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Strategic Environmental Assessment and Sustainability Appraisal - Site Allocations and Policies (incorporating IP-One Area Action Plan) DPD

Ended on the 5th March 2015
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(1) 4. APPRAISAL OF THE SITE ALLOCATIONS DPD

4.1 Introduction

4.1.1 This section outlines the results of the appraisal of the Site Allocations DPD including details of mitigation measures that could be implemented to improve the performance of the plan.

4.2 Appraisal of Vision and Objectives

4.2.1 The Core Strategy vision and objectives provide the context for the Site Allocations plan.

4.2.2 A key theme of the vision is to promote and enhance sustainable transport within Ipswich. Due to the constrained nature of the borough and the presence of four AQMAs this is a key issue. However, the vision, seeks to implement traffic management measures in conjunction with improvements for pedestrians, cyclists and buses which will ensure effective links between Ipswich, the wider area, the town centre and contribute to keeping congestion down. All of which would benefit the SA Objectives related to air quality (ET1), climate change (ET6) and traffic movements (ET4).

4.2.3 With regards to the natural environment the vision seeks to ensure the Borough’s network of beautiful parks, open spaces, green infrastructure and open water is enhanced by new development along with ensuring the historic character of the Borough is conserved and enhanced. This would particularly benefit SA Objectives ET8 ‘To conserve and enhance biodiversity and geodiversity, including favourable conditions on SSSIs, SPAs and SACs’ and ET9 ‘To conserve and enhance the historic environment, heritage assets and their settings’.

4.2.4 There is an emphasis placed upon the need to create a place ‘where people aspire to live, work, learn, visit and invest’ which would positively fulfil the social SA Objectives, as creating such a place would include improving housing, community and tourist facilities, employment opportunities, educational provision and would facilitate general regeneration.

4.2.5 The economic SA Objectives would be met through the vision’s commitment to providing a concentration of accessible job opportunities within the town centre along with ensuring opportunities are created elsewhere i.e. Futura Park. Providing employment opportunities along with housing provision would seek to promote sustainable economic growth.

4.2.6 The Core Strategy contains 12 Strategic Objectives to deliver the vision:

  1. High standards of design will be required in new development. Development must be sustainable, environmentally friendly and resilient to the effects of climate change. Standards of acceptability will be raised progressively from 2006 (Building Regulations) levels for all developments in the town in terms of design and environmental performance.

  2. Every development should contribute to the aim of reducing Ipswich's carbon emissions below 2004 levels.

  3. At least: (a) 13,550 new dwellings shall be provided to meet the needs of Ipswich within the Housing Market Area between 2011 and 2031 in a manner that addresses identified local housing needs and provides a decent home for everyone, with at least 35% at the Ipswich Garden Suburb and 15% in the remainder of the Borough being affordable homes; and (b) in the region of 12,500 additional jobs shall be provided in Ipswich to support growth in the Ipswich Policy Area between 2011 and 2031

  4. The development of the Borough should be focused primarily within the central Ipswich ‘IP-One’ area, Ipswich Garden Suburb and within and adjacent to identified district centres.

  5. Opportunities shall be provided to improve strategic facilities in Ipswich by:

    • Significantly enhancing the town centre in terms of quantity and quality of the shops, the cultural offer and the network of public spaces;

    • Ensuring a new strategic employment site at Futura Park continues to be developed;

    • Extending the strategic greenspace, ecological network and canopy cover; and

    • Continuing to support the development of University Campus Suffolk and Suffolk New College.

  6. To improve accessibility to and the convenience of all forms of transport, and achieve significant modal shift from the car to more sustainable modes through Travel Ipswich and other local initiatives. This will: (a) promote choice and better health; (b) facilitate sustainable growth, development and regeneration; (c) improve integration, accessibility and connectivity; and (d) promote green infrastructure as alternative ‘green’ non-vehicular access around the town and urban greening of existing routes. Specifically:

    • Significant improvements should take place to the accessibility to and between the three key nodes of: the railway station (including the wider Ipswich Village environment), the Waterfront (and particularly the Education Quarter) and the Central Shopping Area;

    • Additional east-west highway capacity could be provided within the plan period in the Ipswich area to meet the needs of the wider population and to provide the potential to reallocate some central road space;

    • Comprehensive cycle routes should be provided; and

    • Ipswich Borough Council aspires to an enhanced public transport system.

  7. Enhanced flood protection including a tidal surge barrier to be in place to protect the town's existing and expanding communities from the threat of tidal flooding.

  8. To protect and enhance high quality, accessible strategic and local open spaces rich in biodiversity and geodiversity for people to visit and use, and conserve and enhance the historic environment and landscape character of Ipswich, including historic buildings, archaeology and townscape.

  9. To retain and provide high quality schools, health facilities, sports and cultural facilities and other key elements of community infrastructure in locations accessible by sustainable means and in time to meet the demands put on such services from the town's growth and ageing population.

  10. To tackle deprivation and inequalities across the town.

  11. To improve air quality and create a safer, greener, more cohesive town.

  12. To work with other local authorities in the Ipswich Policy Area and with community partners to ensure a co-ordinated approach to planning and development.

4.2.7 Each of the Core Strategy Strategic Objectives were assessed against the SA Objectives in a compatibility matrix to determine their compatibility and to identify any potential areas where new Strategic Objectives need to be established or the existing ones clarified.

4.2.8 On the whole the Strategic Objectives and the SA Objectives complement each other, with many positive correlations and five potential incompatibilities recorded. The link between three Strategic Objectives and three SA Objectives was recorded as uncertain.

4.2.9 All five potential incompatibilities were related to Strategic Objective 3, which deals with the development of new housing and new employment sites. Concerns were related to traffic, air quality, waste, energy consumption and biodiversity. These issues however, are partially mitigated by the all-encompassing Strategic Objective 1, as it is taken that a commitment to sustainable and environmentally friendly development will aim to reduce traffic or limit its growth, reduce waste levels and increase recycling and reduce energy consumption (through low carbon or carbon-neutral developments with increased efficiency and/or use of renewable energy or CHP schemes) along with protecting biodiversity resources.

4.2.10 The three uncertainties were associated with Strategic Objective 6, transport. These are all related to traffic and increased movements (and its effects i.e. poor air quality). This is because the Strategic Objective supports both improvements to sustainable transport and an increase in road capacity. This issue is mitigated to some extent by clearly stating support for improving public transport and cycling and walking facilities.

(2) 4.3 Appraisal of Site Allocation Policies

4.3.1 Policies SP1 to SP9 propose development at a number of sites allocated for housing, employment, open space, leisure uses/community facilities, park extension, and transport infrastructure. The potential effects from the implementation of each policy have been assessed through the assessments of the site allocations and the conclusions of these are also relevant to these policies.

4.3.2 The more detailed assessment of the site allocations is provided in Appendix F. Sustainability comments related to the policies as such and a summary of the site allocations assessment findings are presented in the section below grouped in tables depending on the proposed site use, e.g. housing, employment, etc.

Policy SP1 The protection of allocated sites

This policy safeguards the uses of allocated sites. The Council provides a commitment that it will only permit alternative uses on allocated sites if compatible with plan objectives and that the site is no longer needed or viable. This commitment would ensure that the assessments of the allocations would still be valid. However, if alternative uses are proposed, these may not address the SA objectives as the original allocation.

Policy SP2 Land Allocated for Housing and

Policy SP3 Land with planning permission or awaiting a Section 106

Policy SP2 and SP3 provide detailed allocations for housing. These include sites allocated for residential development or part residential development within mixed use developments and Sites with Planning Permission or Awaiting a Section 106 Agreement. The implementation of the policies will contribute to the achievement of SA objective ER 3 To help meet the housing requirements for the whole community. Indirect benefits are identified with regard to improved quality of life and mental health and well-being through the provision of decent housing (HW1 and HW2). Depending on the location of the sites, some benefits are recorded with regard to remediation of contaminated land. Mixed scores are recorded against air quality, traffic, and climate change (depending on the location of the site and the size of the development area including density and indicative capacity).The detailed assessment matrices of site allocations are presented in Appendix F and a summary table is set out below.

Policy SP4 Land protected for Gypsy and Traveller sites

Sites currently used by gypsies and travellers are identified on the policies map and are protected for that use. The policy seeks to ensure that housing needs (SA Objective ER3) for this social group are adequately met throughout the plan period through protection of existing sites. However, no new sites are currently allocated therefore it is considered that the policy would not contribute to any significant change from the baseline conditions with regard to the rest of the SA objectives. It is unknown at this stage where a potential site for a permanent pitch would be allocated, therefore it is considered that the overall effect from the implementation of the current policy is uncertain at this stage. Sites for additional Gypsy and Traveller pitches will be assessed against the criteria included in policy CS11 of the Core Strategy. Detailed assessment of the policy against the SA objectives is included in Appendix E.

Policy SP5 Land allocated for employment use

Policy SP5 provides detailed allocation for employment. On the whole, the sites will contribute directly to economic and employment objectives (ER1, ER2, ER4, and ER7). Indirect positive effects are likely to occur with regard to the overall quality of life and mental health (HW1 and HW2). Mixed scores are recorded against the environmental objectives as the potential impacts are largely related to the location of the site, its size and proximity to designated sites or flood risk zones. The assessment of each site allocation is presented in Appendix F and the summary table below.

Policy SP6 Land allocated and protected as open space

The policy seeks to ensure that land is allocated for open space particularly within new development. The provision of open space would have direct health benefits. It would also contribute to the quality of life of the residents and air quality. Some indirect benefits include opportunities for social inclusion and community participation. There are also opportunities for enhancement, which should benefit biodiversity. The assessments of sites are set out in Appendix F and below.

Policy SP7: Land allocated for leisure uses or community facilities

The policy seeks to ensure adequate provision of community facilities to reflect the population growth (e.g. primary schools, health centres, etc.). As a result, the implementation of the policy will broadly achieve objectives related to health, education, community participation and the overall improvement of the quality of life. Land is also allocated for leisure uses, which would address social and economic objectives. Assessments of sites are set out in Appendix F and below.

Policy SP8: Orwell Country Park Extension

Land is allocated as an extension to Orwell Country Park, to provide better management to this part of the Orwell Estuary Special Protection Area. The Council will also investigate further the feasibility of including a visitor centre facility within the site, including any potential impacts on the Special Protection Area. The potential effects from the implementation of the policy have been assessed through the assessment of site allocation IP149 and the conclusions of this are also relevant to SP8. Assessment of IP149 is set out in Appendix F and below.

Policy SP9 Safeguarding land on development sites for transport infrastructure

This policy safeguards land for transport infrastructure and improvements within certain development sites. Potential benefits are identified with regard to air quality, traffic and climate change through the provision of pedestrian and cycle connections at IP010, IP059a, and IP037. These improvements will also help to achieve SA objectives related to health, efficient patterns of movement, community participation and the overall improvement of the quality of life. Detailed assessment of the policy against the SA objectives is included in Appendix E.

