning policies should be informed by the findings of the SFRA and policies should seek to direct development to areas of no or minimal flood risk wherever possible.

SA Framework to include objectives relating to water management and flood risk.


Babergh Strategic Flood Risk Assessment, March 2009


The Babergh SFRA provides a detailed description of flood risk in the District.

This includes a description of sources of fluvial flooding, as well as the different mechanisms for controlling and preventing flooding that are employed in the District. There is also an assessment of the different mechanisms for flooding in the two District, as well as identifying parts of the District that are most vulnerable to flooding.

Planning policies should be informed by the findings of the SFRA and policies should seek to direct development to areas of no or minimal flood risk wherever possible.

SA Framework to include objectives relating to water management and flood risk.


Ipswich Strategic Flood risk assessment, May 2011


The Ipswich SFRA provides a detailed description of flood risk in the Borough.

This includes a description of sources of fluvial flooding, as well as the different mechanisms for controlling and preventing flooding that are employed in the Borough. There is also an assessment of the different mechanisms for flooding in the Borough, as well as identifying parts of the Borough that are most vulnerable to flooding and the level of risk posed by different sources of flooding.

Planning policies should be informed by the findings of the SFRA and policies should seek to direct development to areas of no or minimal flood risk wherever possible.

SA Framework to include objectives relating to water management and flood risk.


Suffolk Local Flood Risk Management Strategy, February 2013


This document aims to increase participation in flood risk prevention by all stakeholders, including local government, residents, developers, government organisations and community groups. As a result it doesn't identify areas of risk in any detail or propose solutions. Rather it defines responsibilities for tackling flood risk, such as ensuring local drains are kept clear, and encourages cooperation among different stakeholders. A key aspiration is to improve the way in which flood risk is managed and reduced and the document encourages different organisations to actively work together. The final part of the document provides guidance about flooding emergencies, together with a list of contact numbers.   


Ipswich Borough Council Air Quality Action Plan, 2008.



There are three AQMAs within Ipswich. These are:

  • Chevallier Street and Norwich Road junction.
  • Crown Street, St Margaret's Street and Fonnereau Road Junctions.
  • Star Lane gyratory system/St Helen's Street near the Wet Dock.

These AQMAs are defined as having exceeded the annual average air quality objective for Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2).

The Local Plan must acknowledge the AQMAs within the district and seek solutions to improve the air quality across the district, but especially in the AQMAs.

The SA should include objectives that relate to air quality and carefully manage the AQMAs located in the district.


Ipswich Borough Council Cycling Strategy Supplementary Planning Document



This report sets out how businesses should promote and facilitate cycling from the outset of planning a development. It also sets out IBC's vision for cycling in Ipswich and identifies strategic cycling routes which the council would wish to see enhanced.

The Local Plan must acknowledge the importance of cycling through providing environmental, economic, and social benefits to all.

The SA should include objectives that support cycling and cycle route provision at the early stages of development.


Ipswich and Waveney Economic Areas - Employment Land Needs Assessment - Final Report, March 2016



The report assesses the economic development needs for the Ipswich Economic Area and Waveney Economic Area. The study considers future land and floor space requirements alongside related qualitative factors for individual sectors and employment uses.

The key findings were as follows:

  • Key employment sectors include Public admin, health and education, retail and wholesale, professional and business services.
  • Business growth has lagged behind regional and national averages in recent years and the majority of businesses are small firms employing between 0 and 4 workers. Employment space is dominated by business uses (B1c/B2/B8).
  • The port of Felixstowe has a very important economic influence on the district from an industrial perspective.
  • The Ipswich Economic Area is considered a as a good industrial location.

The Local Plan must acknowledge the importance of economic conditions for economic development to take place and be successful.

The SA should include policies that support investment in economic development throughout the Ipswich Economic Area.















Table 48: Key objectives, targets and indicators relevant to plan and SA


Appendix II: Template for completing initial SA assessments

SA Objective

Effect

Timescale

Permanence

Comments

Population

1. To reduce poverty and social exclusion





Housing

2. To meet the housing requirements of the whole community





Health and Wellbeing

3. To improve the health of the population overall and reduce health inequalities





4. To improve the quality of where people live and work





Education

5. To improve levels of education and skills in the population overall





Water

6. To conserve and enhance water quality and resources





Air

7. To maintain and where possible improve air quality





Material Assets (including Soil)

8. To conserve and enhance soil and mineral resources





9. To promote the sustainable management of waste





Climate Change

10. To reduce emissions of greenhouse gases from energy consumption





11. To reduce vulnerability to climatic events and flooding





The Coast and Estuaries

12. To safeguard the integrity of the coast and estuaries





13. To conserve and enhance biodiversity and geodiversity





Cultural Heritage

14. To conserve and where appropriate enhance areas and assets of historical and archaeological importance





15. To conserve and enhance the quality and local distinctiveness of landscapes and townscapes





16. To achieve sustainable levels of prosperity and growth throughout the plan area





17. To maintain and enhance the vitality and viability of town and retail centres





18. To encourage efficient patterns of movement, promote sustainable travel of transport and ensure good access to services.





Digital Infrastructure

19. To ensure that the digital infrastructure available meets the needs of current and future generations





Scoring

++

Significant positive effect


-

minor negative effect

+

minor positive effect


--

Significant negative effect

0

neutral effect


?

Uncertain effect

Table 49: Template for completing initial SA assessments

Effect

9.6 When assessing sites and policies it is important to identify whether effects are significant or not.  The regulations dictate the following considerations: 

(a) the probability, duration, frequency and reversibility of the effects;

(b) the cumulative nature of the effects;

  (c) the transboundary nature of the effects;

(d) the risks to human health or the environment (for example, due to accidents);

(e) the magnitude and spatial extent of the effects (geographical area and size of the

population likely to be affected);

(f) the value and vulnerability of the area likely to be affected due to-

(i) special natural characteristics or cultural heritage;

(ii) exceeded environmental quality standards or limit values; or

(iii) intensive land-use; and

(g) the effects on areas or landscapes which have a recognised national, Community or international protection status.

9.7 It is also important to consider uncertainty, and the likelihood of an effect occurring. 

Permanence and timescale of the effect

9.8 For all effects identified it should be considered if the effect is permanent or temporary.  For example a renewable energy proposal may only have temporary effects on the landscape if it is to be decommissioned after 20 years.  The timescale of effect should also be considered, for example short term (5 years from adoption), medium term (10 years from adoption) or long term (beyond 20 years from adoption).

Comments

9.9 It is important to keep a record of the reasoning for determining a particular effect on an objective. 

If you are having trouble using the system, please try our help guide.
back to top back to top