Policy SP2 Land Allocated for Housing

Site Allocation Location Significant Findings
IP010a: Co-op Depot, Felixstowe Road
IP010b: Felixstowe Road
IP066 JJ Wilson, White Elm Street
South East The sites would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. The site allocations largely scored positively against the SA Objectives. IP010a, IP010b and IP066 would be developed on previously developed land though the potential for contaminated land has been identified. Proposed development at IP010a, IP010b and IP066 would support SA Objective ET5 (access), ER5 (vital town centres) and ER7 (inward investment) as they are in close proximity to existing District Centre 23 which would improve access to key services in the long term whilst encouraging investment and supporting the viability and vitality of the District Centre. Negative scores were recorded against ET1 (air quality) and ET3 (waste) as the provision of housing would result in an influx of people and private vehicles which would negatively affect air quality and would result in more waste being produced.
IP066 is located within an AQMA and additional traffic could contribute to increasing emissions and increasing their effects on the environment (ET1 and ET4). Development at IP010a, IP010b and IP066 would support SA Objective ET6, ‘To limit and adapt to climate change’ by replacing existing buildings and land with modern techniques including insulation and heating methods which would replace existing inefficient practices with modern standards.
Development at each of the sites would also support SA Objective HW1 (health), HW2 (quality of life) as it would improve the quality of housing stock and would contribute towards increasing the quality of life for residents.
IP059a: Elton Park Industrial Estate
IP061 School Site, Lavenham Road
South West The sites would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. Mixed scores recorded for IP059aand IP061 against the SA Objectives. The increase of people and cars in the long term would have negative effects on air quality and the environment due to vehicular emissions and would increase waste production (ET1, ET3, ET4 and ET6). The proposed development is on brownfield land. The sites would support SA Objective HW1 (health), HW2 (quality of life) and ER1 (poverty) as they would improve the quality of housing stock and would contribute towards increasing the quality of life for residents. The improvement of housing stock within the area would aid economic regeneration which would raise living standards and help to minimise anti-social activity (CD1).
IP245:12-12a Arcade Street
IP040 and IP041: Civic Centre Area / Civic Drive
IP One Area Central The sites are located in urban Ipswich and would be developed on brownfield land; remediation of this land would benefit the soil resources and support SA Objective ET2. Due to the location of the sites in the central urban area, access to facilities and shopping areas would be improved which would benefit SA Objective ET5. The site scored positively against HW1 (health) as the provision of homes close to community facilities would encourage walking/cycling.
Due to the location of IP040, in the central urban area of Ipswich access to facilities and shopping areas would be improved which would benefit SA Objective ET5 (access). The site scored positively against HW1 (health) as the provision of homes close to community facilities would encourage walking/cycling. IP040 would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. The site scored positively and negatively for ET9 ‘‘To conserve and enhance the historic environment, heritage assets and their settings’ as it is located in an Area of Archaeological importance and near a Conservation Area.
IP172: 15-19 St Margaret’s Green
IP214: 300 Old Foundry Road
IP One Area Central The sites would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. Each of the sites scored positively and negatively for ET9 ‘‘To conserve and enhance the historic environment, heritage assets and their settings’ as the site is located in an Area of Archaeological importance and near a Conservation Area. The sites are to be developed on previously developed land and there is the potential to encounter contaminated land. However, remediation would help improve soil resources. The sites scored positively against SA Objective ET4, ‘To reduce the effects of traffic upon the environment’ as the sites are located in close proximity to the primary and secondary shopping areas and this may reduce the need to travel by private car.
The sites are not located in a flood risk area and there may be benefits for water if there are opportunities to remediate some historical areas of contamination.
Site IP172 and IP214 scored positively against SA Objectives HW1 (health), HW2 (quality of life), and ER6 (efficient patterns of movement) as the provision of quality housing close to Christchurch Park and close to land allocated for community and leisure use could help to encourage healthier lifestyles, efficient patterns of movement and community participation.
IP048: Mint Quarter / Cox Lane IP One Area
Central
The site would support the viability and vitality of centres due to the central location and it would directly support SA Objective ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet community requirements. IP048scored negatively against SA Objective ET1 (air quality) as it is located close to an AQMA due to the potential increase in traffic from car use. In addition, there are potential negative effects associated with dust air and pollution during construction. IP048 also scored negatively against ET3 (waste) and ET8 (biodiversity) as it is likely to result in increased waste generation due to housing provision and the site has TPOs which may be affected by development. The site scored negatively against ET9 (heritage assets) and ET10 (local distinctiveness) as it is located in a Conservation Area and in an Area of Archaeological Importance.
Positive scores were recorded against ET4 (traffic), ER1 (poverty) and ET5 (access) as the central location of the site may encourage sustainable travel due to close proximity to key services and facilities which may also help to reduce social exclusion.
IP054: Land between Old Cattle Market and Star Lane
IP011b: Smart Street, Foundation Street
The sites would support the viability and vitality of centres due to the central location and it would directly support SA Objective ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet community requirements. IP054 and part of IP011b scored negatively against SA Objective ET1 (air quality) as it is located close to an AQMA due to the potential increase in traffic from car use. IP011b and IP054 both scored negatively against ET3 (waste) as they would increase waste generated and cumulatively, negative effects against this SA Objective are expected with other developments in the IP One Area. IP054 is located within a Conservation Area. There are also listed buildings that could be affected by development at these sites and each of the sites is located within an Area of Archaeological Importance.
Positive scores were recorded against ET4 (traffic), ER1 (poverty) and ET5 (access) as the central location of the site may encourage sustainable travel due to close proximity to key services and facilities which may also help to reduce social exclusion.
IP136: Silo College Street IP One Area
Central
The site would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. The area along Star Lane, College Street, and Bridge Street is designated as AQMA and as a result of an increase in residents cumulatively in the immediate area and potential increase in traffic a negative score is recorded against ET1 and ET4. The site is located in Flood Zones 2 and 3 with a risk of flooding from the river Orwell. Positive scores are recorded with regards to health (HW1), quality of life (HW2), poverty and social exclusion (ER1), and vital town centres (ER5).
IP089: Waterworks Street
IP012: Peter’s Ice Cream
IP043: Commercial Buildings and Jewish Burial Ground, Star Lane
IP One Area
Central
The sites would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. Each of these sites is located close to an AQMA and the cumulative increase of people could generate traffic in the vicinity of Fore Street, Star Lane and Grimwade Street which would detract from SA Objective ET1 (air quality).
The sites are on brownfield land and remediation measures of contaminated land (where appropriate) would help to improve soil resources (ET2). IP043 scored negatively against ET3 (waste) as the indicative capacity suggested a significant increase in waste if appropriate mitigation measures are not enforced. Listed buildings were found near to IP089 and IP043 (both in Conservation Areas) and each site is located within an Area of Archaeological Importance. The sites scored positively against ER6 (efficient patterns of movement) as the provision of housing close to existing/ future employment and shopping areas would encourage efficient patterns of movement and in the long term this could help to support economic growth.
The sites also benefit SA Objective CL1 ‘To maintain and improve access to education and skills for both young people and adults’ as the sites could contribute to improving access to the University Campus Suffolk.
IP037 Island Site IP One Area
Central
The site scored positively against ER3 ‘To help meet the housing requirements for the whole community’ as it seeks to provide 271 homes however all of these dwellings are anticipated to be flats which may result in an oversupply of this type of housing in central Ipswich. The provision of this many homes would also increase private cars which would have a negative effect on air quality and climate change (ET1, ET4). The site would be developed on previously developed land and remediation measures would help to improve the soil resources (ET2). Waste production is likely to increase and due to the size of new development this is likely to be fairly significant. The site scored negatively against SA Objective CD1 ‘To minimise potential opportunities for crime and anti-social behaviour’. It is ranked in an area less deprived than those adjacent to it and in the short term may lead to an increase in crime levels. Although the site is located in central urban area, constraints have been identified with the potential increase in residents relating to the need to provide vehicular/pedestrian/cycle access via a new bridge. The site is located in flood zone 2 and 3, is surrounded by a designated county wildlife site and is close to an SPA south of the river Orwell therefore potential negative effects are associated with deterioration of air quality, water quality and disturbance to protected species. However, it should be noted that an Appropriate Assessment under the Habitats Regulations has been carried out to consider any potential impacts of the plan on the SPA, which does not identify potential impacts on the SPA from the Island Site redevelopment but potential harm to the SPA arises from dog walking on the foreshore by the SPA which disturbs birds. Therefore there may be increased potential impact from increased population and dog walking.
IP098: Transco, south of Patteson Road
IP142: Land at Duke Street
IP One Area
Central
The sites would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. The sites are located close to an AQMA and as a result of an increase in residents cumulatively in the immediate area; traffic may be generated in the vicinity of Duke Street, A1156 and Fore Street. The sites would benefit ET2 (soil resources) as they are on previously developed land which is likely to be contaminated and through remediation the soil resources could be improved. The relatively central location of the sites could help to encourage more sustainable modes of transport in some cases and could help to improve access to key services (ET4). The sites could indirectly benefit health and quality of life (HW1 and HW2) as they are close to Holywells and Alexandra Park which could help to support healthier lifestyles for residents. Potential positive effects are associated with improving access to education as the University Campus Suffolk is located close to the sites (CL1).
IP188: Websters Saleyard site, Dock Street
IP039a: land between Gower Street and Gt Whip Street
IP133: South of Felaw Street
IP080: 240 Wherstead Road
IP One Area
South West
The sites would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. IP188 and IP039a are located near an AQMA designated due to air pollution along Vernon Street and Bridge Street. Currently the sites are located near existing employment areas to the southeast which may result in reduced need to travel by private car. However, the increase of new residents may cause congestion and deteriorate air pollution to the north of the sites in the vicinity of Bridge Street, Star Lane and Commercial Road. (ET1). IP188 and IP039a are located close to key facilities such as schools, public transport, shops and parks and therefore offer benefits for SA Objective ET4 and ET5. IP188, IP133 and IP039a located in flood zones 2 and 3 and are prone to flooding from the river Orwell. IP080 is adjacent to flood zone 2 and 3. IP188 and IP039a are adjacent to listed buildings and IP188 falls entirely within a Conservation Area. IP133 is adjacent to a Conservation Area and development has the potential to affect the settings of historic/conservation sites
The provision of housing close to existing employment areas and a range of community facilities could help to encourage efficient patterns of movement and would help to support the vitality and viability of town centres supporting SA Objectives ER5 and ER6.
IP133 scored positively and negatively against SA Objective ET1 (air quality). The site is located a significant distance from any AQMAs however it is likely that residents from this development will contribute to increased traffic generated northbound in order to access shopping areas. The site scored negatively against SA Objective ET5 as potential access constraints exist and they are associated with negative effects on the local highway network at junction A137.
IP031: Burrell Road The site is located near an AQMA designated due to air pollution along Vernon Street and Bridge Street. It is considered likely that residents from the new housing dwellings at IP031 could generate additional traffic eastbound along Burrell road to access shopping areas and community services in the town centre area via Bridge Street. However, the number of dwellings does not suggest a significant change from the baseline and the score against ET1 is neutral.
IP031 is located in Flood Zones 2 or 3 being prone to flooding from the river Orwell. Part of IP031 falls within an Area of Archaeological Importance and adjacent to a Conservation Area in its most eastern parts. There are no Scheduled Monuments within or adjacent to the sites.
Positive indirect effects are likely to occur with regards to the proximity of the site to Gippeswyk Park located to the west of the site allocation. The site is also near designated river paths and close to community facilities which may encourage residents to lead a healthy lifestyle.
IP083: Banks of the river upriver from Princess Street
IP015: West End Road Surface Car Park
IP One
South West
The sites would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. Due to the number of proposed homes, it is not considered that effects against air quality would be significant for these sites. The sites scored positively against SA Objective ET2 (soil resources) as they would be developed on brownfield land. Any remediation, if required, would serve to improve the soil resource. The sites scored positively against ET5 (access), and HW2 (quality of life) are located close to key facilities and would improve access to services whilst promoting healthy lifestyles and contributing to improving community participation. IP015 scored negatively against ET6 (climate change) as it is located within flood zone 2 and 3 and is at risk of flooding from the river Orwell. It also scored negatively against ET9 (heritage assets) as it is located close to a listed building and may have potential effects against its setting.
IP004: Bus depot Sir Alf Ramsey Way
IP096: Car park Hanford Road East
IP006: Coop Warehouse, Pauls Road
IP One
South West
The sites would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. IP004 and IP096 scored positively against SA Objective ET1 (air quality) as the area is served by public transport which may reduce the need for private car use. There are also a number of employment sites in close proximity to the site allocations which may encourage the implementation of car share schemes as well as encouraging more sustainable travel modes which would also help to support SA Objective ET4 (traffic). As each of the sites is located in central Ipswich, close to shopping areas, access to key services will be improved supporting SA Objective ET5. IP004 is located within flood zones 2 and 3 and is at risk of flooding from the river Orwell. IP096 is also located in an area prone to flooding. IP006 scored negatively against HW1 (health) as a result of the location close to railway lines which may have potential noise disturbance. Each of the sites scored positively against SA Objectives HW2 (quality of life) and ER5 (vital town centres) as the location of each site (close to shops, facilities and services) will help to encourage community participation whilst supporting town centre vitality and viability.
IP032: King George V Field, Old Norwich Road
IP005: Former Tooks Bakery, Old Norwich Road,
Ipswich
North West
The sites would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. The sites scored negatively against SA Objectives ET1 (air quality), ET3 (waste) and ET7 (water quality). The developments seek to provide housing and would cumulatively result in increased cars and people which would make a negative contribution to local air quality although this would be minor. Waste production and water use would increase as a result of more people.
Positive scores were recorded against HW1 (health), HW2 (quality of life), and ER1 (poverty) as the sites will help to support health due to being located close to existing playing fields which will also help to encourage community participation and reduce social exclusion. The provision of homes many help to minimise opportunities for antisocial behaviour through secured by design measures.
IP221 Flying Horse PH
IP029: Land opposite 674-734 Bramford Rd
IP165: Eastway Business Park, Europa Way
IP033: Land at Bramford Rd (Stock Sites)
Ipswich
North West
The sites would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. The sites scored negatively against ET1 (apart from IP221 which is small in size and effects will be negligible) as the sites seek to provide homes which would cumulatively increase the number of people and vehicles within the local area which could negatively affect air quality. The provision of homes with IP165, which is close to the A14 could increase traffic on A14 (and cumulatively with sites in the local area) however it is anticipated that the overall effect would be minor. The sites scored positively against ET5 (access) as each would contribute to improving access to key services. IP029, IP165 and IP033 currently contain vegetation or TPOs which could be affected by development. The sites could each contribute to enhancing local distinctiveness through careful design.
IP131: 488-496 Woodbridge Road / Milton Street Ipswich
North East
IP131 seeks to provide 13 new homes and is unlikely to have a significant effect on air quality due to the small scale of proposed development (ET1). The site is located close to a District Centre, two Local Centres and areas of open space. This may encourage sustainable travel locally (ET4 and ET5). Development of the site could contribute towards enhancing quality and local distinctiveness through modern design and the replacement of existing structures (ET10).
The site is located close to protected playing fields which could make partial contributions towards improving health in the long term through encouraging people to go outdoors and promoting healthier lifestyles.
High quality housing would also help to support the SA Objectives HW1 and HW2.
IP116 St Clements Hospital Grounds Ipswich
North East
The site would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. The provision of 227 homes at IP116 would see a localised population increase. This may result in increased car use and subsequent increase in vehicle emissions, however it is located on at least two bus routes, close to Derby Road station and approximately 2km from work opportunities in the town centre and at Ransomes Europark.
A positive score is recorded against ET5 (access) due to its proximity to a local centre and facilities. The site is located close to a District Centre and two Local Centres therefore access to these sites would be improved though on a minor scale. High quality housing provision would help to support quality of life and reduce social exclusion (HW1, HW2 and ER1). The use of secured by design measures would help to reduce opportunities for crime and anti-social behaviour. Due to the housing capacity, an increase in waste is considered likely and therefore scores negatively against SA Objective ET3 ‘To reduce waste’.
IP009: Victoria Nurseries, Westerfield Road
IP256: Artificial Hockey pitch, Ipswich Sports club subject to the requirements of policy DM28 being met
Ipswich
Central
The sites would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. The sites seek to provide small scale housing development which would have a minor negative effect on local air quality and traffic. IP256 is adjacent to the Northern Fringe Allocation so that there may be cumulative effects on traffic. There is one bus route in close proximity to the sites which could help to reduce negative effects on traffic. These sites would be developed on brownfield sites and remediation of land would help to improve the soil resources. There may be a drainage constraint at IP256 due to its previous use as a hockey pitch. Each of these proposed developments are located close to a large area of open space which could make contributions towards improving health in the long term through encouraging people to go outdoors and promoting healthier lifestyles. Therefore, it is considered that the effects will be positive. Both sites could contribute towards improving and enhancing development quality through careful design that integrates with its surroundings (ET10). IP256 could help to support local businesses as it is located close to a local centre and some minor benefits may be offered in encouraging investment.
IP105: Depot, Beaconsfield Road Ipswich
Central
The sites would directly support ER3 (housing) by providing housing to meet housing requirements. The site recorded a neutral score against SA Objectives ET1 (air quality), IP105 is currently in use therefore due to the proposed number of housing it is not considered that the increase on private cars as a result of development would significantly increase vehicular emissions. ET3 (waste) and ET4 (traffic) as provision of homes, cumulatively with proposed development in the immediate area, would lead to an increase in vehicles which could have effects on air quality and the environment though effects would be minor. The site would be developed on previously developed land and the remediation of contaminated land would help to improve the soil resources (ET2). The provision of homes close to Local Centre 35 would help to improve access (ER5) and would support the viability and vibrancy of these centres (ER6). The provision of decent housing close to areas of open space would also help to reduce social inclusion, promote healthier lifestyles and encourage community participation (HW1, HW2 and ER1). Through secured by design measures, housing provision could also help to increase natural surveillance and reduce opportunities for crime.

Policy SP3 Land with planning permission or awaiting a Section 106

Site Allocation Location Significant Findings
IP0150a: Land at Ravenswood South East Mixed scores are recorded against the SA Objectives. The increase in people and cars in the long term would have negative effects on air quality and the environment due to vehicle emissions and would increase waste production (ET1, ET3, ET4 and ET6). The site would support SA Objective HW1, HW2 and ER1 as they would improve the quality of housing stock and would contribute towards increasing the quality of life for residents. The improvement of housing stock within the area would aid economic regeneration which would raise living standards and help to minimise anti-social activity (CD1).
IP059b: Arclion House, Hadleigh Road
IP168 Stoke Park Drive
South West Mixed scores are recorded against the SA Objectives. The increase in people and cars in the long term would have negative effects on air quality and the environment due to vehicle emissions and would increase waste production (ET1, ET3, ET4 and ET6). The sites would be developed on previously developed land and the remediation of contaminated land would help to improve the soil resources (ET2). The sites would support SA Objective HW1, HW2 and ER1 as they would improve the quality of housing stock and would contribute towards increasing the quality of life for residents. The improvement of housing stock within the area would aid economic regeneration which would raise living standards and help to minimise anti-social activity (CD1).
IP176: 7-9 Woodbridge Road IP One Area
Central
The site directly supports SA Objective ER3, ‘To help meet the housing requirements for the whole community’. The site allocation scored positively against SA Objective ET4, ‘To reduce the effects of traffic upon the environment’ as it is located in close proximity to the primary and secondary shopping areas and this may reduce the need to travel by private car.
The site is not located in flood risk areas and there may be benefits for water if opportunities are sought to remediate some historical areas of contamination.
The site scored positively against SA Objectives HW1, HW2, ER3 and ER6 as the provision of quality housing close to Christchurch Park and close to land allocated for community and leisure use could help to encourage healthier lifestyles, efficient patterns of movement and community participation.
IP:253: Electric House, Lloyds Avenue IP One Area
Central
IP253 is located in central Ipswich and would be a conversion of an existing building. Due to the location of the site in the central urban area, access to facilities and shopping areas would be improved which would benefit SA Objective ET5. The site scored positively against HW2 (community participation) as they could encourage community participation through the provision of homes close to community and sports facilities.
IP074: Church and land at Upper Orwell Street
IP264: 28-32 Tacket Street
IP One Area
Central
These sites scored negatively against SA Objective ET1 (air quality) as they are located close to an AQMA and additional housing may result in increase in car use. In addition, there are potential negative effects associated with dust air and pollution during construction. IP074 has TPOs which may be affected by development. Positive scores are recorded against ET4 (traffic), ET5 (access), and ER1 (poverty) as the central location of the sites may encourage sustainable travel due to close proximity to key services and facilities which may also help to reduce social exclusion. The sites would support the viability and vitality of centres due to the central location and they would directly support SA Objective ER3 by providing housing to meet community requirements.
IP052: Land between Lower Orwell Street
IP011a: Smart Street / Foundation Street
IP One Area
Central
Part of IP011a is located within an AQMA. IP052 may generate traffic on Star Lane and key roads which may negatively affect air quality (ET1). Each of the sites would be developed on previously developed land: remediation would benefit the soil resources (ET2).
IP011b and IP052 both scored negatively against ET3 (waste) as they would increase waste generated and cumulatively, negative effects against this SA Objective are expected with other developments in the IP One Area. The sites scored positively against ET4, ET5, ER1, HW1 and HW2 as the central location of the sites may reduce car reliance and could improve health, access to key services and facilities whilst supporting community participation and reducing social exclusion.
IP011a is located adjacent to a Conservation Area. There are also listed buildings that could be affected by development at these sites and each of the sites is located within an Area of Archaeological Importance.
IP205: Burton’s College Street
IP206: Cranfields, College Street
IP211: Regatta Quay, Key Street
IP132: Former St Peter’s Warehouse Site 4 Bridge Street
IP One Area
Central
The site allocations will cumulatively lead to an increase in people due to housing development which will increase waste, cars and ultimately vehicle emissions which will have a negative effect on air quality (ET1). Whilst there are two bus stations and Ipswich Railway Station near the sites, the area is not currently served by local public transport in addition, the main shopping area is located north of the sites and existing employment areas are further south and west which may result in increased private car use and congestion issues therefore negative effects were recorded against ET4. It is noted that the Core Strategy is committed to extending the free shuttle bus, which may reduce impacts. IP206 and IP211 are located adjacent to the River Orwell County Wildlife Site and there are potential negative effects due to noise, air pollution and disturbance to species along the river all of which would detract from SA Objective ET8 (biodiversity).The sites are located on the waterfront and each scored negatively against SA Objective ET10 ‘To conserve and enhance the quality and local distinctiveness of landscapes and townscapes’ as there could potentially be negative effects to the local character of Neptune Marina and the quays in the area. The sites are located in flood zone 2 and 3 with a risk of flooding from the river Orwell. The provision of housing could have positive indirect effects on health and improving quality of life and could also help to reduce social exclusion through improving access in some cases to community facilities.
IP178: Island House, Duke Street
IP226: Helena Road
IP042: Land between Cliff Quay and Landseer Road
IP One Area
South East
IP178 is located close to an AQMA and as a result of an increase in residents cumulatively in the immediate area; traffic may be generated in the vicinity of Duke Street, A1156 and Fore Street. Each of the sites would benefit ET2 as each site is on previously developed land and through remediation the soil resources could be improved. The relatively central location of sites could help to encourage more sustainable modes of transport in some cases and could help to improve access to key services (ET4). IP178, IP226 and western parts of IP042 fall within flood zone 2 and 3.
IP042 is adjacent to a Holywells Park CWS and IP226 is in close proximity to the river Orwell to the west. One TPO is located within the northern parts of IP042 and an application for Tree Works may be required as each of these features has the potential to experience negative effects. Listing buildings are adjacent or near IP042. It should be noted that the redevelopment which has planning permission at IP042 has been allowed as enabling development to bring the listed brewery back into use and thereby secure its future. Therefore effects are assessed as positive.
IP200: Griffin Wharf, Bath Street IP One Area
South West
The site scored negatively against SA Objective ET1 (air quality). The site is located a significant distance from any AQMAs however it is likely that residents from the development will contribute to increased traffic generated northbound in order to access shopping areas. The site scored negatively against SA Objective ET5 as potential access constraints exist and they are associated with negative effects on the local highway network at junction A137. The site is located in flood zones 2 and 3 and is prone to flooding from the river Orwell. IP200 is located adjacent to a CWS and the indicative capacity at this site suggests potential negative effects on the designated site associated with noise, pollution and disturbance to species. The provision of housing close to existing employment areas and a range of community facilities could help to encourage efficient patterns of movement and would help to support the vitality and viability of town centres supporting SA Objectives ER5 and ER6. Development would help to support town centre viability as it would in the long term provide an increase in potential users of facilities and services.
IP169: 23-25 Burrell Road
IP047 Land at Commercial Road
IP One Area
South West
The sites are located near the AQMA which is designated due to air pollution along Vernon Street and Bridge Street. IP047 will contribute to an increase of new residents in the area as it is anticipated that 129 new homes will be built. As a result of a significant number of new residents, the traffic is likely to increase on key roads adjacent to the site albeit to a small extent. It is considered likely that residents from the new housing dwellings at IP031 and IP169 could generate additional traffic eastbound along Burrell road to access shopping areas and community services in the town centre area via Bridge Street. However, the number of dwellings does not suggest a significant change from the baseline. IP169 is located close to parks, schools, facilities and services all of which would improve access to schools, key services and would help to encourage community engagement and improve health, supporting several SA Objectives. Allocating housing at IP169 and IP047 would help to meet local housing needs whilst providing decent homes close to facilities which would help to improve quality of life and human health and would contribute towards reducing social exclusion supporting SA Objectives HW1, HW2 and ER1.
IP047 is located on previously developed and potentially contaminated land. Remediation of this land would help to improve the soil resources and would benefit SA Objective ET2.
IP088: 79 Cauldwell Hall Road
IP109: R/O Jupiter Road and Reading Room
Ipswich
North East
IP109 seeks to provide 13 homes and IP088 seeks to provide 16 homes and for this reason effects on air quality and climate change have been recorded as neutral due to negligible impacts as a result of development. Positive scores were recorded against ET2 as development would allow for the remediation of contaminated land. The sites are located close to a District Centre and two Local Centres therefore access to these sites would be improved on a minor scale. High quality housing provision would help to support quality of life and reduce social exclusion (HW1, HW2 and ER1). The use of secured by design measures would help to reduce opportunities for crime and anti-social behaviour.
IP090: Europa Way Ipswich
North West
The site scored negatively against ET1 (air quality) as it seeks to provide homes which would cumulatively increase the number of people and vehicles within the local area and negatively affect air quality. There is a proposed District Centre within this site which would directly improve access to key services (ET5). The site contains vegetation and TPOs which could be affected by development. The site could contribute to enhancing local distinctiveness as well as reducing crime opportunities through sensitive design and secured by design measures.
IP129: BT Depot, Woodbridge Road
IP161: 2 Park Road
Ipswich
North
The site allocations would also directly support the provision of housing to meet local needs (ER3). Negative effects were recorded for IP129 against ET3 (waste), ET4 (traffic) and ET6 (climate change) as the sites would cumulatively result in an increase in the local population and private cars which would have a negative effect on climate change though these effects would be minor. Waste production would also increase though waste reduction initiatives where possible would help to reduce waste. Positive scores are recorded for IP129 against SA Objective CD1, ER5, ER6 and ER7 as the development of homes would help to minimise potential for crime and anti-social behaviour though secured by design measures and natural surveillance.
IP246: 158-160 London Road
IP135: 112-116 Bramford Road
IP130: South of South Street
Ipswich
North West
The site allocations scored neutrally against SA Objectives ET1 (air quality) and ET4 (traffic) as the size of each size does not suggest a significant increase in residents in the area. IP135 is located in an area with potentially difficult access which may have a minor localised effect on traffic. The sites would be developed on PDL and the remediation of contaminated land would help to improve the soil resources (ET2). The provision of homes close to Local Centre 35 and District Centre 7 would help to improve access and would support the viability and vibrancy of these centres (ER5). The provision of housing close to areas of open space would also help to reduce social inclusion, promote healthier lifestyles and encourage community participation (HW1, HW2 and ER1). Through secured by design measures, housing provision could also help to increase natural surveillance and reduce opportunities for crime.

Policy SP5 Land allocated for employment use

Site Allocation Location Significant Findings
IP147: Land between railway junction and Hadleigh Road South West The site allocation would result in negative effects against five of the environmental SA Objectives. It would result in a daily increase of workers and residents in the long term causing increased emissions and effects to the environment. Development would directly support SA Objective ER2, ‘To offer everybody the opportunity for rewarding and satisfying employment’, by providing employment during construction and during operation. IP147 would help to attract investment, create jobs and could help to encourage efficient patterns of movement providing increased presence within local centres. It would address job provision, which would help to increase quality of life supporting SA Objectives HW1, HW2, ER2, ER4, ER5, ER6 and ER7.
IP146: Ransomes Europark East South East IP146 would create employment areas at three locations which would result in increase of traffic and negative effect on air quality (ET1) however public transport could mitigate some of this increase. There are bus routes located nearby the Ransomes Europark with connections close to the Makro store. Provision of employment land would attract investment, in the long term would create jobs and increase wages and standards of living for the local population which would serve to improve quality of life, and reduce social exclusion. IP146 is presently on an area of unused fields. Development on this area could cause detriment to the soil resource. It would increase waste and would have the potential to affect protected species which would detract from SA Objective ET3. The removal of existing fields and grassland and replacement hard standing would increase runoff and decrease ground absorption.
IP067: Former British Energy Site
IP058: Former Volvo Site, Raeburn Road South
IP099: Part of former Volvo Site, Raeburn Road South
South East IP067, IP058 and IP099 each had mixed scores against the SA Objectives. The area around IP067 and IP099 is presently affected by odour from the nearby sewage works which has been identified as an existing barrier to development. Each of these proposals scored positively against SA Objectives ET2 (soil resources). IP058 is presently a County Wildlife Site and development here would seek to promote the wildlife associated with its status. The removal of existing structures and hard standing at the sites (IP067 former British energy site, IP099 and IP058 both former Volvo sites) would decrease the potential run off by increasing ground absorption. The employment sites would help to attract inward investment and would provide the opportunity for rewarding employment, sustainable economic growth and would help to increase living standards which could support quality of life and the vitality and viability of centres (ET5, HW2, ER2, ER4, ER5, ER6 and ER7).
IP152: Airport Farm Kennels, north of the A14
IP150c Land south of Ravenswood
South East The sites are likely to increase traffic and negatively affect air quality though this could be mitigated by increasing public transport provision. These site allocations would directly support economic SA Objectives by offering employment opportunities, support efficient patterns of movement and inward investment (ER2, ER6 and ER7). The sites would also help to attract people into the local area which would help to support local centres and businesses to achieve sustainable levels of growth.
IP035: Key Street / Star Lane / Burtons (St. Peter Port) The area along Star Lane, College Street and Bridge Street is designated as an AQMA and this site has the potential to contribute to increasing vehicles particularly from users of the office or hotel buildings which may negatively affect air quality (ET1 and ET4). The site is located in flood zone 2 and 3 and at risk of flooding from the river Orwell. However, as mitigation, Policy DM4 from the Core Strategy addresses flood risk. The site would support SA Objective ER2 ‘To offer everybody the opportunity for rewarding and satisfying employment’ as it is sought to be used for employment which in the long term would provide employment opportunities. The site would also support the viability and vitality of the town centre as it would help to meet demands of growing numbers of residents (ER5). The site would be developed on previously developed land and remediation measures would help to improve the soil resources (ET2). Waste production is likely to increase on the whole due to the scale of development.
IP037: Island site IP One Area
Central
The site would be developed on brownfield land and remediation measures would help to improve the soil resources (ET2). The site allocation scores positively against ER2 (employment) and ER (5) as it will provide employment opportunities and will also support the viability and vitality of the town centre. The site is located in flood zone 2 and 3, is surrounded by a designated county wildlife site and is close to an SPA south of the river Orwell therefore potential negative effects are associated with deterioration of air quality, water quality and disturbance to protected species. However, it should be noted that an Appropriate Assessment under the Habitats Regulations has been carried out to consider any potential impacts of the plan on the SPA, which does not identify potential impacts on the SPA from the Island Site redevelopment. Waste production and crime levels could potentially increase due to the size of new development.
IP094: Land to rear of Grafton House IP One Area
South West
This site is located on previously developed land and possible contamination has been identified. Remediation of this land would help to improve the soil resources (ET2). The site is served by public transport. In the long term the development is likely to result in increase of waste production ET3 ‘To reduce waste’. The site would directly support SA Objective ER2 as it would provide employment use land. It would also help to achieve levels of sustainable prosperity and economic growth (ER4). The provision of employment in the long term may help to reduce social exclusion and poverty and could help to achieve SA Objective HW2 cumulatively with other development including housing and open space in close proximity to this site.
IP004: Bus depot Sir Alf Ramsey Way
IP051: Old Cattle Market Portman Road
IP One Area
South West
The sites are located in areas served by public transport which may reduce the need for private car use, although IP051 also potentially includes car parking which may support car use. There are also a number of employment sites in close proximity which may encourage the implementation of car share schemes as well as more sustainable travel modes supporting directly SA Objective ET4. As each of the sites is located in central Ipswich, close to shopping areas access to key services will be improved supporting SA Objective ET5. IP004 and IP096 are located within flood zones 2 and 3 and are at risk of flooding from the river Orwell. The sites will help to support SA Objective ER2 ‘To offer everybody the opportunity for rewarding and satisfying employment’, by providing employment opportunities during construction and operational phases. The sites scored positively against SA Objectives HW1, HW2 and ER5 as the location of each of the sites close to shops, facilities and services will help to encourage community participation whilst supporting town centre vitality and viability.
IP140: Land north of Whitton Lane Ipswich
North West
The site scored negatively against ET2 as it would result in the direct loss of greenfield land. The employment area would directly support the provision of employment opportunities (ER2) and this could also help to attract inward investment and support economic growth (ET5 and ER7). The site scored negatively against SA Objective ET7 (water quality) and ET8 (biodiversity) as it would result in loss of greenfield land which could increase surface runoff. The site could contain hedgerows and areas of significance for wild life which may also be lost to development.
IP011b
IP015
IP043
IP052
IP054
These site allocations have already been assessed previously in the tables above and the assessments are not repeated in this table.

Policy SP6 Land allocated and protected as open space

Site Allocation Location Significant Findings
IP263: West of Bridge Street IP One Area
Central
This site may contribute partially to achieving SA Objective ET1 ‘To improve air quality’ with the provision of 0.17ha of open space at the Waterfront. The site would be developed on brownfield land and remediation would improve the soil resources. SA Objective ET8 (biodiversity) would receive some benefits as the site is allocated for open space which may also help to improve health and quality of life as well as social inclusion and community participation (HW1, HW2, ER1 and ER1). Habitat creation and enhancement could also benefit landscape and townscape at this site (ET10).
IP037: Island Site IP One Area
Central
The site scored negatively against SA Objective CD1 (crime). It is ranked as an area less deprived when compared to those adjacent to it and in the short term may lead to an increase in crime levels. Positive and negative effects were recorded against SA Objective ET5 as constraints are identified with the potential increase in residents relating to the need to provide vehicular/pedestrian/cycle access via a new bridge. The site is located in flood zone 2 and 3 and providing open space would have a positive impact on flood risk as the area has potential to absorb flood waters. However, it should be noted that the open space would be within developments, which has the potential to increase flood risk. The site is surrounded by a designated county wildlife site and is close to an SPA south of the river Orwell therefore potential negative effects are associated with disturbance to protected birds. Provision of open space would benefit human health and would encourage community participation benefitting SA Objectives HW1 and HW2.
IP142: Land at Duke Street IP One Area
South East
The site is located close to an AQMA and the provision of open space would help improve local air quality. The site would benefit ET2 as it is on previously developed land which is likely to be contaminated and through remediation the soil resources could be improved. The relatively central location of the site could help to encourage more sustainable modes of transport in some cases and could help to improve access to key services (ET4). This site could directly benefit health and quality of life (HW1 and HW2) with the provision of open space and it is also located close to Holywells and Alexandra Park which could further promote healthier lifestyles. Potential positive effects are associated with improving access to education as the University Campus Suffolk is located close to the site (CL1).
IP083: Banks of the river upriver from Princes Street IP One Area
South West
The provision of open space could help to encourage people to walk and cycle more which may have a positive effect on air quality as well as human health, wellbeing and quality of life, supporting SA Objectives ET1, ET4, ET5, ET6, HW1, HW2 and ER6. Retaining open space at this site could also benefit ET8 by potentially supporting wildlife and it would help to reduce runoff in the floodplain supporting SA Objective ET7.
IP029 Land opposite 674-734 Bramford Way
IP033 Land at Bramford Road (Stocks Site)
Ipswich
South West
The provision of open space with IP029 and IP033 will help improve local air quality. The sites scored positively against ET5 (access) as they each would contribute to improving access to key services and IP029 and IP033 would provide open space which would directly serve housing development at these sites. IP029 and IP033 currently contain vegetation and TPOs which could be affected by development. The sites could contribute to enhancing local distinctiveness through careful design.
IP032
IP048
IP116
IP061
North West
Central
North East
South West
These sites have been assessed previously. Open spaces are likely to have potential positive impacts on health, air quality and biodiversity.

Policy SP7: Land allocated for leisure uses or community facilities

Site Allocation Location Significant Findings
IP150b: Land south of Ravenswood South East Development of a sports facility at IP150b would lead to an increase in movement which may have an effect on air quality and the environment (ET1).
IP150b would benefit HW1 (health), HW2 (quality of life) and ER1 (poverty) as the development of sports facilities would provide means for promoting healthier lifestyles and encouraging community participation whilst helping to reduce social exclusion. Development at these sites would help to attract inward investment which could benefit surrounding areas by sustaining local centres and improving access to facilities (ET5, ER5 and ER7).
IP260: The Former Odeon Cinema IP One Area
Central
The site is allocated for leisure uses/community facility and an increase in traffic would be expected though this would be determined by car parking provision. The Odeon is an existing vacant building which may be reused. As the site is allocated for leisure use there is potential for waste production to increase. The site scored negatively against SA Objective ET9, ‘To conserve and enhance the historic environment, heritage assets and their settings’ as it is located at close proximity to Listed Buildings and development could potentially affect these heritage assets.
IP258: Land at University Campus Suffolk as part of the Education Quarter IP One Area
Central
The site is located close to an AQMA and the proposed use of land as a new primary school would result in a daily increase in cars at peak times which may have an effect on air quality (ET1), although may result in reduced car use overall should it provide an opportunity for local residents to walk to school. There is a TPO near the site which may require an application for Tree Works. Community participation will be encouraged through the allocation of the site in central urban area near a wide range of facilities (e.g. parks, public transport infrastructure, university campus, etc.). The site will also contribute to the achievement of SA objective HW2 through the provision of a new primary school. The site would also directly support SA Objective CL1 ’To maintain and improve access to education and skills for young people and adults’ as it would provide a new primary school in a central accessible location.
IP005: Former Tooks Bakery, Old Norwich Rd Ipswich
South West
The site seeks to provide a health centre alongside its residential allocation. Negative scores were recorded against SA Objectives ET1 (air quality), ET3 (waste) and ET7 (water quality). An increase in cars cumulatively with other development in the immediate area could result in a negative contribution to local air quality. Waste production and water use would increase with new development.
The site scored positively against HW1, HW2, and ER1 as it will be providing a health centre which will help to support the health of local residents. It is also located close to existing playing fields which will also help to encourage community participation and reduce social exclusion.
IP010a Co-op Depot, Felixstowe Road South East This site has been assessed previously in the above tables.

Policy SP8 Orwell Country Park Extension

Site Allocation Location Significant Findings
IP149 Pond Hall Carr and Farm South East The extension to the country park proposed at IP149 could offer benefits to SA Objective ET8, ‘To conserve and enhance biodiversity and geodiversity, including favourable conditions on SSSIs, SPAs and SACs’, as it could help to enhance habitats within the area. The site is bordered by the internationally designated SPA/Ramsar and nationally designated SSSI. Opportunities to develop IP149 could also have a positive effect on these sites through appropriate visitor management measures. The Habitats Regulations Assessment (2014) has concluded that Policy SP8, regarding Site IP149, will not result in a likely significant effect upon any European site. IP149 would benefit HW1 (health), HW2 (quality of life) and ER1 (poverty) as the extending the existing country park would provide means for promoting healthier lifestyles and encouraging community participation whilst helping to reduce social exclusion. Development at these sites would help to attract inward investment which could benefit surrounding areas by sustaining local centres and improving access to facilities (ET5, ER5 and ER7).
IP149 would also particularly benefit SA Objective ET10, ‘To conserve and enhance quality ad local distinctiveness of landscapes and townscapes’.

Policy SP9 Safeguarding land on development sites for transport infrastructure

Site Allocation Location Significant Findings
IP010a/b
IP029
IP059a
IP037
IP-One area
South West
These have been assessed previously in the above tables.

Recommendations for mitigation measures

4.3.3 Recommendations to mitigate the significant negative effects include:

  • Provision of more frequent public transport to meet increased demand where necessary to ease traffic and address congestion/air quality issues. Where possible public transport links should be provided within 400m of development.

  • The use of sustainable modes of transport should also be encouraged through improvements to the pedestrian and cycling infrastructure.

  • Provision of green space will improve increase permeability and connectivity.

  • Sensitive development on account of the presence of TPOs.

  • Contaminated land remediation where appropriate will help to improve the soil resource. The development on brownfield sites should be encouraged where appropriate.

  • Recycling schemes should be promoted to reduce impact of additional waste.

  • Proposal should include a desktop ecological assessment to determine the need for detailed survey and appropriate site specific mitigation.

  • Surveys and mitigation for bird species should be undertaken at sites containing vegetation prior to construction works. The inclusion of soft landscaping would offer minor benefits to biodiversity.

  • Soft landscaping will mitigate partially impacts to loss of greenfield land.

  • Although the implementation of the tidal barrier and raised defences will raise the level of protection, there is still a residual risk of flooding by either failure of new defences or overtopping in extreme events. Development should be encouraged to use SuDS to manage runoff, further reduce flood risk and help protect groundwater and surface water quality.

  • Appropriate design of buildings should be required (through the use of traditional or sympathetic building materials and techniques) to complement and enhance existing designated buildings and local distinctiveness.

  • Secured by design principles should be considered to help deter anti-social behaviour.

  • Mitigation measures would be required if any archaeological remains are discovered to avoid damage to the heritage assets. Where appropriate mitigation measures can include completion of a licensed excavation and recording of remains before development commences.

  • New developments for employment use should meet BREEAM standards.

  • New residential developments should meet Code for Sustainable Homes standards.

  • Mitigation should also be implemented to encourage measures to reduce potable demand, use of rain water harvesting and grey water recycling systems to reduce domestic water use.

These are identified against the relevant site allocations/policies where appropriate.

4.4 Appraisal of IP-One Policies

4.4.1 The IP-One Policies define areas for development (Education Quarter, the Waterfront, and Ipswich Village), define routes for transport proposals and manage car parking provision in the town centre. The IP- One policies include the following:

  • SP10 Retail Site Allocations
  • SP11 Ipswich Waterfront
  • SP12 Education Quarter
  • SP13 Ipswich Village
  • SP14 Arts, Culture and Tourism
  • SP15 Improving Pedestrian and cycle routes
  • SP16 Transport Proposals in IP-One
  • SP17 Town Centre Car Parking

4.4.2 The detailed matrices are presented in Appendix E. The findings of the assessment are summarised below.

Policy SP10 - Retail Site Allocations

4.4.3 This policy relates to land at Westgate, allocated for A1 retail-led mixed use development, which could include other uses provided the predominantly retail use is delivered. This policy is likely to have both positive and negative impacts on air quality (ET1), traffic (ET4) and climate change (ER6). Concentration of uses in the town centre likely to be beneficial in terms of reducing the need for/distance of journeys although there may be effects on AQMAs and air quality in the town centre itself.

4.4.4 Policy SP10 will result in an increase in waste from the Westgate retail allocation due to its proposed use.

4.4.5 Policy SP10 promotes retail uses within the town centre, which are accessible by public transport. This would help reduce the use of private cars and greenhouse emissions. However, it may result in increased use of private cars from outside Ipswich and this would increase greenhouse emissions. As such, this policy scored both positively and negatively against ET6.

4.4.6 The policy provides for retail and mixed use in the town centre and as such, the policy has scored positively against SA Objectives ER1, ER7, ER5, ER4, and ER2. Although fairly tenuous SP10 commitment to largely focussing employment development within the accessible town centre may help to encourage healthy lifestyles (HW1).

4.4.7 This policy is expected to have neutral effects on HW2, ET2, CL1, and ET7. Although Policy SP10 seeks residential-led scheme on the eastern half of the site, it is considered that the overall contribution to ER3 will be neutral.

4.4.8 Regarding ET9 and ET10, Westgate is within an area of archaeological importance but the policy relates to previously developed land and any impact on archaeological resources is unlikely. However, the Mint Quarter, to which SP10 applies, is within a Conservation Area and potential negative effects on heritage assets are recorded.

Policy SP11 - Ipswich Waterfront

4.4.9 Policy SP11 relates to the Waterfront, which remains the focus for regeneration within central Ipswich to create mixed use neighbourhoods – residential, community, office, arts, culture and tourism. Much of the 80ha area is developed but a few key sites remain to be redeveloped. This policy may result in an increased use of private cars by future residents who may travel to areas outside Ipswich and by people that may be travelling to these cultural facilities and employment uses from outside Ipswich and this may negatively impact air quality. However, the area is accessible by foot, particularly for residents in the town centre, and providing a mix of uses alongside the existing mix of uses in the town centre would provide opportunities for walking/cycling. This policy scores positively and negatively against ET1, ET4 and ET6.

4.4.10 The proposed developments in SP11 could potentially lead to an increase in waste production within the Waterfront. This policy scores negatively against ET3 (waste).

4.4.11 This policy scores positively against ET5. It would help reduce dependence on the private car through proposals for new housing, which would be accessible to the town centre. Policy SP11 relates to the Waterfront, which is adjacent to the River Orwell and the Neptune Marina and is within Flood Zones 2 and 3. Although the construction of the tidal barrier and raised defences would raise the level of protection, there is still a residual risk of flooding by either failure of the new defences, or overtopping in extreme events. It scores negatively against ET7 as developments may increase the risk of flooding.

4.4.12 Policy SP11 relates to the Waterfront Area, which is adjacent to the River Orwell where developments have potential to have a short-term negative impact on water species and habitats from construction activities. There may be temporary disturbance to species but the overall effect in the long term is not significant.

Policy SP12 – Education Quarter

4.4.13 SP12 focuses development for education and ancillary uses, such as student accommodation or offices within the Education Quarter. This policy is likely to have a positive impact within the quarter and reduce the number of trips by private car since the developments would be within the Suffolk New College Campus and the University Campus Suffolk. This policy scores positively against ET1, ET4 and ER6. Developments proposed within SP12 could potentially lead to an increase in waste within the Education Quarter and has a negative score against ET3. SP12 directly supports the SA Objective ET5 and highlights the important serving role of the Education Quarter as an area to provide key service needs for the academic institutions and the local residents.

4.4.14 This policy scores both positively and negatively against ET6. It would help reduce dependence on the private car by supporting student accommodation accessible to the University Campus Suffolk and the Suffolk New College. However, the policy applies to areas within flood zones and any new developments would need to take into account flood risk at the design stage.

4.4.15 Policy SP12 scores negatively against ET7 since the Education Quarter is located adjacent to the Neptune Wharf and this area is within Flood Zones 2 and 3. A section of the University Quarter (open space and car parks) is adjacent to the Neptune Marina and therefore potential negative impacts are identified with regard to biodiversity. However, the University Quarter has some mature trees and is adjacent to Alexandra Park, which may be affected by new developments. A negative score against ET8 has been recorded.

4.4.16 This policy scores negatively against ET9 and ET10. There are a number of heritage assets within and in the vicinity of the Education Quarter, therefore there is potential for new developments relating to Policy SP12 to have an impact on the listed buildings/scheduled monuments and their settings during construction periods. The Education Quarter lies outside the Conservation Areas. It adjoins the Central and St Helens Conservation Areas. There is potential for new developments to impact heritage assets. However, it is accepted that Core Strategy Policies CS4 and DM9 would offer some protection.

4.4.17 The policy scores positively against the following SA Objectives: HW1, HW2, ER1, ER2, ER3, ER4, ER5, ER6, and CL1. SP12 seeks provision of residential accommodation which may have indirect health benefits from good quality housing. SP12 seeks to provide residential and educational ancillary uses, which would contribute to the quality of life of students and the local community. SP12 would make some contribution to the SA Objective through providing the educational community with key services and facilities which would support the reduction of social exclusion. This policy would also contribute to SA Objectives by seeking to provide employment in developments relating to educational ancillary uses and residential accommodation. It will support the economic growth, the vitality of the town centre and the Education Quarter and would encourage investment. By providing for ancillary services, it supports access to education.

4.4.18 This policy has both negative and positive scores against CD1. It is possible that development within, and overall regeneration of the Education Quarter would increase natural surveillance and potentially contribute to a reduction in crime levels. However, there may be increased opportunities for crime within the town centre due to increase in population and businesses.

4.4.19 This policy scores neutrally against SA Objective ET2.

Policy SP13 Ipswich Village

4.4.20 Policy SP13 relates to Ipswich Village, which remains the focus for regeneration within central Ipswich replacing older industries with office development. SP13 may result in an increased use of private cars by people that may be travelling to employment areas from outside Ipswich. Increased traffic may negatively impact air quality and climate change. However, the area is accessible by public transport. This policy scores positively and negatively against ET1, ET4 and ET6.

4.4.21 SP11 could potentially lead to an increase in waste production as a result of business and office operational activities. This policy scores negatively against ET3 (waste).

4.4.22 Policy SP13 scores positively against ET5. This policy seeks to provide offices/leisure facilities in the west part of the town centre. The policy would contribute partially towards minimising traffic levels within the Borough as they would be located within the town centre, where sustainable modes of transport are available.

4.4.23 Policy SP13 relates to Ipswich Village, the majority of which is located within Flood Zone 2 and 3. Although the construction of the tidal barrier and raised defences would raise the level of protection, there is still a residual risk of flooding by either failure of the new defences, or overtopping in extreme events.

4.4.24 There are no heritage assets in the vicinity of Ipswich Village; therefore no impacts are recorded with regard to SA Objective ET9. Policy SP13 would make some contributions to SA Objectives HW2, ER1, ER2, ER3, ER4, ER5, ER6, and ER7 though provision of adequate employment areas in the town centre easily accessible to residents and supporting mixed-used neighbourhood of residential use, open space and main town centre uses.

Policy SP14 – Arts, Culture and Tourism

4.4.25 Policy SP14 supports the retention and enhancement of existing facilities, providing for arts, culture and tourism activities as well as the creation of new facilities including visitor accommodation within the town centre boundary and the Waterfront area. The facilities will be located in the town centre, which is well served by public transport which may reduce impact on air quality. However, there may also be those who would travel by private car to these facilities. This policy scores both positively and negatively against SA Objectives ET1, ET4 and ET6.

4.4.26 This policy scores negatively against ET3. The development of cultural facilities and visitor accommodation as proposed in SP14 could also lead to an increase in waste within the Waterfront and within the town centre.

4.4.27 This policy directly supports the SA Objective ET5 as it seeks to provide arts, cultural and tourism services to the surrounding population and the wider area around Ipswich. The Waterfront, where this policy applies is within a flood risk zone. For this reason, the policy scores negatively against ET7.

4.4.28 Policy SP14 proposes arts, cultural and tourism facilities in the town centre and visitor accommodation in the Waterfront, where developments have potential to impact freshwater species and habitats. A negative score is recorded against ET8.

4.4.29 Policy SP14 applies to the town centre, where a number of listed buildings and scheduled monuments may be directly affected by new developments relating to arts, culture and tourism. Most of the town centre is within the Central Conservation Area, so there is potential for new developments to impact historical sites. SP14 relate to Waterfront and the town centre which are within Conservation Areas – Central and Wet Dock. Depending on the design of the new developments, there is potential to impact townscape. This policy scores negatively against ET9 and ET10.

4.4.30 This policy scores positively against HW2, ER1, ER2, ER3, ER4, ER5, ER6, ER7, and CL1. SP14 seeks to provide arts, tourism and cultural facilities within the Waterfront and the town centre. New developments will contribute to the vitality and vibrancy of these areas and help to improve quality of life of residents as well as contribute towards encouraging community participation. The arts and cultural facilities would also support the reduction of social exclusion. There will be contribution to employment opportunities from the arts, culture and tourism uses. This policy will support economic growth and may encourage investment in the borough.

4.4.31 This policy has both negative and positive scores against CD1. It is possible that development of such uses which may attract people into the area in the evenings and at weekends may increase natural surveillance and potentially contribute to a reduction in crime levels. However, there may be increased opportunities for crime within the town centre due to increase in activity.

4.4.32 This policy scores neutrally against SA Objectives HW1, ET2 and ER3 and CL1.

Policy SP15 – Improving Pedestrian and Cycle routes

4.4.33 SP15 supports improvements to pedestrian and cycle routes within the town centre and those linking the town centres to residential areas and beyond, which is likely to contribute to improved air quality, reduction of car use and efficient movement of traffic. Policy SP15 would improve access to services within the town centre and also the wider area. The provision of cycling and walking routes may reduce car use. It scores positively against ET1, ET4, ET5 and ET6.

4.4.34 This policy scores positively against HW1. By improving pedestrian and cycle routes SP15 may encourage people to cycle or walk and thus offering some direct health benefits.

4.4.35 SP15 supports the SA Objective ER5 by making the town centre accessible by cycling and walking. This increased accessibility would attract more people to visit the town centre and contribute to its vitality in the long term.

4.4.36 This policy scored neutrally against ET2, ET3, ET7, ET8, ET9, ET10, HW2, ER2, ER3, ER4, ER7, and CD1,

Policy SP16 – Transport Proposals in IP-One

4.4.37 SP16 safeguards provision of a new Wet Dock Crossing. The Star Lane Gyratory, which is a key east-west corridor, causes congestion and poor air quality as well as a barrier to pedestrian movement between the Waterfront and the Central Shopping Area. This policy is likely to have positive on ET1, ET4 and ET6 since it may reduce cars on the gyratory.

4.4.38 Policy SP16 would provide a pedestrian crossing between the Waterfront and Central Shopping Area, which would improve access to services by both the Waterfront residents and those in the Central Shopping Area. This policy scores positively against ET5.

4.4.39 Policy SP16 will improve access within the Waterfront, the town centre and areas beyond, which will help support the vitality of the town centre and ER5.

4.4.40 This policy scored neutrally against ET2, ET3, ET7, ET8, ET9, ET10, HW1, HW2, ER1, ER2, ER3, ER4, ER7, CL1 and CD1.

Policy SP17 – Town Centre Car Parking

4.4.41 SP17 provides for a Central Car Parking Core within Ipswich town centre. Car parks are proposed in the Mint Quarter, Shed No 8 Orwell Quay and Turret Lane, which are already existing car parks within or close to Air Quality Management Areas. The policy states that it supports the Travel Ipswich measures and encourages the use of sustainable modes of transport. However, the increase in car parking spaces in the town centre would have an adverse effect on air quality, traffic and efficient movement of traffic. This policy scores negatively against ET1, ET4 and ET6.

4.4.42 SP17 would improve access to services within the town centre from within the borough and surrounding areas as people can drive into the centre. It therefore scores positively against ET5. Providing additional parking spaces within the town centre would increase greenhouse emissions. This policy therefore scores negatively against ET6. Car parks south and southwest of the town centre are within Flood Zones 2 and 3.

4.4.43 Policy SP17 may have a negative impact on heritage assets as there are listed buildings in the vicinity of the Crown Street, Mint Quarter, and Turret Lane, where car parks are proposed. Shed 8 Orwell Quay and Turret Lane are located in an Area of Archaeological Importance. Policy SP17 supports the development of car parks, which have the potential to impact the character of Conservation Areas and has scored negatively against ET10 (Shed 8 Orwell Quay is adjacent to a Conservation Area; Turret Lane is within a Conservation Area). Depending on the design of the car parks, these have potential to impact the character of the Conservation Areas.

4.4.44 Car parks would encourage people from within and outside the borough to drive into the town centre, which would contribute to the vitality of the town centre. SP17 recognises that providing sufficient car parking in the town centre may support the town centre economy and encourage investments. This policy scores positively against ER5 and ER7.

4.4.45 This policy scored neutrally against ET2, ET3, ET7, ET8, HW1, ER1, ER2, ER3, ER4, CL1, and CD1.

Recommendations

4.4.46 To improve the sustainability of these policies, the following are recommended:

  • Although policy SP17 lists the benefits of promoting sustainable transport choices, it is recommended that it includes details on how it supports sustainable modes of transport within IP-One.

  • It is recommended that Policies should include reference to the provision of adequate waste facilities and where possible recycling facilities within the Central Shopping Area, Westgate and district centres.

  • It is recommended that these policies include reference to ensuring that new development does not exacerbate current flood risk issues in the area and the use of SuDS, wherever practicable.

  • It is recommended that Policies should include a reference to the design of new developments to be sensitive to Conservation Area characters and the protection of heritage assets.

  • It is recommended that secured by design principles are incorporated into new development to reduce the potential for crime and anti-social activities.

  • Biodiversity resources should be protected and enhanced where possible through retention of vegetation/mature trees and soft landscaping. Disturbance to freshwater habitats and species during construction near the Waterfront could be minimised through appropriate construction management measures.

4.5 Appraisal of Opportunity Areas

4.5.1 The IP-One Opportunity Areas include the following:

  1. Island Site

  2. Merchant Quarter

  3. Mint Quarter and surrounding area

  4. Education Quarter and surrounding area

  5. Westgate

  6. River Corridor and Princes Street Corridor

4.5.2 The detailed assessments of the opportunity areas are included in Appendix G. The following section presents the summary of the findings.

Opportunity A – Island Site

4.5.3 The regeneration of Opportunity Area A – The Island Site will increase traffic in this area, which would have a negative effect on air quality. Opportunity Area A is close to but not within an Air Quality Management Area (AQMA). Green areas and the reinstatement of the tree lined promenade may have a positive effect on air quality and climate change. This Opportunity Area scores positively and negatively against ET1, ET4, ET6, and ER6.

4.5.4 Developments in Opportunity Area A are mostly on brownfield sites. There are proposals to include some green areas in this Opportunity Area, which may improve soil quality. This Opportunity Area scores positively against ET2.

4.5.5 Opportunity Area A includes residential developments, which would increase household waste in the Borough. Other uses in mixed use developments– offices, cafes and restaurants would also produce waste. This Opportunity Area scores negatively against ET3.

4.5.6 Regeneration and redevelopment of Opportunity Area A, would improve access to services and scores positive against ET5. This Opportunity Area provides for heritage/cultural based visitor attractions, marina moorings, retail, cafes and restaurants.

4.5.7 Opportunity Area A scores negatively against ET7 and ET8 since the area is within Flood Zones 2 and 3. Development has potential to increase flood risk. The area around Opportunity Area A – Island Site west of the Orwell River and the Wet Dock area is designated as a Country Wildlife Site. It is also close to the Orwell Estuary Special Protection Area. There is potential for developments to have a negative effect on the species and habitats on the river, such as disturbance to birds during construction, therefore mitigation measures should be implemented and HRA assessment should be undertaken for developments.

4.5.8 This Opportunity Area scores both positively and negatively against ET9 and ET10. There are no listed buildings on Opportunity Area A but it is within an area of archaeological importance. There is potential for new development to have an impact on archaeological resources within the area during construction periods. The conversion of historic buildings should be sensitive to the character of the buildings. The Opportunity Area refers to enhancing the setting of historic buildings such as Felaw Maltings. Opportunity Area A is within the Wet Dock Conservation Area and there is potential to impact the character of the Conservation Area but also provides an opportunity to enhance townscape.

4.5.9 Opportunity Area A scores both positively and negatively against HW1. Opportunity Area A proposes residential developments, which would improve the housing stock within the Borough. Good quality housing will indirectly contribute positively to this SA Objective. However, new developments would increase traffic and affect air quality, which could also have a negative impact on health.

4.5.10 This Opportunity Area scores positively against HW2, ER1, ER2, ER3, ER4, ER5, and ER7. Opportunity Area A proposes employment, small scale retail, heritage and cultural based visitor attraction as well as public open space and waterfront promenade which would contribute to the quality of life within the Ipswich Waterfront. It would make some contribution to reducing poverty and social exclusion through providing communities with employment areas, key services and facilities. This policy supports employment, economic growth, housing, the town centre and district and local centres, and would encourage investment.

4.5.11 This Opportunity Area scores neutrally against CL1 (education). Opportunity Area A scores both positively and negatively against CD1. Crime levels may increase within the Opportunity Areas due to the increase in population, shops and businesses. However, increased employment opportunities and improved living standards may contribute to the reduction of crime.

Opportunity Area B – Merchant Quarter

4.5.12 This Opportunity Area scores negatively against SA Objective ET1. A section of the Opportunity Area B - Merchant Quarter is within an AQMA. This covers the area between Star Lane, College Street, and Fore Street. Increased development of sites in this area will result in increased traffic, which would have a negative effect on air quality. However, the area is accessible by public transport and pedestrian links are proposed, which may partially reduce traffic levels within the area and its impact on air quality.

4.5.13 The score for ET2 is uncertain. Developments in Opportunity Area B would mostly be located on brownfield sites. Remediation, if required, would improve soil quality.

4.5.14 This Opportunity Area scores negatively against ET3. Proposed residential developments would increase household waste in the Borough. Other uses in mixed use developments– offices, cafes and restaurants would also produce waste.

4.5.15 Opportunity Area B scores both positively and negatively against ET4 and ER6. Increased development within the Opportunity Area B would increase traffic as people from neighbouring areas may travel to this Quarter for shopping or work. However, pedestrian links are proposed in the Merchant Quarter. These would contribute partially towards reducing traffic levels within the town centre and may help encourage people to make more sustainable transport choices in the long term.

4.5.16 This Opportunity Area scores positively against ET5 since regeneration developments would increase access to services. Opportunity Area B provides for offices/businesses, cafes/restaurants and small scale retail.

4.5.17 This Opportunity Area B scores both negatively and positively against ET6. Opportunity Area B is accessible by public transport. This would help reduce the use of private cars and greenhouse gas emissions. Since the area is already built up, any development will be redevelopment of existing buildings. As such, it is unlikely that there would be impact on flood risk. This Opportunity Area scores neutrally against ET7.

4.5.18 This Opportunity Area scores negatively against ET8. Opportunity Area B is adjacent to the River Orwell and therefore new developments along the river have potential to impact habitats and species along the river, particularly during construction.

4.5.19 This Opportunity Area scores both positively and negatively against ET9, ET10 and HW1, There are a number of heritage assets (listed buildings and scheduled monuments) in Opportunity Area B, which is also in an Area of Archaeological Importance. There is potential for the listed buildings and their setting to be directly affected by new development during construction. However, this Opportunity Area refers to opportunities to reinforce existing historic character and Core Strategy Policies CS4, DM8 and DM9 offer some protection. This Opportunity Area lies between the Central and Wet Dock Conservation Areas and developments have the potential to impact the character of the Conservation Areas. Improved public realm may however enhance townscape character.

4.5.20 This Opportunity Area scores positively and negatively against HW1 since it proposes residential developments, which would increase the housing stock in the borough. However, new developments could increase traffic and affect air quality, which could also have a negative impact on health, whilst locating development in a location which provides opportunities for walking and cycling may have a positive effect on health, particularly through improving walking and cycling opportunities on Star Lane.

4.5.21 Opportunity Area B scores positively against HW2, ER1, ER2, ER3, ER4, ER5, and ER7. Opportunity Area B proposes residential, business, cafes and, small scale retail uses which provide key services and facilities to meet the needs of residents and improve the quality of life, within the Merchant Quarter and surrounding areas. It would make some contribution to reducing poverty and social exclusion through providing communities with employment areas, key services and facilities. This policy supports employment, economic growth, housing, the town centre and district and local centres, and would encourage investment.

4.5.22 This Opportunity Area scores neutrally against CL1 (education). Opportunity Area B scores both positively and negatively against CD1. Crime levels may increase within the Opportunity Areas due to the increase in population, shops and businesses. However, increased employment opportunities and improved living standards may contribute to the reduction of crime. The development of vacant sites and opening of spaces to further community use could lower anti-social behaviour records.

Opportunity Area C – Mint Quarter and Surrounding Area

4.5.23 Opportunity Area C- Mint Quarter is not within an AQMA but redevelopment of non-retail use, particularly residential and car parking would potentially increase traffic in the area. However, since the redevelopment would be located on an existing surface car park, the overall effect may depend on the number of new car parking spaces. In addition, this area is accessible by public transport and pedestrian links are proposed, which may reduce traffic and its impact on air quality. This Opportunity Area scores both positively and negatively against ET1.

4.5.24 The score for ET2 is positive. Developments in the Mint Quarter would be located on brownfield sites. Any contaminated sites would require a contaminated land risk assessment if developed. Remediation, if required, would improve soil quality.

4.5.25 This Opportunity Area scores negative against ET3. Proposed residential developments would increase household waste in the Borough. Other uses in mixed use developments– offices, cafes and restaurants would also produce waste.

4.5.26 Opportunity Area C scores both positively and negatively against ET4. Increased development within the Opportunity Area C would increase traffic. However, pedestrian links are proposed in the Mint Quarter. These would contribute partially towards reducing traffic levels within the town centre and may help encourage people to make more sustainable transport choices in the long term.

4.5.27 This Opportunity Area scores positively against ET5 since regeneration developments would increase access to services. Opportunity Area C provides for offices/businesses, cafes/restaurants and small scale retail.

4.5.28 This Opportunity Area scores both negatively and positive against ET6. Opportunity Area C is accessible by public transport. This would help reduce the use of private cars and greenhouse gas emissions. However, developments within the Mint Quarter may result in increased use of private cars by people outside Ipswich and this would increase greenhouse emissions.

4.5.29 This Opportunity Area scores neutrally against ET7 and ET8. The Mint Quarter is not within a flood zone and it is within a built up area and there is limited potential to impact biodiversity and flood risk.

4.5.30 Opportunity Area C scores both positively and negatively against ET9 and ET10. There are a number of heritage assets in the Mint Quarter, which is also in an area of archaeological importance. There is potential for listed buildings and their setting to be directly affected by new development during construction but there are also improvements of the public realm proposed. Opportunity Area C is also partly within a Conservation Area and there is potential for developments to impact the character of the Conservation Area and townscape. However, there are also opportunities for enhancement, particularly in areas of low townscape value.

4.5.31 Opportunity Area C scores positively against HW2, ER1, ER2, ER3, ER4, ER5, and ER7. Opportunity Area C proposes residential, business, cafes and small scale retail uses which provide key services and facilities to meet the needs of residents and improve the quality of life, within the Mint Quarter and surrounding areas. It would make some contribution to reducing poverty and social exclusion through providing communities with employment areas, key services and facilities. This policy supports employment, economic growth, housing, the town centre and district and local centres, and would encourage investment.

4.5.32 This Opportunity Area scores neutrally against CL1 (education) since it does not contribute to this SA Objective. Opportunity Area C scores both positively and negatively against CD1.

Opportunity Area D – Education Quarter and surrounding area

4.5.33 The area along Star Lane, Grimwade Street, Fore Street and Duke Street within Opportunity Area D – Education Quarter is within an AQMA. Should car parking proposals result in an increase in spaces this may increase road traffic in this area, which would have a negative effect on air quality. This Opportunity Area scores negatively against ET1.

4.5.34 The score for ET2 is positive. Developments within the Education Quarter would mostly be located on brownfield sites. Remediation, if required, would improve soil quality.

4.5.35 This Opportunity Area scores negatively against ET3. Proposed residential developments would increase household waste in the Borough. Other uses in mixed use developments– offices, cafes and restaurants would also produce waste.

4.5.36 Opportunity Area D scores both positively and negatively against ET4. Increased development and proposed car parking within the Opportunity Area would increase traffic. However, improved pedestrian links are proposed within the Opportunity Area. These would contribute partially towards reducing traffic levels within the town centre and may help encourage people to make more sustainable transport choices in the long term.

4.5.37 This Opportunity Area scores positively against ET5 since regeneration developments would increase access to education related services. This Opportunity Area provides for residential, hotel, offices/businesses, cafes/restaurants and small scale retail.

4.5.38 This Opportunity Area scores both negatively and positively against ET6 and negatively against ET7. The Education Quarter is accessible by public transport, which would help reduce the use of private cars and greenhouse gas emissions. However, developments within the Education Quarter may result in increased use of private cars by people outside Ipswich and this would increase greenhouse emissions. Parts of the Education Quarter are within Flood Zone 2 and 3. Although development principles state that layout and design should reduce flood risk, development in these areas may increase surface run-off through increased impervious surface area.

4.5.39 This Opportunity Area scores neutrally against ET8. The southern section in Opportunity Area D is located adjacent to the Wet Dock, where car parks are proposed. The area is currently a hard surfaced car park. As such, redevelopment would not increase surface water run-off. The design of the new car park should ensure that surface water run-off is contained.

4.5.40 Opportunity Area D scores both positively and negatively against ET9 and ET10. There are a number of listed buildings in the Education Quarter, which is also in an area of archaeological importance. There is potential for the listed buildings and their setting to be directly affected by new development during construction. Small parts of the Education Quarter fall within the Central Conservation Area and there is potential for developments to impact the character of the Conservation Area and townscape. However, there are also opportunities for enhancement.

4.5.41 Opportunity Area D scores positively against HW2, ER1, ER2, ER3, ER4, ER5, and CL1. Opportunity Area D proposes academic facilities, student accommodation, hotel, business, cafes and, small scale retail uses which provide key services and facilities to meet the needs of residents and improve the quality of life. It would make some contribution to reducing poverty and social exclusion through providing communities with employment areas, key services and facilities. This policy supports employment, economic growth, housing, the town centre and district and local centres, and would encourage investment.

4.5.42 Opportunity Area D scores both positively and negatively against CD1. Crime within the Opportunity Areas may increase due to the increase in population, shops and businesses. However, increased employment opportunities and improved living standards may contribute to the reduction of crime. The development of vacant sites and opening of spaces to further community use could reduce the number of anti-social behaviour cases.

Opportunity Area E - Westgate

4.5.43 This Opportunity Area scores both positively and negatively against SA Objectives ET1, ET4 and ER6. The regeneration of Opportunity Area E – Westgate includes a pedestrian link and new level crossings which would improve pedestrian movement within the area. The area is not within an AQMA. However, high density residential housing and shoppers’ car parking are proposed. Also, NO2 emissions along St Matthews Street have been recorded as high.

4.5.44 The score for ET2 is positive. Developments within Westgate would mostly be located on brownfield sites. Some sites may need to be remediated before any redevelopment. Remediation would improve soil quality.

4.5.45 This Opportunity Area scores negatively against ET3. Proposed residential developments would increase household waste in the Borough. Other uses in mixed use developments– offices, cafes and restaurants would also produce waste.

4.5.46 This Opportunity Area scores positively against ET5 since the proposals would improve access to shops and cultural facilities such as the New Wolsey Theatre. This Opportunity Area provides for residential, café/restaurants, retail shops and car parking.

4.5.47 This Opportunity Area scores both negatively and positively against ET6. Westgate is accessible by public transport, which would help reduce the use of private cars and greenhouse gas emissions. However, developments within Westgate, including car parking, may result in increased use of private cars by people outside Ipswich and this would increase greenhouse emissions.

4.5.48 Opportunity Area E scores neutrally against ET7 and ET8 as Westgate is not within a flood zone and this is a built up area with low biodiversity value.

4.5.49 Opportunity Area E scores both positively and negatively against ET9 and ET10. There are a number of listed buildings in Westgate, which is also in an area of archaeological importance. There is potential for the listed buildings and their setting to be directly affected by new development during construction. Westgate is adjacent to the Central Conservation Area and developments have the potential to impact townscape. However, the proposals, including to the public realm, also represent opportunities for enhancement.

4.5.50 Opportunity Area E scores positively against HW2, ER1, ER2, ER3, ER4, ER5, and ER7. Opportunity Area E proposes shopping, residential, café/restaurant uses which provide key services and facilities to meet the needs of residents and improve the quality of life, within Westgate and surrounding areas. It would make some contribution to reducing poverty and social exclusion through providing communities with employment areas, key services and facilities. This policy supports employment, economic growth, housing, and the town centre, and would encourage investment.

4.5.51 This Opportunity Area scores neutrally against CL1 and both positively and negatively against CD1. Crime within the Opportunity Areas may increase due to the increase in population, shops and businesses. However, increased employment opportunities and improved living standards may contribute to the reduction of crime. The development of vacant sites and opening of spaces to further community use could reduce the number of anti-social behaviour cases.

Opportunity Area F – River Corridor and Princes Street Corridor

4.5.52 Opportunity Area F – River Corridor and Princes Street Corridor are not within or near AQMAs. The area of car parking to the east of Portman Road has been identified as having potential for a mixed use development. The allocation would require replacement of the car parking on the site or at the site on West End Road. Although the large car park will be removed, it will need to be replaced nearby. As such, the development would have a neutral effect on transport and air quality. However, new pedestrian and cycle links are proposed along the Waterfront area which would reduce car use and its impact on air quality. Overall, this Opportunity Area scores positively against ET1, ET4 and ER6.

4.5.53 The score for ET2 is positive. Developments within the River Corridor and Princes Street Corridor would mostly be located on brownfield sites. Remediation, if required, would improve soil quality.

4.5.54 Opportunity Area F would be mainly offices and leisure uses and is expected to produce waste.

4.5.55 This Opportunity Area scores positively against ET5 since regeneration developments would increase access to shops and cultural facilities such as the New Wolsey Theatre. This Opportunity Area provides for residential, café/restaurants, retail shops and car parking.

4.5.56 Opportunity Area F scores both negatively and positively against ET6 and negatively against ET7. The River Corridor is near the railway station and the Princes Street Corridor links the station to the centre of town. There are proposals to enhance the riverside connection to the Waterfront Area as a setting for new pedestrian and cycling links. The River Corridor is within Flood Zone 2 and 3. Development in the area may increase flood risk.

4.5.57 This Opportunity Area scores negatively against ET8. Opportunity Area F is along the River Corridor and east of Princes Street is a Country Wildlife site. New development may have negative impacts on species and habitats along the river (e.g. noise disturbance).

4.5.58 Opportunity Area F scores neutrally against ET9 and both positively and negatively against ET10. There is a listed building in the area and there is potential for new development to impact the listed building or its setting. However, the potential impact is considered negligible. This Opportunity Area proposes an improved public realm in front of the station, which would contribute to the visual amenity in the area.

4.5.59 Opportunity Area F scores positively against HW1, HW2, ER1, ER2, ER4, ER5, and CL1. Opportunity Area F proposes leisure uses, which would have an indirect positive effect on health. It would contribute to the quality of life for commuters and also the residents along Princes Street and nearby areas. Office led mixed use development is proposed, which would make some contribution to reducing poverty and social exclusion through providing communities with employment areas, key services and facilities. This policy supports employment, economic growth and would encourage investment.

4.5.60 This Opportunity Area scores neutrally against ER3 as no residential use is proposed.

4.5.61 Opportunity Area F scores both positively and negatively against CD1. Crime within the Opportunity Areas may increase due to the increase in population, shops and businesses. However, increased employment opportunities and improved living standards may contribute to the reduction of crime.

Recommendations for Mitigation Measures

4.5.62 The following recommendations are proposed for the Opportunity Areas:

  • It is recommended that all Opportunity Areas should make reference to improving walking and cycling routes in these areas.

  • It is recommended that Opportunity Areas should include a reference to providing landscaped areas and green spaces where practicable.

  • It is recommended that Opportunity Areas should include reference to the provision of adequate waste facilities and where possible recycling facilities within the areas.

  • It is recommended that these Opportunity Areas include reference to ensuring that new development does not exacerbate current flood risk issues in the area and encourage the use of SuDS.

  • It is recommended that ecological assessments should be undertaken during the design phase of development proposals which are likely to affect biodiversity resources.

  • It is recommended that Opportunity Areas make reference to incorporating secured by design principles which would contribute towards reducing the potential for crime and anti-social activities.

4.6 Cumulative effects

4.6.1 The SEA Directive requires that the assessment includes identification of cumulative and synergistic effects (where the combined effects are greater than the sum of their component parts).

4.6.2 The assessment of the policies and site allocations has been undertaken in a manner which has enabled the cumulative effects of the policies to be assessed. This is important as none of the policies or site allocations would ever be implemented in isolation and the plan has to be read as a whole. There is also the potential for the plan to have cumulative effects with other plans and programmes that are produced by other authorities such as neighbouring local authorities or the Environment Agency.

4.6.3 Table 4-6 summarises the cumulative and synergistic impacts of the plan. The approach identifies receptors, for example the air quality or crime levels that may be affected by cumulative impacts. It also acknowledges where uncertainty has influenced the assessment. The cumulative and synergistic effects identified in the table are all considered to be significant effects.

Table 4-6 Cumulative and Synergistic Effects

Topic/SA Objective Cumulative / Synergistic Effect (Positive, Negative, Neutral) Commentary and Causes
Education provision and educational attainment (CL1 To maintain and improve access to education and skills for both young people and adults) Positive Educational attainment in the borough is generally lower than regional and national levels.
The policies/site allocations are likely to generate positive effects upon educational attainment through the allocation of land for employment use, primary and secondary schools and where necessary for students accommodation. New and diverse employment provision is likely to increase training opportunities, and encourage local partnerships and initiatives. All the residential site allocations in the IP-One area may benefit from the close location of University Campus Suffolk and Suffolk New College.
Crime and Fear of Crime
(CD1 To minimise potential opportunities for crime and anti-social activity)
Positive/Negative Crime levels are generally higher across the borough when compared to national average figures. The projected housing and population growth may result in a significant increase of new residents. This increase in population may have a negative effect on crime within the Borough in the short term, however it can be mitigated cumulatively through improved quality of life. The level of certainty of prediction is low as many factors could influence the crime levels.
Access to services
(ET5 To improve access to key services for all sectors of the population)
Positive/Negative Cumulatively, access will be improved where sites are located in the town centre near existing facilities and employment hubs. However, if all the sites are taken forward negative effects associated with access could occur on key roads in the town centre or the approach roads due to increased traffic and congestion. Mitigation measures will be required to reduce the negative effects, e.g. improved transport links, pedestrian infrastructure, etc.
Health and Well-Being
(HW1 To improve the health of those most in need
HW2 To improve the quality of life where people live and encourage community participation)
Positive Whilst health and well-being is affected by a number of factors, there is the potential to improve well-being by delivery of new housing and employment, areas of open/green space and the provision of new schools. There could be indirect benefits for health and well-being within areas where sites are allocated for new parks, river paths, and playing grounds.
Many of the policies seek enhancements for walking and cycling which would potentially improve health.
Housing
(ER3 To help meet the housing requirements for the whole community)
Positive Cumulatively, the site allocations for residential use should ensure that new housing development occurs in the most appropriate locations and meets the needs of a wide range of people. The residential site allocations should be planned in a way that it does not lead to oversupply of flats particularly in the town centre.
Sustainable Economic Growth
(ER4 To achieve sustainable levels of prosperity and economic growth throughout the plan area)
Positive Cumulatively, the site allocations for employment/retail/office use will have a positive effect on the sustainable growth of the borough as employment opportunities will increase both in the short-term and the long-term. The sites will contribute to the regeneration / redevelopment of central town areas, with some infrastructure improvements (car parking, the replacement of an electricity substation, etc.) which may increase the business attractiveness of the area.
Biodiversity – protection of designated sites
(ET8 To conserve and enhance biodiversity and geodiversity, including favourable conditions on SSSIs, SPAs and SACs)
Negative/Positive Cumulatively, the site allocations will have both negative and positive effects on biodiversity. Negative effects are identified where TPOs could potentially be affected by development. In addition, sites allocations near the River Orwell may result in disturbance of species during construction activities. The redevelopment of brownfield sites would provide opportunities for enhancements, particularly where this relates to improving connections.
Some positive effects may occur as a result of the delivery of open space but cumulatively the amount of land allocated for open space does not suggest a significant positive effect. The remediation of contaminated land may have positive indirect effects in the long term.
Landscape/Townscapes
(ET10 To conserve and enhance the quality and local distinctiveness of landscapes and townscapes)
Negative/Positive Cumulatively, there is potential for urban expansion and projected growth to have a negative effect on landscape through the loss of greenfield sites, when considered with the development of the Garden Suburb. Cumulative impacts on townscape are due to significant changes in townscape character and the concentration of a great number of listed buildings in the town centre. However, there are proposals for the improvement of public realms, which would contribute to enhance the townscape through redevelopment of brownfield sites and overall regeneration of the town centre.

Climate Change

Air Quality

Energy Efficiency

Natural Resources

Sustainable Transport

Transboundary

(ET1 To improve air quality

ET4 To reduce the effects of traffic upon the environment

ET6 To limit and adapt to climate change

ER6 To encourage efficient patterns of movement in support of economic growth

ET3 To reduce waste)

Positive/Negative The policies in the Site Allocations DPD have a strong focus upon ensuring new development is accessible by public transport, walking and cycling links and that new housing, services and employment opportunities are appropriately sited. All of these measures should contribute in the long-term to enabling sustainable patterns of living and travel to be developed which could have a positive effect upon reducing carbon emissions from transportation sources and upon improving local air quality. However at the same time, new development and population growth along with the number of cars in the borough would have adverse effects on sustainable travel, air quality and climate change. The development of sites overall and combined with Ipswich Garden Suburb may lead to increases in traffic and air quality issues; however it is uncertain at this stage whether this could significantly affect the AQMAs.
There is a degree of uncertainty about these cumulative effects being realised as this is reliant upon travel choices of individual residents and workers.
Transboundary issues relate to people travelling to and from Ipswich for shopping or work. Although there may be increase in retail and employment uses, these are not considered significant and any traffic impacts are not considered significant.
New development across the borough has the potential to result in a cumulative increase in the use of natural resources and waste generation. Mitigation measures should be implemented to minimise the potential cumulative negative effects.
Water Resources
(ET7 To protect and enhance the quality of water features and resources and reduce the risk of flooding)
Negative /Positive New development is likely to place pressure on water resources and increase consumption of water resources. However, there is mitigation suggested within the site allocations assessment to ensure sustainable design, appropriate flood risk management and sustainable (urban) drainage systems incorporated into new development. The enhancement of the green infrastructure network across the borough will also provide benefits for infiltration and water management. Mitigation should also be implemented to encourage measures to reduce potable demand, use of rain water harvesting and grey water recycling systems to reduce domestic water use.
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